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Welcome to the Official Schedule for RightsCon Toronto 2018. This year’s program, built by our global community, is our most ambitious one yet. Within the program, you will find 18 thematic tracks to help you navigate our 450+ sessions

Build your own customized RightsCon schedule by logging into Sched (or creating an account), and selecting the sessions that you wish to attend. Be sure to get your ticket to RightsCon first. You can visit rightscon.org for more information. 

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Last updated: Version 2.3 (Updated May 15, 2018).

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Wednesday, May 16
 

09:00

RightsCon Toronto Opening Ceremonies
Access Now is excited to invite you to RightsCon Toronto 2018, the seventh event of the RightsCon Summit Series. As the world’s leading event on human rights in the digital age, we bring together business leaders, policy makers, general counsels, government representatives, technologists, and human rights defenders from around the world to tackle some of the most pressing issues at the intersection of human rights and digital technology. This is a space for breaking down silos, creating partnerships, and driving large-scale, real-world change toward a more free, open, and connected world.

Speakers
avatar for Kathy Brown

Kathy Brown

President / CEO, Internet Society
Kathryn C. Brown joined the Internet Society as President and Chief Executive Officer in January 2014. A veteran of Internet policy development and initiatives that have aided in the Internet’s global expansion, Ms. Brown leads the Internet Society in its mission to keep the In... Read More →
avatar for Mélanie Joly

Mélanie Joly

Minister of Canadian Heritage, Government of Canada
A lawyer by training, Mélanie Joly is passionate about her city of Montréal and the power of positive politics. Mélanie worked at two major law firms in Montréal before making the leap into communications, as a managing partner of the Montréal office of the international com... Read More →
avatar for Chief R. Stacey Laforme

Chief R. Stacey Laforme

R. Stacey Laforme is the elected Chief of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation (MNCFN). Born and raised on MNCFN, Chief Laforme has served his community for over fifteen years, being first elected to council in 1999. Chief Laforme has participated in a number of commi... Read More →
avatar for Ramy Raoof

Ramy Raoof

Senior Technologist
Ramy is a technologist and privacy researcher, interacts with a wide spectrum ranging from NGOs, journalists, lawyers, politicians, and artists on the intersection of tech and social causes, mainly on privacy and security, by devoting his skills as a techie and passion for free/o... Read More →
avatar for Brett Solomon

Brett Solomon

Co-Founder and Executive Director, Access Now
Brett is the Executive Director of Access Now, defending and extending the digital rights of users at risk around the world. By combining innovative policy, global advocacy, and direct technical support, RightsCon and grant-making, Access Now fights for human rights in the digita... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
206A

10:30

Beyond Cryptocurrencies: How YOU can Leverage the Blockchain as a Force for the Common Good
Few technological concepts have captivated minds like Blockchain since the dot.com bubble in the late 1990s. There is a lot of hype around Blockchain and cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, and the potential for impact this technology has on society. Think Blockchain 101: Where Blockchain technology meets Global Affairs. This session will help dissect the technology of blockchain and how it works to allow YOU to leverage blockchain technology in your work. We will be outlining key features of this technological innovation, so anyone can see if this technology can work for them. Key features will include data autonomy, the different types of encryption, what does decentralization really mean, and the blockchain vs. database debate. No previous technological knowledge is required, just an open mind to finally start understanding this technology. Blockchain technology isn't the answer to all your challenges. It does, however, offer the potential to fundamentally shift and impact society in the same way the internet did two decades ago. The time is now to shape it with us.

Moderators
avatar for Zac Skeith

Zac Skeith

VP Governance & Strategy, Three Lefts
Zac brings a diverse background to the work at Three Lefts. After growing up in Southeast Asia, North America, Europe, and the Middle East, he worked in Countering Violent Extremism at the supranational level before joining Three Lefts, where we are an applied research and develo... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Amy ter Haar

Amy ter Haar

Lawyer | Multi-passionate Entrepreneur, Osgoode Professional Development
Amy ter Haar is an internationally recognized authority on the legal, technological and business aspects of blockchain and has extensive leadership expertise in founding companies in the fintech and legal tech sectors. Committed to the growth of leading organizations and supporti... Read More →
avatar for Matthew Rappard

Matthew Rappard

CTO, Threelefts


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30 - 10:55
Village Main Stage

10:30

Global Indigenous Ambassador Program at ICANN: Including new voices to internet policy dialogues
The Global Indigenous Ambassador Program was designed in ICANN At-Large first as regional and pilot program within NARALO. After about one year bringing voices from North America to the community, the program expanded to being global. All RALOS, the Regional Association of At-Large Organizations, which are associations of internet end-users interested in participating in ICANN, began to outreach to indigenous communities all over the world. For ICANN 57 in November 2016, we had two ambassadors both from Native American tribes in the US. For ICANN 60 in October 2017, we had three ambassadors, two from Native American Tribes in the US and one from an Indigenous community in Bolivia. Our Mentor was from Brazil but had done much work for the indigenous communities in her country. For ICANN 61 in Puerto Rico in March 2018, we had two women from Indigenous communities in Colombia and Canada and one mentor from one of the Native American Tribes in the US. In this session, we will discuss how indigenous communities in North America have been helping develop policy in organizations like FCC and others. What was the vision of the creators of this program? What do First Nations of Canada see as priorities in internet policy and questions for a conversation with Rightscon attendees?

A permanent channel open for all Global Indigenous Ambassadors to collaborate with other activists regarding internet rights would be made available, linked to a renewal of ICANN Community Wiki page which holds information about the programme.

Moderators
avatar for Judith Hellerstein

Judith Hellerstein

Ceo, H&A
Judith has over thirty years experience in developing policies, regulations, building regulatory capacity, strategy development, broadband build out, e-Government assessment, regulatory reform, competition law, and on Internet Governance issues. Judith has advised regulators, Gov... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Chyloe Healy

Chyloe Healy

Analyst, The Alberta First Nations Information Governance Centre
My name is Chyloe Healy and I am from the Kainai First Nation in Southern Alberta, Canada and reside in Calgary, Alberta. My nation has the largest land mass within Canada and is part of the Blackfoot Confederacy. I graduated from Mount Royal University in 2016 with a Bachelor of... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Kiden

Sarah Kiden

Ford-Mozilla Open Web Fellow, Mozilla Foundation (Hosted by Research ICT Africa)
Sarah is a technologist and researcher, currently working on broadband performance and Internet measurements in Africa. She loves everything open source.
avatar for Glenn McKnight

Glenn McKnight

Chair, Foundation for Building Sustainable Communities
Glenn is active in the IEEE TORONTO Humanitarian Initiative Committee, | IEEE HAC and IEEE SIGHT. As well as being involved with ICANN and Internet Society. | Glenn is active in promoting sustainable and affordable DIY technologies at the Canadian Victory Garden providing l... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
201A

10:30

Harnessing Data to Visualize Trends in Global Civil Society
Over the past year Freedom House has been working with Datakind, a non-profit data scientist network, to organize and visualize around 100 governance, social, economic, and development indicators to illustrate historic relationships and trends between different datasets and indicators. Both organizations worked to create a collection of interactive web plots for visualizing the relationships between country ranking datasets and other socio-economic indicators, including the Fragile States Index, UN Human Development Index, Freedom in the World and World Bank open data.
Our workshop will be a demonstration of the newly created tool, specifically focusing on how to illustrate relationships and trends between data sources. We will provide specific examples of how Freedom House has been able to use the data for program strategy development, project design, and human rights advocacy. In addition to presenting the visualization tool, Freedom House will be making the tool and the complete dataset publicly available, in its raw format, on the Human Rights Support Mechanism (HRSM) Community of Practice webpage, which is through our USAID-funded human rights consortium. The tool will be targeted for researchers, activists, program managers and others involved in the human rights, democracy, governance and international development fields to utilize.
At the end of the presentation we will set aside time for questions and general feedback on the tool from the audience.

Moderators
avatar for Vukasin Petrovic

Vukasin Petrovic

Senior Director for Program Strategy, Freedom House
I serve as the Senior Director for Program Strategy and as the Technical Director for USAID funded Human Rights Support Mechanism. I am responsible for defining Freedom House’s thematic and regional program priorities, design and oversight of cutting-edge programs that focus on... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alix Lawson

Alix Lawson

Senior Program Associate, Freedom House
I am the Senior Program Associate for the Program Strategy, Design, and Learning department at Freedom House, as well as the Human Rights Support Mechanism, an LWA under USAID for human rights programming. My interests include human rights work, supporting civil society organizat... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
200A

10:30

Making the Tech USABLE -- how to gather and share user feedback from our digital security trainings
Feedback does not just take the form of user testing of tools and software. In fact, in digital security trainings, we must adapt the ways in which we collect useful information from users that can help shape and improve technologies they need the most. Trainers play a critical role in this feedback loop, as they tend to work with high risk communities who are often hard to engage with safely. They also have a a deep understanding of the risks, threats, and needs humans using these critical products.

During the past year, the USABLE (https://usable.tools) team has been working with trainers, developers, and designers to craft sessions and UX activities within digital security workshops that capture much needed information required in making usability improvements. This session will demonstrate several UX activities created by trainers and designers for the purpose of collecting feedback during a digital security training. This session will be as hands on as possible so trainers, developers and designers can experience first hand what it’s like to capture user feedback in a digital security training setting. The walk-through will be co-led by Megan DeBlois (Internews), Neema Iyer (Defend Defenders), and Neil Blazeciv (Defend Defenders) and will focus on one of the following:

Tool Feedback Collection: Tool-specific feedback collection activities that trainers can easily run in a digital security training with the purpose of sending to the developer afterward.

Persona Generation: Sessions or exercises trainers are already running or they can run easily in parallel with their digital security training with the purpose of having users generate their own personas, or profiles, of themselves (see template).

Who is this session for?

Digital Security Trainers, Developers, Designers, and Technology Influencers

What outcomes would you like your session to have?

Concrete improvements to the feedback collection methods proposed.

Directly connect developers, trainers, and designers with one another. Specifically we would like trainers to connect directly with other open-source tool developers (e.g. KeePassXC, Pisphon, The Guardian,, Enigmail, Tor, Mailvelope, Peerio, and others).

Raise awareness around the importance of trainers in the feedback and design process in software development for high risk communities.


Moderators
avatar for Megan DeBlois

Megan DeBlois

Program Manager, Information Security Programs, Internews
Let's talk usability! Currently working with humans around the globe to make security usable for those who need it most! | | Twitter: @realMegDeBlois

Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
200B

10:30

VR for the People: How Anyone can Build a Virtual Reality Universe
Virtual Reality has already shown to have huge potential in almost every industry, from education and healthcare to journalism and activism. Unfortunately, the tools and resources to build in VR can be incredibly expensive and time-consuming, but it doesn’t have to be. In this session, attendees will learn how to create, build, and start incorporating the power of VR in their work immediately by learning the basics of A-frame (a free and easy programming language, users can use to create and publish VR worlds in their browser) and creating a 360-film with smartphones.

Moderators
Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
201B

10:30

"Free Speech, Due Process, and Why I Kicked a Nazi Site Off Our Network" a Fireside Chat with Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince
Protecting a free and open Internet is crucial, but free speech online is under attack. Where in the Internet stack should content be regulated, and who should decide?

Moderators
avatar for Andrew McLaughlin

Andrew McLaughlin

Cofounder / Partner, Higher Ground Labs / Yale U
Andrew McLaughlin is co-founder and partner at Higher Ground Labs, an investment and acceleration firm for progressive campaign tech. He is also executive director of the Center for Innovative Thinking at Yale University, and a venture partner at betaworks. | | Andrew is chairma... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Prince

Matthew Prince

Co-Founder & CEO, Cloudflare
Matthew Prince is co-founder and CEO of Cloudflare. Cloudflare’s mission is to help build a better Internet. Today the company runs one of the world's largest networks: powering more than 10 trillion requests per month, nearly 10% of all Internet requests, for more than 2.5 bil... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
204C

10:30

Content regulation in the digital age: Defining terms and examining content moderation at scale
Over the last few years, technological developments and innovations have created new forms by which people can express themselves online. At the same time that the various forms of online expression have diversified, a number of governments are actively considering introducing greater liability for online platforms which fail to remove illegal or harmful content.

As content removal companies, restrictive legislation, and opponents of controversial speech increasingly target hosts of user-generated content, keeping up with the incoming demand and associated legal obligations is a challenge for any publishing platform or social network.

In order to engage meaningfully on questions of liability and how to respond to the challenges of harmful content online, it’s critical to be clear on exactly what it is we’re talking about. Despite the frequent use of the terms ‘online and content’ and ‘content regulation’, there is no universally accepted definition of ‘content’. And even with this lack of clarity, many hosts feel compelled to remove content which attracts negative PR even when no existing laws or policies are being violated. These actions come at the cost of free speech and other online liberties.

Join Global Partners Digital and Automattic, Inc in a joint discussion around defining these critical terms and moderating content in this turbulent landscape.

Moderators
avatar for Charles Bradley

Charles Bradley

Executive Director, Global Partners Digital

Speakers
avatar for Bertrand de la Chapelle

Bertrand de la Chapelle

Executive Director, Internet and Jurisdiction
avatar for Stephanie Elder

Stephanie Elder

Automattic, Inc.
Community Guardian, Automattic
avatar for Kevin Koehler

Kevin Koehler

Community Guardian, Automattic
avatar for Emma Llanso

Emma Llanso

Director, Free Expression Project, Center for Democracy & Technology
avatar for Sejal Parmar

Sejal Parmar

Senior Adviser, Representative on Freedom of the Media, OSCE
avatar for Richard Wingfield

Richard Wingfield

Legal Officer, Global Partners Digital
Legal Officer, Global Partners Digital


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
205C

10:30

Is the Internet Freedom Strategy Dead?
Over the last 8 years, the United States, Europe, Canada and others have been big proponents of the idea that more internet access would promote human rights. For example, the United States spent more than $125 million on internet freedom programs during the Obama administration, funding activities such as training digital activists in hostile environments and developing circumvention tools to bypass state-sponsored internet filters. These countries also worked with non-government stakeholders to establish policy initiatives, such as the Freedom Online Coalition, to advocate that people have the same human rights online as they have offline.

However according to an annual Freedom House report, internet freedom continues to decline. China is tightening its grip on the flow of online information through its new cybersecurity law. In the United States, the Trump administration has demonstrated little interest in expanding the Obama administration’s internet freedom programming given its general ambivalence in promoting human rights writ large. Social media platforms—tools that can enable the exercise of human rights such as the freedom of assembly—are increasingly being used as vehicles for state-sponsored information warfare.

This panel will consider the state of the internet freedom strategy. What is working, and what is not? Where should campaigners focus their policy-related activism?

Moderators
avatar for Adam Segal

Adam Segal

Director, Digital and Cyberspace Policy Program, Council on Foreign Relations

Speakers
avatar for Jason Pielemeier

Jason Pielemeier

Policy Director, Global Network Initiative
avatar for Nani Jansen Reventlow

Nani Jansen Reventlow

Director, Digital Freedom Fund
Nani Jansen Reventlow is the founding Director of the Digital Freedom Fund, which supports partners in Europe to advance digital rights through strategic litigation. Nani is also an Associate Tenant at Doughty Street Chambers and an Affiliate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, where she was a 2016-2017 Fellow. She has been an advisor to Harvard’s Cyberlaw Clinic since 2016.Nani is a recognised international lawyer and expert in human rights litigation responsible for groundbreaking freedom of expression cases across several national and international jurisdictions. Between 2011 and 2016, Nani has overseen the litigation practice of the Media Legal Defence Initiative (MLDI) globally. As a Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center, Nani developed the Catalysts for Collaboration website (https://catalystsforcollaboration.org), which offers a set of best practices and case studies encouraging activists to collaborate across disciplinary silos and use strategic litigation in digital rights... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
203B

10:30

Opportunities and Challenges of Blockchain Technologies for Sustainable Development Goals
Sustainable Development Goal 17 recognizes the importance of Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) in developing global partnerships for sustainable development. However, ICTs are also a tool whose use cuts across all of the Sustainable Development Goals as an important part of implementation. In this panel, experts discuss the disruptive potential and challenges of Blockchain as a Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) in support of the Sustainable Development Goals.

While the technology is still in a nascent phase and many issues will be addressed as the technical capability develops, some of the key constraints to addressing these challenges fall outside the scope of technology. These include governance challenges, capacity issues, ethical struggles and the effect of misinformation and hype. The objective of the session is for the panelists to introduce the DLT solutions that they are proposing or following, exchange ideas, share lessons learned and examine opportunities and challenges at policy, organizational and individual levels.

Panelists will highlight innovative approaches as well as propose new collaborations and strategies for responding to those challenges.

Moderators
avatar for Oonagh Fitzgerald

Oonagh Fitzgerald

Director of the International Law Research Program, Centre for International Governance Innovation
As director of CIGI’s International Law Research Program, Oonagh Fitzgerald established and oversees CIGI’s international law research agenda, which includes policy-relevant research on issues of international economic law, environmental law, intellectual property law and inn... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Katherine Foster

Katherine Foster

Advisor, World Bank
Innovation for Sustainable Development and Climate Change: Blockchain and Innovation PPPs | Biography | A former Canadian Diplomat, Katherine Foster focused on International Trade, Climate Change and Human Security for nearly a decade before turning to building innovation for so... Read More →
avatar for Christine Mohan

Christine Mohan

Co-founder, Civil
Christine has 20+ years of experience with media firms and technology startups in New York City, Boston and Washington DC. She spent 12 years at The New York Times Company and The Wall Street Journal in corporate communications, product marketing and web operations roles. Christi... Read More →
avatar for Xiaochen Zhang

Xiaochen Zhang

President, FinTech4Good
Xiaochen leads the design and implementation of FinTech4Good’s strategy which aims to introduce impactful fintech and blockchain solutions to frontier markets through incubation, acceleration and investment. He brings more than 16 years of thought leadership and global experien... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
200C

10:30

Bot Battles: Disinformation, Computational Propaganda and Speech Regulation – Digital Rights and Press Freedom
This session will bring together academics, program implementers, lawyers, technologists, and journalists who work on various aspects of responses aimed at countering threats posed by propaganda, especially computational propaganda, disinformation, hate speech, trolling and other negative forms of content spread in social and traditional media. Current challenges posed by information warfare have forced promoters of democratic values to re-think long held international norms and best practices that support freedom of speech, press and expression, and access to information, while at the same time responding to the very real and threatening challenges posed by disinformation and propaganda, often driven by automated, online systems.
The uncertainty about how to best respond to threats posed by disinformation and propaganda is acutely felt by media development organizations (donors, implementers, media outlets) in countries like Ukraine and Georgia as well as throughout Eastern and Southeastern Europe, where for years media assistance support has been directed at supporting “the legal enabling environment for free and independent media” – a term that broadly encompasses efforts to support rule of law designed to promote freedom of the press, access to information and a democratic media environment. These efforts, however, are under threat not only from information warfare tactics including disinformation and computational propaganda campaigns; they are also tied to and part of the spread of illiberal democracy.
As such, during this session, we will invite presenters to comment on how to define propaganda, misinformation and disinformation; whether to even attempt to regulate it; and how and why our current "international standards and best practices" that support freedom of expression are so challenged, and perhaps in need of some critical re-thinking in light of new communications technologies and the weaponization of information.
To help set up the discussion and debate, the group will then turn to short presentations on research that explores the use on computational propaganda during elections to promote disinformation, misinformation, and other forms of propaganda – case studies will include research from Canada, Georgia, and Ukraine. We will discuss methods of responding to computational propaganda and disinformation in political systems, through their integration in elections observation missions, the development of ongoing projects to identify bot networks such as OII’s Comprop Project, or by combating disinformation directly, with the example of StopFake’s work in Ukraine.
Following the framing of the problems and challenges free speech and digital rights in an age of computational propaganda and deliberate acts to misinform and spread fake news, the session will engage in a debate and encourage audience participation and feedback on the issues at hand. Outcomes include:
-Ideas to integrate teams of media, technology and social sciences researchers, to identify networks quickly, analyze what they are promoting or attacking, and how they are connected. This roundtable would provide a forum for these diverse groups and perspectives to connect.
-Building collaboration between governments, technology companies, media, and civil society on promoting democratic norms and networks.
-Defining norms and methods of engaging with political parties and campaigns, in particular, to commit to the non-use of computational propaganda techniques and their disavowal when used by others, would represent a major step forward.
-Constructing a larger picture for the RightsCon community describing how these techniques are used internationally, as well as active and potential responses, would be a major contribution to the development of stronger online democratic systems all over the world.
-Jump starting a research initiative that will be a partnership between GFMD, media and digital rights lawyers, and university-based researchers, together with involvement of CIMA. This area of law and policy requires cross-cultural collaboration and a multi-country perspective.

Moderators
avatar for Susan Abbott

Susan Abbott

Independent Consultant
Susan Abbott is an independent consultant who specializes in working with non-profit organizations, universities, and donors in the areas of media development, civil society assistance, and digital rights. Abbott provides consulting services in the areas of fundraising and grant... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Arnaudo

Daniel Arnaudo

Senior Program Manager, National Democratic Institute
Daniel Arnaudo is a senior program manager at NDI for governance, covering the intersection of democracy and technology with a special responsibility to develop projects tracking and countering disinformation worldwide. Concurrently, he is a Research Fellow with the Igarapé Inst... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Dubois

Elizabeth Dubois

Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa
avatar for Caroline Giraud

Caroline Giraud

Freedom of Expression/Media and Advocacy Advisor, Media4Democracy.EU
Caroline Giraud works on human rights, freedom of expression and media development since 2000. She has been with Internews, Reporters Without Borders, the Global Forum for Media Development, the Global Investigative Journalism Network. Currently an independent consultant, her mai... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Courtney Radsch

Dr. Courtney Radsch

Advocacy Director, Committee to Protect Journalists
Dr. Courtney Radsch is the Advocacy Director of the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ). As a journalist, researcher, and freedom of expression advocate, she writes and speaks frequently on the nexus of technology, journalism, and rights. She is the author of Cyberactivism a... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
201C

10:30

Lightning Talks: State Sponsored Trolls & (Dis) information
How Social Shaped The Zimbabweans Uprising (Magamba Network)

Speakers: 
Munyaradzi Dodo

This discussion will analyse how Zimbabweans used social media during the fall of Robert Mugabe, How social media helped create an environment were a peaceful transition could happen.

Is This a New Face of Info War? "Patriotic" Trolling and Disinformation -- the Iran Edition (Harvard Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society/NetFreedom Pioneers)

Speakers: Simin Kargar

Online harassment and smear campaigns are increasingly applied as a form of information control to curb free speech and exert power in cyberspace. Targeted harassment of dissidents on social media appears as the most recent form of strategic communication, where particular messages are crafted by state-affiliated actors to manipulate public opinion.

This session addresses the circumstances under which these coordinated efforts are likely to emerge, the latest practices of Iran to extend its ideological arms across social media, and the ultimate goals that they pursue.

Stopping Vietnam’s State Sponsored Trolls (Viet Tan)

Speakers: Don Le

The Vietnamese government has gone on the record in employing a 10,000-strong cyber army, whose sole purpose is to spread misinformation and silence dissent. These state-sponsored trolls — Force 47 — have deftly exploited Facebook's community standards and policies to purposefully disseminated patently fake news about activists and independent media organizations. There are online groups of government trolls coordinating mass reporting of activist accounts and celebrating their accomplishments when accounts and pages are taken down by Facebook. So how do activists take on Force 47? Come find out.

Truth on the Frontlines: Disinformation in Ukraine (IREX)

Speakers: Oleksiy Matsuka & Nataliya Gumenyuk

The fight against Russian disinformation is constant in Ukraine. Our two speakers will take you deep inside the issue with their first-person perspectives and the ways they work to overcome outside influence, maintain their independence and provide vulnerable populations and IDPs (especially in Donetsk and Luhansk) with fact-based information. Nataliya Gumenyuk, directs hromadske.ua, a journalist-led initiative to create public broadcasting in Ukraine. Since the start of the Revolution and during the conflict in Ukraine, she has been reporting from the field in Maidan, Crimea and Donbas. Named to Reporters Without Borders list of 100 Information Heroes in 2014, Oleksiy Matsuka leads the Board of the Donetsk Institute of Information. This lightning talk will address 3 key points: Russian methods of disinformation in Ukraine, how individual media outlets address it and what those inside Ukraine see as the role of the international community in fighting it.

When "fake news" drive to the south: misinformation and digital rights challenges at Latin America 2018's elections (InternetLab)

Speakers: Dennys Antonialli

This talk aims to introduce how electoral processes are a new main focus of research and advocacy concerning digital rights and to monitor the emergence of new bottlenecks for privacy, freedom of expression and democratic politics
in the Latin American region.

Digitally-driven elections raise multiple concerns, such as the protection of legitimate civic engagement and the participation of the disenfranchised, the defense of privacy and its protection of the autonomy of citizens to discuss and decide and the ensurance of access to quality political information.

As we have observed, electoral courts, commissions and proceedings designed to ensure fairness and democratic politics are traditionally driven by the regulation of offline media outlets, but are not used to internet governance standards and lack expertise and capacity to deal with cutting-edge technology implications, such as those which derive from microtargetting, profile-farming, botnets and cyberespionage.

The choice for discussing these issues from a regional perspective is not by chance. After a traumatic experience watching the latest US fake-news-turmoil, digital rights-focused organizations of the region prepare to face the next wave of challenges that will come during the 2018 elections - processes that promise to intensify a moment of political polarization and a relevant conservative rise.

The scenario seems even more troublesome when we think of social media as the new main platforms for political campaigns. This talk will rely on InternetLab's ongoing research to highlight the importance of advancing the digital rights agenda in Latin America to update and improve our electoral laws and systems.

Speakers
avatar for Nataliya Gumenyuk

Nataliya Gumenyuk

Head, Journalist, hromadske ua
Nataliya Gumenyuk –   is a Ukrainian  journalist and commentator specializing in foreign affairs. She is co-founder and currently head of Hromadske.TV  - an initiative of Ukrainian journalist to create public broadcasting in Ukraine, and Hromadske International www.en.hroma... Read More →
avatar for Simin Kargar

Simin Kargar

Human Rights Lawyer, Berkman Klein Center
Simin Kargar is a human rights lawyer with a focus on the interrelations of technology and human rights. She studies harmful speech online, gender-based violence and technology, and the interplays of social media, power and new propaganda. In addition, Simin investigates how disc... Read More →
avatar for Don Le

Don Le

Media Liaison, Viet Tan
Don is the Media Liaison for Viet Tan, an organisation promoting democratic change in Vietnam. He has helped connect grassroots activists with journalists to bring under-represented voices to the international community. Don has been involved in Viet Tan’s international advocac... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
205A

10:30

Enforcing Net Neutrality with Evidenced Based Policy Making
The goal of this session is to provide an understanding of the current state of play in net neutrality in different countries and regions, discuss challenges that panelists have encountered, provide insight into the work of digital rights NGOs in making sure that the net neutrality provisions are enforced, talk about how the public can continue to be involved once net neutrality legislation is designed (e.g. submitting complaints to regulators, bringing cases, public advocacy). In this discussion, we hope to introduce more folks to tools that can be useful in their policy and advocacy work, e.g. internet measurement data like Measurement Lab, OONI and others. The discussion will cover how to think about working with measurement tools as part of advocacy and campaigns and overall be a conversation on strategic thinking with data in pursuit of evidence based policy making.

Moderators
avatar for Georgia Bullen

Georgia Bullen

Director of Technology Projects, New America's Open Technology Institute
Georgia manages the Measurement Lab and the Tech for Social Justice projects at OTI, and supports Broadband Adoption, Data Visualization and technology work generally. She has previously worked on data visualization projects in the areas of social media, transportation logistics... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Luca Belli

Luca Belli

Head of Internet Governance, Center for Technology and Society at FGV
Luca Belli, PhD is Senior Researcher at the Center for Technology and Society (CTS) of Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV), where he heads the Internet Governance project. Luca is also associated researcher at Centre de Droit Public Comparé of Paris 2 University. For those who do no... Read More →
avatar for Amba Kak

Amba Kak

Tech policy fellow, Mozilla
avatar for Eric Null

Eric Null

Policy Counsel, New America's Open Technology Institute
avatar for Javier Pallero

Javier Pallero

Policy Analyst, Access Now
Policy Analyst at Access Now focused on Latin America. | I work on: | - Net Neutrality ( including zero rating, OTT regulation) | - Privacy (surveillance, data protection) | - Business and Human Rights - economic concentration | - Freedom of expression (shutdowns, intermediary... Read More →
avatar for Maria Xynou

Maria Xynou

Open Observatory of Network Interference (OONI)
Maria works with the Open Observatory of Network Interference (OONI), a free software project that aims to increase transparency of internet censorship around the world. | | She manages OONI's partnerships, engaging human rights communities worldwide with censorship measurement... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
204B

10:30

Paralysis through disruption: Understanding the full human impacts of network disruptions
The impacts of network disruptions are felt very broadly across all sectors in
impacted geographies. And yet digital rights groups and ICT companies sometimes feel like voices in the wilderness pushing back against these restrictions. This workshop will try to come up with tactics for engaging new actors from across civil society, the business community, and other sectors as advocates against disruption. After initial presentation of the work the presenters and their organizations have done, we will break into groups focused on particular kinds of impact (e.g., humanitarian, security, education, etc.) and ask each group to map out the kinds of organizations that are likely to be impacted by disruptions and suggest how to engage them on this issue.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Yves Nissim

Yves Nissim

Deputy Chief CSR Officer, Orange
Yves is deputy Chief CSR Officer of the Orange Group. His main field of expertise is Group CSR transformation, CSR reporting for the Group, stake holder dialogue and Human rights. He has carried Stake holder dialogue based on Orange CSR Strategy, in the main countries of the Ora... Read More →
avatar for Julie Owono

Julie Owono

Executive Director, Internet Sans frontières
I work at the intersection of Tech, Human Rights, Business. | I am a lawyer, and the Executive Director of Internet Without Borders, an organisation defending digital rights, and an open Internet for all.
avatar for Zak Rogoff

Zak Rogoff

#KeepItOn Fellow, Access Now
I'm a global campaigner focused on human rights and the internet. I want to talk to you about internet shutdowns, platform regulations, technology & immigration, and of course, advocacy strategy! | | My background is in political communication and robotics engineering y estoy a... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
204A

10:30

The surveillance tool we love to carry: Cell phones searches and privacy in the evolving legal landscape
Cell phones are increasingly becoming ubiquitous tools for participating in contemporary societies around the globe. We use them to communicate by voice, and increasingly by text. They help us keep information at our fingertips, including intimate details about our relationships, activities, and transactions. They help us navigate our physical environment with mapping tools and GPS. And in the process, they create a treasure-trove of personal information about us and those we are connected to, while facilitating real-time and after the fact tracking and surveillance of our movements, online and off.

But while both the technology and social norms are developing rapidly, the laws that protect our privacy in relation to cell phones are not. Courts are increasingly struggling with cases that involve privacy not just in the personal information we store on the phones, but also the information about us that the phones collect and transmit by virtue of the way they are designed and the infrastructures they must interact with to function. In Canada, the Supreme Court recently ruled in the combined cases of R. v. Marakah and R. v. Jones, establishing some privacy rights in text messages once they are sent. In the US, Carpenter v. the United States is before the U.S. Supreme Court, looking at whether police should be able to obtain detailed tracking information, collected routinely by service providers, without a warrant. On both sides of the Canadian/US border, warrantless searches by border officers are being challenged on constitutional grounds.

This public roundtable session will engage a mix of legal professionals, activists and advocates, and technologists in a guided discussion about the legal issues, ways to engage in the kinds of advocacy that might help shape privacy protective outcomes, and ways that technology can help solve the problems it has created. We will begin with experts providing brief summaries of key cases and issues to launch a wide-ranging and interactive discussion with the goals of identifying core issues shared by (or debated among) legal, policy, and technology sector participants. We hope to create a new, cross-border shared understanding of commonalities and differences in current approaches to cell phone privacy and legal advocacy, establish ongoing relationships that could, where appropriate, lead to shared interventions in key cases in the form of amicus briefs, and engage and build relationships with non-legal stakeholders whose support can contribute to the advocacy efforts for legal reform, and the efforts to establish new precedents for the digital age.


Moderators
avatar for Lex Gill

Lex Gill

Citizen Lab

Speakers
avatar for Brenda

Brenda

Director, Privacy, Technology & Surveillance Project, Canadian Civil Liberties Association
Privacy advocacy. Social implications of new and emerging technologies. Laws protecting privacy. Lack of laws protecting privacy. Exciting legal challenges. Surveillance. National security (especially signals intelligence). Talk to me about any of these! I work for the Canadian C... Read More →
avatar for Robyn Greene

Robyn Greene

Policy Counsel and Government Affairs Lead, New America's Open Technology Institute
avatar for David Greene

David Greene

Civil Liberties Director, EFF
I am the Civil Liberties Director at EFF, which means I direct the team of US lawyers working on free speech and privacy rights issues. My personal expertise is in US free speech law.
avatar for Jon Penney

Jon Penney

Assistant Professor / Research Fellow, Schulich Law, Dalhousie University / Citizen Lab / Princeton CITP /
Jon Penney is a legal academic and social scientist. He is presently a Research Fellow at the Citizen Lab located at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, a Research Affiliate of Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy, and teaches law as an As... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
203A

10:30

A Decade of Progress: Where Do We Go Next?
When it comes to internet freedom, getting a company to flip the right switch or deploy a new policy can help protect the rights of millions of people; getting an entire industry to adopt better practices can protect billions of people. However, those changes usually don’t come about without years of hard work from advocates both inside and outside of those companies. Join us as we survey the past decade of advancements in the business and human right space and the work it took to make them happen, and as we look for lessons on how we can gain even more ground over the next ten years. Staff from the groundbreaking Business & Human Rights Program that was founded a decade ago within Yahoo and is now a part of Oath, will discuss the ins and outs of protecting human rights from the inside, and how the dedicated team model has evolved. External advocates and researchers will survey what strategies and tactics have best moved the needle on key issues like transparency and security over the years, and what tools have developed to help gauge the sector’s overall performance when it comes to protecting users’ rights. And advocates from both the inside and the outside will reflect on how best to handle the challenges and opportunities for human rights in the ICT sector that lie ahead in the next decade.

Moderators
avatar for Nicole Karlebach

Nicole Karlebach

Global Head, Business & Human Rights, Oath

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Bankston

Kevin Bankston

Director, New America's Open Technology Institute
Internet rights advocate and Director of @NewAmerica's @OTI. Previously rolling nerdy from @ACLU in NYC to @EFF in SF to @CenDemTech in DC. Fighting to prevent dystopia.
avatar for Omar Hakim

Omar Hakim

Organizer, Consumer Reports
Omar Hakim is a Grassroots Organizer at Consumer Reports working on financial services, technology, and privacy related matters. | | Prior to joining Consumer Reports, Omar was the national coordinator for Cities for Action, a coalition of mayors and municipal leaders advocatin... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Mackinnon

Rebecca Mackinnon

Director, Ranking Digital Rights
Rebecca MacKinnon is director of the Ranking Digital Rights project which works to set global standards for how companies in the information and communications technology (ICT) sector and beyond should respect freedom of expression and privacy. In 2018 project's flagship Corporat... Read More →
avatar for Michael Samway

Michael Samway

President, The Business and Human Rights Group
Michael Samway is president of The Business and Human Rights Group, where he advises technology companies on ethical decision-making regarding free expression, privacy, public safety and national security. Samway spent ten years (2000-2010) at Yahoo!, where he was a vice presiden... Read More →
avatar for Cynthia Wong

Cynthia Wong

Senior Internet Researcher, Human Rights Watch


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
205B

10:30

Effective 21st Century Organizing: Learning From the Past, Building the Future
This session brings together a panel of journalists, dissidents, and activists to reflect on their experiences coordinating effective collective action outside the increasingly outdated norms of traditional organizational models. Some panelists have helped to organize whistleblower connection networks, while others are currently engaged in creating platforms that assist collaborative organizing. By describing major successes and challenges they have experienced through their activism, the panelists will paint a picture of the future of organizing that utilizes lessons learned while simultaneously leveraging modern tactics and technologies. The panel aims to utilize this exchange of experiences in order to articulate new directions for 21st century activism.

Moderators
avatar for Bailey Lamon

Bailey Lamon

Vice-Chairwoman, Pirate Parties International
Bailey Lamon is a Canadian activist, social worker and occasional writer. She has been involved in a number of social movements since 2011 including Occupy, Idle No More, pipeline resistance, anti-fascist actions throughout Ontario and the fight against Canada's pro-surveillance... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Barrett Brown

Barrett Brown

Founder, Pursuance Project
Barrett Brown is a writer and anarchist activist. His work has appeared in Vanity Fair, the Guardian, The Intercept, Huffington Post, New York Press, Skeptic, The Daily Beast, al-Jazeera, and dozens of other outlets. In 2009 he founded Project PM, a distributed think-tank, which... Read More →
avatar for Naomi Colvin

Naomi Colvin

Director, Courage Foundation
avatar for Thomas Drake

Thomas Drake

former National Security Agency senior executive, whistleblower
Thomas Drake is a former senior executive at the National Security Agency, where he blew the whistle on massive multibillion-dollar fraud, waste and abuse; the widespread violations of the rights of citizens through secret mass surveillance programs after 9/11; and also 9/11 inte... Read More →
avatar for Birgitta Jonsdottir

Birgitta Jonsdottir

Birgitta Jónsdóttir is a Poetician and a former parliamentarian for the Civic Movement & Pirate Party in the Icelandic Parliament & chairman for IMMI (International Modern Media Institute). | Birgitta has helped create two political movements since 2009, the Civic Movement and the Pirate Party 2013, both parties have successfully entered the Icelandic Parliament. She specializes is 21st century lawmaking with focus on direct democracy, freedom of expression, information and digital privacy. She was a hacker in parliament. Birgitta is long time activist and was a WikiLeaks volunteer when the largest leak in human history was dropped into the digital black box of the organization by the courageous whistleblower Chelsea Manning. She played a crucial role in WikiLeaks release of the Collateral Murder. Birgitta put forward early 2010 the IMMI parliamentary resolution with the aim of resurrecting Iceland out of its post crisis misery as a Digital Safe Haven for freedom of expression, information and digital privacy. The resolution was unanimously adopted in the parliament, tasking the Icelandic government in creating this vision. The creation of... Read More →
avatar for Jesselyn Radack

Jesselyn Radack

Director, Espose Facts/WHISPeR
Jesselyn Radack heads the Whistleblower and Source Protection Program (WHISPeR) at ExposeFacts. As National Security & Human Rights Director of WHISPeR, her work focuses on the issues of secrecy, surveillance, torture and drones, where she has been at the forefront of challen... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
202B

11:00

Tech Policy Hackathons: how to encourage policy advocates and technologists to collaborate on digital rights
Technologists and policy advocates are often in the same spaces, but it’s hard to create opportunities for real collaboration between them. Even when everyone speaks the same language, it often feels like technologists and policy advocates are actually speaking different languages. Bringing together the collective knowledge of activists, policy advocates and technologists to build public policies for technology issues is a pain point of most civil society organisations, but a necessary one in many cases. It involves a range of skill sets and experiences, and especially people on both sides of the aisle (technologists and advocates) who can speak to the other group. Since it is hard to find individuals to have this mix of skill sets, we built a pilot project that brought together policy advocates working on internet freedom issues together with technologists from the same regions, in a 4-day Hackathon, to talk, present, and come up with prototypes for projects that they could collaborate on. We built a methodology for the Tech Policy Hackathons, and tested it out in two Hackathons in 2017- one with partners in Latin America, and the other in South Africa. In this session we present to you our methodology and learnings. We will also use this as a platform to invite questions from the audience to answer to more nuanced needs. The session itself will be a mix of sharing of experiences and sharing of the methodology.


Wednesday May 16, 2018 11:00 - 11:25
Village Main Stage

11:30

Killing me softly with his vote: populism and the use digital mass communication to undermine the legitimacy of the judiciary
For this session we will bring together experts from different countries in different continents to provide cross-country insights and discuss the role of ICTs’ in fostering populism. The specific focus will be paid to judiciary power being confronted by populist groups all over the world. Such confrontation usually takes the form of either a representation claim (questioning the legitimacy of judges themselves) or a political claim (questioning the inconsistency of judicial opinions). Activism might be, thus, fueling the populist discourse. The role of ICTs in the dissemination of populism is not fully explored. Their potential for contributing to the crisis of legitimate representation is enormous due to fast dissemination of thoroughly constructed messages to a broad audience. Using ICTs both populists groups and judges can create an effect of increased visibility. Populists in many countries and circumstances have been trying to foster the idea that elected representatives are invested in more qualified, at times higher powers than judges. At the same time, judges may tend to use the opposite rhetoric of “us against the establishment”, thus trying to turn negative media coverage to their advantage. In order to retain mass support and trust into judiciary, some judges also actively present themselves as channeling popular sentiment and speaking for the true interests of the people.The volumes of information, of which only a smaller part is of truly high quality, generate a trust crisis. Even though populism is a world-wide phenomenon, some countries achieve the perfection in practicing it to the extent that it becomes the mainstream communication policy. Given that, the winning strategy for a judge is to present himself/herself as a stand-alone figure, independent from institutions, but acting according to standards of ethics and good faith. By speaking their minds through online media, judges send signals about what future decisions might look like, potentially shaping the behavior of actors outside the court. Each participant shall describe the situation as seen from his country in 5 minutes. Interventions and clarifications are expected as part of the debate. Taking that into consideration, 30-35 minutes will have been used. The remaining time would be open to participants, both attending onsite and remote ones, in an attempt to confirm the observations, to find common aspects, points of touch, discrepancies and even eventual inconsistencies in the main idea of the debate.

Moderators
avatar for Cláudio Lucena

Cláudio Lucena

Professor/Researcher, UEPB, Brazil/FCT and Católica Global, Portugal
Claudio Lucena is a Professor and the former Dean of the Law Faculty at Paraíba State University, UEPB, in Brazil, and a researcher for the Portuguese Government Agency Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, affiliated with the Research Center for the Future of Law, Universi... Read More →

Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 11:30 - 11:55
Village Main Stage

12:00

Walking the Walk: Responsible Data Resources in the Shadow the GDPR
“Responsible Data” has become a growing buzzword to reflect ethical duties around consent, privacy, security, and ownership of information collected, used, and shared among civil society. Oxfam, for example, instituted a responsible data policy in 2015, which underwent review last year. More recently, the ICRC partnered with the Brussels Privacy Hub to produce a detailed handbook on data protection in humanitarian action. Institutional donors have begun to realize the importance of data security for grantees, but gaps in knowledge, resources, and technical expertise to support responsible data remain pervasive among not-for-profit organisations. This short session will discuss existing resources currently available to advance Responsible Data efforts within organisations. It will also highlight the important role that donors and public/private collaborations can play to promote better data practices and.

Moderators
avatar for Joseph Jerome

Joseph Jerome

Policy Counsel, Center for Democracy & Technology
Joseph Jerome is a lawyer for the Privacy & Data Project at the Center for Democracy & Technology. His work focuses on big picture legal and ethical questions posed by emerging technologies, but he also is trying to wrap his head around the GDPR. He's written about data uses in v... Read More →

Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 12:25
Village Main Stage

12:00

Can GDPR protect you from AI? What GDPR can and cannot do
Around the world, governments are trying to make automated decision-making more accountable: New York city introduced a bill that would require the city to make public the computer instructions that are used, invisibly, in all kinds of government decision-making. In Europe, the GDPR which will enter into force in May 2018, gives citizens (not just in Europe) more rights with regards to profiling and automated decision-making.

Discussions around GDPR and AI are often narrowly focussed on the "right to explanation". Yet, comprehensive data protection laws have much more far-reaching implications for AI, in that they regulate how personal data can be processed. In this session we will discuss the merits of different regulatory approaches and debate how they can be used strategically.

Moderators
avatar for Frederike Kaltheuner

Frederike Kaltheuner

Data Exploitation Lead, Policy Officer, Privacy International
Hi! I work for Privacy International in London where I'm leading our work on data exploitation. We're a team of technologists, policy experts, lawyers and investigators advocating for strong regional, national and international laws that protect privacy. We work on policing tech... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Miranda Bogen

Miranda Bogen

Policy Analyst, Upturn
Miranda Bogen is a Policy Analyst at Upturn, where she focuses on the social implications of machine learning and artificial intelligence, and the effect of technology platforms on civil and human rights. She has coauthored reports on data ethics, governing automated decisions, a... Read More →
avatar for Joris van Hoboken

Joris van Hoboken

Professor of Law, Vrije Universiteit Brussels & University of Amsterdam
internet-based service regulation, AI, algorithmic governance, platforms, automation in content moderation, intermediary liability, privacy, data protection, GDPR, data subject rights, freedom of expression, EU standards.
avatar for Joseph Jerome

Joseph Jerome

Policy Counsel, Center for Democracy & Technology
Joseph Jerome is a lawyer for the Privacy & Data Project at the Center for Democracy & Technology. His work focuses on big picture legal and ethical questions posed by emerging technologies, but he also is trying to wrap his head around the GDPR. He's written about data uses in v... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
204C

12:00

Machines That Learn: Can They Also Be Taught Human Values?
Artificial Intelligence and machine learning promise transformational benefits, but also raise concerns about unexpected or undesirable outcomes, especially where data-enabled decisions have consequences for people’s lives. The Congressional AI Caucus held a session on Capitol Hill on November 7, 2017 on how industry, academic and technical groups are addressing these ethical challenges. Members of Congress and their staff heard about the development of ethical standards that can promote the development and use of these technologies, while aligning outcomes to our moral values and ethical principles. Come hear how policymakers and stakeholders can encourage the responsible advancement of Artificial Intelligence to benefit society as this transformational technology becomes a critical element in all aspects of our daily lives.

Moderators
avatar for Mark MacCarthy

Mark MacCarthy

Senior Vice President for Public Policy, Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA)

Speakers
avatar for Ansgar Koene

Ansgar Koene

Senior Research Fellow: UnBIAS, CaSMa & Horizon Policy Impact - Horizon Digital Economy Research Institute, University of Nottingham; Working Group Chair - IEEE Standard on Algorithm Bias Considerations
avatar for Alex London

Alex London

Clara L. West Professor of Philosophy and Director, Center for Ethics and Policy, Carnegie Mellon University
Alex John London is the Clara L. West Professor of Ethics and Philosophy and Director of the Center for Ethics and Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. Professor London is an elected Fellow of the Hastings Center whose work focuses on ethical and policy issues surrounding the de... Read More →
avatar for Jeanna Matthews

Jeanna Matthews

Clarkson Universoty/Data and Society
| Jeanna N. Matthews is an associate professor of Computer Science at Clarkson University (Potsdam, New York). She is currently a member of the Executive Committee of US-ACM, the U.S. Public Policy Committee of ACM. She is the co-chair of US-ACM's subcommittee of Algorithmic Tra... Read More →
avatar for Gawain Morrison

Gawain Morrison

CEO, Sensum
Gawain Morrison is the CEO and Co-Founder of Sensum, builders of empathic technology for smart mobility, people & places. He has led the company to become world-leaders at measuring & understanding emotions 'in the wild', where people live their lives. Sensum has worked with some... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
200C

12:00

The Toronto Declaration on Discrimination in Machine Learning
The Toronto Declaration on Discrimination in Machine Learning is a step toward developing detailed guidelines for the promotion of equality and protection of the right to nondiscrimination in machine learning. The Declaration will be crafted in the days leading up to RightsCon to address the substantial risks of discriminatory profiling in decision making driven by machine learning. Applied to big data sets, machine learning enables detailed discrimination caused by the underlying data and the design and implementation of systems. The lack of diversity among those designing and implementing systems contributes to these risks. The Declaration will address necessary protections for companies and governments exploring and implementing the future of machine learning.

Join the drafters of the Declaration for a roundtable to discuss the text, how it will be used, and next steps. The Toronto Declaration will form the basis for future work identifying and remediating the threats of discrimination in machine learning.

Speakers
avatar for Anna Bacciarelli

Anna Bacciarelli

Advisor on Technology and Human Rights, Amnesty International
I'm an advisor and researcher on technology and human rights at Amnesty International, based in London but looking at global impacts of artificial intelligence and big data on human rights. | | I'm happy to chat about all things AI and rights - particularly opportunities for col... Read More →
avatar for Sherif Elsayed-Ali

Sherif Elsayed-Ali

Director of Global Issues and Research, Amnesty International
avatar for Fanny Hidvegi

Fanny Hidvegi

European Policy Manager, Access Now
Fanny (@infofannny) is Access Now’s European Policy Manager based in Brussels. Previously, Fanny was International Privacy Fellow at the Electronic Privacy Information Center in Washington, D.C. where she focused on E.U.-U.S. data transfers. For three years Fanny led the Freedo... Read More →
avatar for Estelle Masse

Estelle Masse

Senior Policy Analyst, Access Now
Data protection, GDPR, Privacy, Net Neutrality
avatar for Drew Mitnick

Drew Mitnick

Policy Counsel, Access Now


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
206A

12:00

Is Multistakeholder Internet Governance Advancing, Dying, or Evolving?

This session, jointly organized by UNESCO and ICANN’s Non-Commercial Users’ Constituency, aims to foster a robust discussion on the strengths and weaknesses of multistakeholder models and to develop recommendations to improve these processes in the future.

Multistakeholder governance models are built around the idea of bringing diverse stakeholders together to collaborate on policy making solutions. These models have become particularly prevalent in Internet governance, where representatives from the commercial, technical, academic, governmental and civil society sectors all have a seat at the table and share a role in policymaking. However, systems that are designed to be egalitarian can nonetheless manifest biases in practice. In ICANN’s case, although the IANA transition has already occurred, uncertainty persists over where governments’ role in Internet governance ends and ICANN’s begins, allowing the former to wield a powerful stick over the process. Meanwhile, human rights advocates and other non-commercial interests, who in theory engage on an equal footing with their counterparts from the business community, can be placed at a natural disadvantage by the fact that they generally have fewer resources to work with.

The session will welcome participants from ICANN and from CGI.br, as well as multistakeholder Internet governance participants from civil society, academia, and the private sector, to discuss the challenges and future of multistakeholder Internet governance. Among the entry points to the discussion will be a recent study released by UNESCO, “What if we all governed the Internet? Advancing multistakeholder participation in Internet governance”, which was developed as part of the UNESCO Series on Internet Freedom.

The session will be moderated by UNESCO representative Ms. Xianhong Hu and Mr. Michael Karanicolas of the Executive Committee of ICANN's Non-Commercial Users’ Constituency.

Moderators
avatar for Xianhong Hu

Xianhong Hu

UNESCO
Ms Xianhong Hu, joined UNESCO in the Communication and Information Sector since 2006. Her main responsibilities are in the areas of freedom of expression online and offline, Internet privacy, media development and Internet governance and she has followed the process of the Wor... Read More →
avatar for Michael Karanicolas

Michael Karanicolas

President, Right to Know Coalition

Speakers
avatar for Kathy Brown

Kathy Brown

President / CEO, Internet Society
Kathryn C. Brown joined the Internet Society as President and Chief Executive Officer in January 2014. A veteran of Internet policy development and initiatives that have aided in the Internet’s global expansion, Ms. Brown leads the Internet Society in its mission to keep the In... Read More →
avatar for Jeremy Malcolm

Jeremy Malcolm

Senior Global Policy Analyst, EFF
avatar for Kyung-Sin Park

Kyung-Sin Park

Korea University /Open Net Korea


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
203B

12:00

UX to the rescue! Help a crypto protocol's usability

The current technological landscape has several tools for secure, encrypted, real-time group communication -- be that text chat, voice chat, or even video. Tools that can make this happen include Signal, WhatsApp, and Wire, and they are awesome! One property that these tools all share, is reliance on a piece of central infrastructure to orchestrate not just the communication logistics, but the security assurances as well.

The (n+1)sec protocol offers the possibility to have end-to-end encrypted group communications in a decentralized environment. It can be used as an overlay to any general-purpose communication network, including federated and peer-to-peer infrastructures. This session will describe the social implications and complications of running an encrypted group discussion without a central authority for key selection, transcript consistency and room moderation. We would like to engage the audience in a discussion around the presented challenges as well as the broader applications for Internet communications privacy.

https://github.com/equalitie/np1sec


Speakers
avatar for Dmitri Vitaliev

Dmitri Vitaliev

Director, eQualitie
Dmitri is the founder and director of eQualit.ie with fifteen years experience working on digital security and privacy technology with civil society organizations. He has led and participated in missions to over 40 countries, is the author of the "Digital Security and Privacy for... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
200A

12:00

Lightning Talks: Human Rights for the Digital Age: Hearing from Leaders
Session Emcee: Naman Aggarwal

Disrupting Human Rights Activism Through Crowdsourcing
(Movements.org)

Speakers: 
Hamed Behravan

The lightning talk is about an already developed platform called Movements.org that aims to disrupt human rights activism through crowdsourcing. The p2p platform enables ordinary users with specific skills to provide pro bono assistance in a variety of fields to human rights defenders or victim of human right violations who need help. The session will be dedicated to introducing this unique human rights matchmaking platform to the human rights community with the goal of recruiting more participants, who are willing to help human right defenders in closed societies. The talk will also focus on the importance of decentralizing human rights activism and increasing the global pool of talented individuals or committed organizations that are willing to provide pro bono assistance to those who need it the most.

Defending freedom of speech under the Venezuelan Regime (NGO RedesAyuda)

Speakers: 
Melanio Escobar

It´s a session about our latest communication project called Humano Derecho Radio Estación (www.humanoderecho.com), an online radio that broadcast 24/7 radio shows about human rights using rock music as a pillar and a way to engage this topics with new audiences, also give a full context about what's really happening in Venezuela and how we, the civil society and front line defenders, are fighting against censorship and the persecution from the Maduro's regime.

ICT solutions for under siege Syria
(Roia NGO)

Speakers: Khaled Shabaan & Steve Dixon

How can you harness the power of ICT to help those living under an actively hostile regime, committed to repressing the human rights of its citizens?

Roia, a grassroots NGO, has been working since 2012 to address this question in the context of the Syrian conflict. This session will share the experiences of Roia in setting up alternative, secure communications infrastructure in besieged areas. Discussed will be the challenges, successes and lessons in connecting citizens and activists to the internet, establishing coordination communications systems for medical responders, and supporting livelihoods for youth through ICT freelancing.

Leadership in the Digital Age: a model for diverse, tech-savvy, empathetic leadership
(Ontario Digital Service)

Speakers: 
Katy Lalonde

In this Lightning Talk, Chief Digital Officer and Deputy Minister Responsible for Digital Government for the Province of Ontario, Hillary Hartley, will set out a new model for public service leadership.

Rooted in empathy and diversity, Hartley will challenge public and private sector leaders to embrace a new, more ‘flat’ approach to mobilizing teams and delivering meaningful outcomes for people. During her lightning talk, Hartley will outline the key skills required of leaders in an open, digital and inclusive organization operating in a digital age.

Human Rights are a concrete reality. How can we ensure that the digital world serves that reality?

Speakers: 
John Ralston Saul

The first digital wave seemed to favour human rights and freedom of expression. The second wave, which may be nearing its end, seems to have favoured authoritarianism. Is there a strategy for ensuring that a third digital wave will rebalance the digital phenomenon again in favour of human rights and freedom of expression?



Speakers
avatar for Hamed Behravan

Hamed Behravan

Executive Director, Movements.org
Leverage technology to empower civil society and human rights activists achieve their desired goals. Movements.org is our latest product. Some other project examples include providing circumvention technologies and digital safety training, virtually training human right defenders... Read More →
avatar for Steve Dixon

Steve Dixon

Communications Manager, Roia
Steven is the M&E Manager and acting Communications Manager at Roia, a small Syrian NGO working to harness the power of ICT for positive social impact. | | A background in international affairs, peacebuilding and development, Steven's work has taken him around the world for sev... Read More →



Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
205A

12:00

Digital inclusion in urban renewal: DIY toolkits for citizen inclusion & empowerment
Many citizens fear digital technologies. Mastering them can overcome fear. Creating your own networks raises awareness of the potential for social change since DIY Community Networks (CNs) have been shown to give voice and empower community roles to previously marginalized citizens. Urban renewal builds on resilience and trust at local level (digital inclusion, social innovation). This session links these technology and social innovation themes to focus on CNs. Empirical results are part of the €70 million CAPS R&D in H2020 funded by the European Commission. CN trials ran in 2017 using co-design methods to empower local communities by building trust, sharing data and problem-solving using collective intelligence for non-profit motives. The hands-on part of the session builds a DIY toolkit, combining community WiFi with FLOSS software. DIY toolkits are free and get people able to build and run their own hybrid, digital and physical spaces at sustainably low cost. Results show impact: collective awareness, social cohesion, conviviality. Despite the complexity of the task, and the unfair comparison with massively global commercial platforms (e.g. FANGS) DIY toolkits have a different flavor of value and personalized connectivity. Citizens can take back control. Empowerment evolves from a bottom-up 'how-to' approach. Inclusion will benefit from diversity and give-and-take collaborative work. The toolkit shows how to develop, design, use, customize. Mastering the fear of digital communication technologies such as these CNs helps young and old to be more engaged in both community politics and social issues.
H2020 project MAZI developed a toolkit using low-cost open HW and SW platforms (Raspberry Pi, Arduino, OpenWRT mini-routers, sensors and other IoT devices). You can deploy your own MAZI Zone using WiFi technology and customize it for local needs with the DIY guide (simple, does not require previous coding or internet access). CNs get groups to communicate, “feel” their local environment, self-organize or simply to get in touch with others in physical proximity, constantly acquiring the control of the data flows produced in their MAZI Zone.

At RightsCon 2018, two use cases built around hybrid space, FLOSS & DIY networking are shown. Participants will be able to follow the deployment and configuration of a local MAZI Zone or even try the process by themselves. Social scientists and lawyers conclude the session, by sharing expertise on policy and impact analysis of the role community nets in urban renewal.

MAZI project proposes an interactive session to engage participants in DIY networking setups. The mix of technology and community engagement is typical of digital social innovation. Empowering citizens to take control of the technology around them is one step to revitalize the socio-political communication context, reduces fear and digital exclusion, increases active participation in 'commons', and helps to understand why we need more privacy and decentralization of data.

Agenda  (75  mins): 
 - Welcome  and  general  introduction  of  the  workshop  and  the  MAZI  project,  Stavroula  Maglavera
- "Network  Self-determination:  Everyone  has  the  Right  to  Build  the  Internet",  Luca  Belli 
- "DIY  Civic  Intelligence:  Opportunities  and  Challenges",  Doug  Schuler
- Hands-on  tutorial  on  the  MAZI  toolkit,  Harris  Niavis
- "Next  Generation  Internet  Activities  in  the  European  Commission",  Loretta  Anania
- Sum-up  and  General  Discussion

Moderators
avatar for Stavroula Maglavera

Stavroula Maglavera

Research Engineer, University of Thessaly
I am Electrical and Computer Engineer, B.Sc and I focus on high-level coordination and on strategic developments. My main field of expertise in ICT and I gained expertise on designing and executing international scale events in ICT. My skills encompass exploitation, promotion, an... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Luca Belli

Luca Belli

Head of Internet Governance, Center for Technology and Society at FGV
Luca Belli, PhD is Senior Researcher at the Center for Technology and Society (CTS) of Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV), where he heads the Internet Governance project. Luca is also associated researcher at Centre de Droit Public Comparé of Paris 2 University. For those who do no... Read More →
avatar for Harris Niavis

Harris Niavis

Research Engineer, University of Thessaly


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
200B

12:00

Digital Rights for the Persecuted Refugees: Can there be a Global Support Framework?
The primary objective of this session is to highlight the plight of the forcefully displaced population and refugees globally through the lenses of Digital Inclusion and Freedom on the Internet. The goal is to come up with a proposal/a working plan for establishing a global framework to ensure equitable Digital Access for any refugee population. This session will focus on the challenges the Rohingya and Syrian refugee population are facing. 

Moderators
avatar for Faheem Hussain

Faheem Hussain

Faculty, School for the Future of Innovation in Society, Arizona State University
Faheem Hussain is a Digital Rights activist from Bangladesh, currently teaching in the School for the Future of Innovation in the Society (SFIS). His research interests encompass Digital Rights for Refugees, Digital Afterlife, and Women’s Empowerment using ICT. He holds a PhD i... Read More →

Speakers
HB

Hyra Basit

Digital Rights Foundation
avatar for Dragana Kaurin

Dragana Kaurin

Executive Director, Localization Lab
Dragana is a human rights researcher and ethnographer based in New York, and writes about refugees, forced migration, civic tech innovation, and digital security. She is the founder and director of Localization Lab, an organization that provides localization support and user feed... Read More →
avatar for Iffat Nawaz

Iffat Nawaz

Head of External Relations, BRAC
My career is deeply rooted in humanitarian and development aid. Most recently, I have served the Rohingya refugee crisis in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh as the Head of External Relations for BRAC. I piloted a project for World Food Program and the Emergency Telecom cluster on Services... Read More →
avatar for Dina Sabie

Dina Sabie

PhD student / Research Assistant, University of Toronto
I am a PhD student and a graduate research assistant at the University of Toronto. I received a H.B.Sc. from the University of Toronto in 2011 double majoring in Architectural Studies (Design) and Computer Science. I completed my Professional Master of Architecture in 2015 at the... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
201B

12:00

Women & Silicon Valley: How the Age of #MeToo Can Act as a Tipping Point
We’re living through a sea change when it comes to the harassment of women. There is rarely a day that goes by when a new case of sexual harassment is not on the cover of global newspapers. Indeed, major figures in media, entertainment, technology, and politics have had to step down over allegations of inappropriate behavior towards female colleagues.
 
In many ways, technology and women’s rights are uncomfortable bedfellows. Silicon Valley is notoriously dismissive of women in the workplace and women are often the targets of bullying and harassment on technology platforms. Indeed, a recent survey found that nearly all of the 200-plus senior women in tech who responded had experienced sexist interactions while at work. And yet, technology provides a platform for women that has largely been absent. This platform has contributed to the largest march for women’s rights the US has ever seen and to the spread of the #MeToo movement which has forced a global realization of the scale of abuse facing women.
 
As such, while technology companies themselves have been implicated in the harassment of women, could the industry be a key player in the fight for equality? This session will focus on the steps technology companies can take to ensure they become positive players in the women’s rights movement.

Moderators
avatar for Chloe Poynton

Chloe Poynton

Principal, Article One
Chloe is a Principal at Article One, a business & human rights consulting firm that works with companies, institutions, and state agencies to develop and implement strategies to promote corporate respect for human rights.

Speakers
avatar for Alexa Koenig

Alexa Koenig

Executive Director, Human Rights Center, UC Berkeley
Alexa is the executive director of the Human Rights Center (winner of the 2015 MacArthur Award for Creative and Effective Institutions) and a lecturer-in-residence at UC Berkeley School of Law, where she teaches classes on human rights and international criminal law. She co-chair... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
206C

12:00

Your Car the Pirate: How cars infringe copyright and deploy data
A car is as much a part of a driver’s identity as it is a means of travel. For many, their car has a soul of its own, and that soul is about to transform as more and more software finds its way under the dashboard. Assisted driving and autonomous cars will change the way we travel and commute but also how we interact with the road through the massive amount of information the cars’ systems will collect. From on-board entertainment to urban murals, we would like to map the future of cars and point to IP-related policy problems that may arise.
By presenting a car of the future we want to map the trends that will shape automotive industry in the next 5 to 10 years. We will examine what types of potentially copyrighted data a car like that would collect and what are the challenges related to that.
Through a discussion with the audience we will model possible best solutions that will balance out the rights of users, owners, and producers of these new, exciting vehicles.

Moderators
Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
201C

12:00

Wearing many hats: What is the future of online independent media - ideating and brainstorming
This is an interactive session focusing on the viability and feasibility of journalism in the digital age. Journalism is facing an existential crisis. Digital transformation, rapidly changing business models, surveillance and general mistrust are just some of the challenges media and journalists need to respond to. We aim to outline major trends and best practices that can be used as indicators of what the future of online media/journalism could look like and what do we need to do to see it succeed.

Key areas to be discussed
1. Governance: The model of journalism as a private business shows signs of decline, together with the erosion of media institutions credibility and trust issues, and insecurity of journalistic work with visible deterioration of information quality. Traditional media business often lack credibility because of perceived ties to government and wealthy elites.
Question for the session: What are the new models for producing journalism and organising journalists’ work that are seen as credible and trusted sources?

2. Relationship with audiences/citizens/communities: A small qualitative research of Zero Hora audiences in Brazil revealed that readers always want to know what the source the reports is, and editors were also asked to highlight the names of the reporters. They asked for depth, without judgment. They asked for transparency, agility, and commitment to the truth. They asked for daily perspectives and contextualisation. They asked for inspiring stories. They asked to be part of the stories and to know how they are made.
Question for the session: How is this new relationship between audiences and journalists shaping up and what are new successful models?

3. Business models/philanthropy: Subsidising journalism from advertising revenues is a broken model. We need to see more clearly journalists' role in the value chain of producing and distributing news compared to the role of technology companies. This question impacts the relationship journalists and media have with audience, advertisers and other stakeholders. As a result, we shall be able to reconfigure and reposition the business model and create sustainable business models that combine social value with our economic strength.
Question for the session: What are new business/funding models for journalism?

75-minute session, workshop format, aimed at bridging divides, creating networking opportunities, and looking past the problematising stage of journalism in a digital age to coming up with inspired and far-fetched new ideas and opportunities. The session also seeks to give participants an opportunity to vent and explore the current frustration over corporate and government controlled internet and media, and to think through new models and solutions that will help us create new ways of sharing news and creating journalism in the future.

Moderators
avatar for Susan Abbott

Susan Abbott

Independent Consultant
Susan Abbott is an independent consultant who specializes in working with non-profit organizations, universities, and donors in the areas of media development, civil society assistance, and digital rights. Abbott provides consulting services in the areas of fundraising and grant... Read More →
avatar for Mira Milosevic

Mira Milosevic

Executive Director, Global Forum for Media Development
Mira Milosevic is Executive Director of the Global Forum for Media Development, a network of more than 190 media development and journalism assistance organisations. Mira was a Director of Media Development Programmes at WAN-IFRA (World Association of Newspapers and News Publishe... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Michele Ernsting

Michele Ernsting

Program Director, RNW Media Citizen's Voice & Love Matters
Digital communities, youth inclusion, love, sex & relationships, data for advocacy, honey bees and campfires.
avatar for Lorena Jaume-Palasi

Lorena Jaume-Palasi

Founder & Executive Director, AlgorithmWatch
Lorena is the executive director of AlgorithmWatch, a non-profit organisation to evaluate and shed light on algorithmic and automatization processes that have a social relevance. Her work focuses on philosophy of law and ethics of automatization and digitization. Lorena has been... Read More →
avatar for Tom King

Tom King

Director, Aviso
I work with non-profit media and civil society organisations to help them grow, while aiming to identify and address the systemic challenges that get in the way of strengthening and expanding democracies and open societies. | | Currently, I am working on strategic development wi... Read More →
avatar for Mallory Knodel

Mallory Knodel

Head of Digital, ARTICLE 19
avatar for Daniel O'Maley

Daniel O'Maley

Associate Editor, Center for Intl Media Assistance
I'm the Associate Editor at the Center for International Media Assistance. My portfolio includes Internet policy and tech innovation. Anyone interested in publishing reports on these topics in terms of how they relate to media should get in touch with me.
avatar for Richard Wingfield

Richard Wingfield

Legal Officer, Global Partners Digital
Legal Officer, Global Partners Digital


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
204A

12:00

Whose news? Building a media industry that truly serves Canadians
Journalism in Canada and around the world is in crisis. It exists in an increasingly contested and chaotic environment, buffeted by political, technological and financial forces. Factors outside journalism’s direct control, such as social media giants cannibalizing media advertising revenue and U.S. hedge fund owners more concerned with profits than the public interest, are all exerting considerable influence. As a consequence, as news organizations cut back, or shut down altogether, not only are we losing journalism jobs and sources of
credible news, we are losing a source of community.

When communities lose news coverage, their members are less likely to volunteer, less likely to vote and less trusting of their neighbours. Add to this, a lack of accountability: who is providing a watchful eye over politicians when coverage evaporates? No one.

Who will step into this vacuum? The current deficit of reporting will be filled one way or another. In the US in particular we have witnessed the rise and extreme politicization of “fake news”. Could it take hold to the same extent in Canada? Alternatively, in this moment
we now have a significant opportunity to develop a media industry in Canada to better serve communities and be more representative of their interests.

Moderators
avatar for Elizabeth Dubois

Elizabeth Dubois

Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa

Speakers
avatar for Tim Fontaine

Tim Fontaine

Editor-in-Grand-Chief, Walking Eagle News
I'm a former reporter who founded the satirical and comedic website, Walking Eagle News - similar to The Onion and Beaverton, but with an Indigenous twist.
avatar for Anita Li

Anita Li

Director of Communities, The Discourse
Anita Li is the Director of Communities at The Discourse, an investigative journalism outlet, and Founder of The Other Wave, a website dedicated to covering media from a multicultural perspective. Prior to that, she served as Senior Editor at Fusion and as News Director at Comple... Read More →
avatar for Vinita Srivastava

Vinita Srivastava

Editor (culture, race, arts), The Conversation Canada
Vinita Srivastava is the Culture & Society editor of The Conversation Canada, working with scholars to bring together academic research and journalism with a critical race theory lens. Previously she was Assistant Prof. of Journalism at Ryerson University and the Director of Vers... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
203A

12:00

Combatting Shutdowns with COST: A Data Driven Policy Tool for Internet Freedom
Internet shutdowns cost globally about $2.4 billion USD and cause untold harm to trade, industry, and communities that rely on the free flow of information for growth and prosperity.

In this session, we will discuss and develop a concrete roadmap for the introduction of economic arguments into the day-to-day campaigning and policy-work using COST, a new data-driven policy tool that will automate the task of economic estimation. Our international panel brings together experts from legal, technology and policy backgrounds and invites active participation from the audience to better understand how a next-generation policy tool can impact internet freedom and digital rights community. How can we make policy work more visible to under-represented communities? How can we build advocacy tools that empower the general public?

Economic arguments have already proven to be a powerful tool to combat shutdowns in contexts where freedom of expression and other fundamental human rights are too often ignored, yet the numbers are difficult to produce hence rarely used when most needed.

COST, the Cost of Shutdown Tool, is a new technology initiative announced at the African Union Commission meeting in Addis Ababa by the Internet Society and NetBlocks.org built within the framework of the #KeepItOn campaign. It seeks to empower journalists, researchers, advocates, policy makers, businesses, and many others with economic arguments that make authorities listen.

Join us in the spirit of the UN Sustainable Development Goals and Internet Universality and as we find new ways to promote and leverage unrestricted Internet access as a driver of opportunities worldwide.

Moderators
avatar for Arzu Geybullayeva

Arzu Geybullayeva

Journalist, Freelance
Regional analyst, correspondent, and columnist. Former Vaclav Havel Journalism Fellow at Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFERL) and Central Asia Azerbaijan Fellow at George Washington University. Main areas of interest include human rights, advocacy, press freedom, and more rec... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Nighat Dad

Nighat Dad

Founder and Director, Digital Rights Foundation
avatar for Isik Mater

Isik Mater

Director of Research, TurkeyBlocks
Isik Mater is president of the Alternative Informatics Association and Research Director at media freedom watchdog Turkey Blocks. She is a digital activist and commentator on internet censorship, cyber-security and information warfare. Isik contributes to Turkish press agency Bia... Read More →
avatar for Peter Micek

Peter Micek

Global Policy & Legal Counsel, Access Now
avatar for Nicolas Seidler

Nicolas Seidler

Senior Policy advisor, The Internet Society
Nicolas Seidler is Senior Policy Advisor at the Internet Society. He joined the organization in February 2010 and currently leads ISOC’s work on Internet and Human Rights issues. He also engages in key global Internet governance issues and processes. | | Nicolas works with a... Read More →
avatar for Alp Toker

Alp Toker

Director of Technology, TVHI Media Lab - TurkeyBlocks
Alp is founder of the netblocks.org digital rights initiative and award-winning Turkey Blocks collective, and Sakharov Fellow for Freedom of Thought with the European Parliament. He works on freedom of expression online, digital transparency and policy tooling for internet govern... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
202B

12:00

It's My Data
Worried about giving away all your personal data in exchange for services and products? Do you want greater control over who uses your data, for what purpose, and for how long? Are you vulnerable to misuse or fraudulent use of your data? Do you want to wrest back agency over your privacy? Join our co-design workshop to design a new international Privacy Preference Standard.

Canada and the EU have proposed a privacy preference standard to the International Standards Organization. Five other countries are supporting this effort. This would allow you to assert your preferences regarding the use of your private data. The standard would be referenced in privacy regulations. It would replace the all-or-nothing service agreements that we currently sign --- because the fine print is too daunting, or we need the service and are given no choice.

You will help the project editor for the standard, Jutta Treviranus, and her team, draft the preferences that should be included in the standard. Collaborate in making the preference choices understandable, especially to people that are more vulnerable to misuse of their personal information. Contribute to drafting the policies that should guide the negotiation between the customer and the service.

This is a participatory co-design session. You will help shape a new international standard and regulated practice. After all, it's your data!

Moderators
avatar for Jutta Treviranus

Jutta Treviranus

Director, Inclusive Design Research Centre, OCAD University
Jutta Treviranus is the Director of the Inclusive Design Research Centre (IDRC), professor and director of an innovative graduate program in inclusive design at OCAD University Toronto.(http://idrc.ocadu.ca, http://www.ocadu.ca/programs/graduate_studies/inclusive_design.htm). The... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Jess Mitchell

Jess Mitchell

Sr. Manager Research + Design, Inclusive Design Research Centre OCAD University
I am lately most fascinated with the evolving world of design, in particular ethics and design. I spend most of my time in inclusion, diversity, and equity. And am deeply committed to empowering people and helping to shift their perspective.


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
201A

12:00

Young, Safe and Free: Respecting Children's Online Privacy and Freedom of Expression
This is chance to talk about practical steps that companies and public authorities can take to protect and empower children online. Companies and Data Protection Authorities will share how they consider risks to children's privacy online while still providing children with full, open and enriching online experiences. Civil society organizations will highlight the work that remains to be done, and academic researchers will ground this in evidence about how children exercise their rights to privacy and freedom of expression online.

Last year, we began a dialog on children's rights to privacy and freedom of expression at RightsCon. The GDPR will soon bring many changes, and UNICEF has recently published a Toolkit on Children's Online Privacy and Freedom of Expression to bring these issues to a global scale. This session will be an opportunity to highlight progress and pitfalls at a critical time, and create an open and transparent conversation about the challenges we all face in balancing children's rights in a digital world.

Moderators
SJ

Sarah Jacobstein

Child Rights & Business Specialist, UNICEF USA

Speakers
avatar for Jasmina Byrne

Jasmina Byrne

Jasmina Byrne is a senior researcher working in UNICEF Office of Research- Innocenti, Florence, Italy. She leads UNICEF's global research on children and the internet and have overseen and contributed to UNICEF studies related to child safety online, cyberbullying and child right... Read More →
avatar for Fred Carter

Fred Carter

Senior Policy & Technology Advisor, Privacy Commissioner / Ontario
My primary responsibilities are to provide strategic research, information, and advisory services to IPC commissioners and management on a wide range of technology and privacy policy issues. I am the principal author of many IPC publications dealing with online educational servi... Read More →
avatar for Sandra Cortesi

Sandra Cortesi

Director of Youth and Media, Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University
Children and young people
PH

Patrik Hiselius

Senior Advisor, Digital Rights, Telia Company
avatar for Natasha Jackson

Natasha Jackson

Head of Public Policy & Consumer Affairs, GSMA
AF

Ariel Fox Johnson

Senior Counsel, Common Sense Media


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
206B

12:00

(Not) Some Kinda Magic: Human Rights Impacts Assessments (HRIAs) for Infrastructure Providers and Business Actors
The majority of the Internet’s infrastructure is developed, operated, and maintained by private actors—Internet Service Providers (ISPs), registries, registrars, hosting providers, Internet exchange points, and content delivery networks, to name a few. Collectively, these companies have the power to safeguard the rights of end-users, or to propagate human rights abuses through their services and technologies. While some Internet infrastructure providers have begun to acknowledge their influence, the majority of these companies have yet to take concrete steps toward aligning their policies and practices with international human rights standards.

Human Rights Impact Assessments (HRIAs) are a useful tool in this context, intended to inform private actors of their potential impacts as well as provide concrete avenues toward mitigating negative effects. While there are systematic steps for conducting these HRIAs on transnational corporations in many fields, no such formula have been developed for examining the impacts of Internet infrastructure providers and other related companies… until now.

Drawing from case studies and ongoing efforts to jointly develop and implement HRIAs for Internet infrastructure providers, this Skills Seminar seeks to begin filling this gap by improving existing HRIA models to the specific functioning of technical Internet actors, and identifying new sectors that could benefit from this practice. Civil society, technical operators, and business actors alike are encouraged to join the conversation.

Moderators
avatar for Collin Kurre

Collin Kurre

Digital Programme Assistant, ARTICLE 19
I'm currently on a mission to develop new models for Human Rights Impact Assessments (HRIAs) specifically geared towards Internet infrastructure providers. I'm also active in the ICANN community, where I co-chair the Cross-Community Working Party on ICANN and Human Rights (CCWP-H... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Beth Goldberg

Beth Goldberg

Yale Graduate School
AR

Afsaneh Rigot

ARTICLE 19
Article 19 is a London-based human rights organization with a specific mandate and focus on the defense and promotion of freedom of expression and freedom of information worldwide founded in 1987. Afsaneh, works on Iran human rights issues in the MENA region, predominately freed... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
205B

12:00

Confronting Racism in Media: Online Hate Edition
Silicon Valley companies have long-denied responsibility for the bigotry that takes place on their platforms, allowing social media sites and web hosting services to become organizing hubs for white supremacist violence. These denials are reinforced by a news media and administration that minimizes or dismisses threats of violence perpetrated by white men while quickly labeling Muslims, immigrants and suspects of color as extremists or terrorists.

At the urging of consumers, civil rights groups and regulators, some of these companies have taken steps to reduce the harm on their platforms while others have made minimal efforts.

This session will discuss the ecosystem that has allowed these companies to deny their roles in promoting white supremacist organizing and violence, civil society efforts to urge companies to take responsibility for their platforms, and how these companies can, have, and should address these problems.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Brandi Collins-Dexter

Brandi Collins-Dexter

Senior Campaign Director, Color Of Change
Brandi serves as Senior Campaign Director for Color Of Change and oversees the Media, Democracy and Economic Justice department. In her tenure, she has led a number of successful corporate and government accountability campaigns including those that tackle online discrimination... Read More →
avatar for Joan Donovan

Joan Donovan

Media Manipulation/Platform Accountability Research Lead, Data & Society
avatar for Scott Simpson

Scott Simpson

Public Advocacy Director, Muslim Advocates
Scott Simpson is the Public Advocacy Director for Muslim Advocates and a faculty member at the Howard University School of Communications. He was formerly the media and campaigns director for the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights coalition of more than 200 national... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
204B

12:30

Accountability in times of digital governance: towards a global citizen charter
This session will examine various issues surrounding citizen rights and digital governance. It will discuss issues such as datafication, algorithmic decision making and the implications for marginalized groups, access deficits in realizing full participation, the influx of private actors and platforms in state functions and the accountability sought from them, and exclusions in digitized public service delivery, particularly in welfare. The workshop is designed as a participatory, outcome oriented exercise which will hopefully lead to a ‘global citizen charter for digital governance’.


Wednesday May 16, 2018 12:30 - 12:55
Village Main Stage

13:20

Nick and Nikki AMA: How to make your RightsCon experience great
Come join Nick Dagostino and Nikki Gladstone from the RightsCon team to get some tips on how to make your RightsCon experience great. 

Speakers
avatar for Nick Dagostino

Nick Dagostino

RightsCon Director, Access Now
Nick directs RightsCon, the world's leading event on human rights in the digital age. He's passionate about bringing people together to tackle the great issues at the intersection of technology, politics, rights, and societal change. Prior to joining Access Now, Nick was with the... Read More →
avatar for Nikki Gladstone

Nikki Gladstone

RightsCon Associate, Access Now
Nikki works on RightsCon, the world's leading summit on human rights in the digital age. She is excited about creating inclusive and accessible spaces for the digital rights community to drive change. Before Access Now, Nikki worked with the Wilson Center's Digital Futures Projec... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 13:20 - 14:00
205C
  • Host Organization Access Now

13:20

Remixable Graphics: Imagining educators as designers
This session will explore some of the thinking that went into the designs for the Security Education Companion (a teaching-oriented expansion of EFF’s Surveillance Self-Defense project: sec.eff.org). We will share some of the reasoning behind design decisions. For example, we will explore the vision for providing textless versions of graphics and for creating generic interfaces for non-existent tools. We will also explore what inclusion might mean on the device level: software people may have natively on their computers, what software users have exposure to, what accessibility constraints people might have, and so on.

In the remaining time, we will present the following problem for the audience: as content creators, how do we structure our materials so that our users (trainers and teachers) don’t need to know how to use proprietary software to remix, repurpose, translate and localize educational graphics and handouts? How do we make it as painless as possible for non-designers to easily remix instructional designs?
We will guide a design brainstorm with the audience about “remixable graphics” might mean for the future, and how to factor in users’ familiarity with tools. We would like this to be an active brainstorming session.

Moderators
Wednesday May 16, 2018 13:20 - 14:20
200B

13:20

Curbside Coaching: Silicon Valley & Toronto startups meet civil society
In 2011, the first RightsCon was held to explore human rights in the digital age. Each year since, the event has grown dramatically in size, scope and impact. In November 2017, Amnesty International launched its Silicon Valley Initiative to explore how technology can transform the human rights movement. Now at RightsCon 2018, Access Now and Amnesty are hosting a re-grounding session where participants explore what human rights / civil society organizations, Silicon Valley's tech giants and Toronto's burgeoning tech startup scene can learn from each other to counter threats to human rights and improve human rights protection.
Using a "curbside coaching" rotational format, this 60-minute lunchtime workshop pairs civil society and human rights organizations from around the world with large tech companies actively confronting human rights challenges and tech startups from Toronto's tech hub to explore what they can do to effectively address human rights threats. Addressing human rights violations will be only one aspect of the discussion -- we will also explore ways to improve the protection of human rights with technology innovation, whether it's through new forms of documentation and analysis, better organizing or finding practical solutions to human rights problems.
Through timed rotations at tables zoned by theme -- artificial intelligence, data-driven decision making and data-driven storytelling, Internet security, digital threats against civil society, cybersecurity capacity building and technical assistance, data protection, freedom of expression, Internet shutdowns, blockchain, etc -- attendees learn what is needed for the tech sector to embrace threat work, what has been effective, what doesn't work and what new collaborations can be explored.
A facilitator from Amnesty International and Access Now will be stationed at each table will capture best practices, lessons learned and new partnerships / collaborations surfaced during that table's discussion, and secure commitments from the table participants which collaboration they want to pursue post-RightsCon. This workshop will be a conversation-starter that sparks dialogue and connection through the three-day event.

Moderators
avatar for Danielle Cass

Danielle Cass

Silicon Valley Initiative Director, Amnesty International
How can technology transform the human rights movement

Speakers
avatar for Camille Francois

Camille Francois

Affiliate, Harvard Berkman-Klein Center for Internet & Society
Camille Francois is an Affiliate, Harvard Berkman-Klein Center for Internet & Society and Cybersecurity Fellow, New America Foundation. Previously, she was a Principal Researcher at Jigsaw, a think tank and technology incubator within Google / Alphabet, where she led an interdisc... Read More →
avatar for Brandie Nonnecke

Brandie Nonnecke

Postdoc; Research & Development Manager, UC Berkeley
CITRUS, UC Davis
avatar for Maaz Rana

Maaz Rana

Co-founder, Knockri (knockri.com)
Maaz Rana is an A.I tech enthusiast, futurist, and advocate of diversity and inclusion. He’s currently changing the way we choose the people we interview, and is adamant in helping eliminate unconscious hiring bias by establishing equitable hiring processes. He’s a Co-founde... Read More →
BS

Bernard Shen

Assistant General Counsel, Microsoft Corporation
avatar for Alissa Starzak

Alissa Starzak

Head of Public Policy, Cloudflare
avatar for Mark Surman

Mark Surman

Executive Director, Mozilla Foundation
avatar for Abby Vollmer

Abby Vollmer

Policy Manager, GitHub


Wednesday May 16, 2018 13:20 - 14:20
206A

13:30

Access Now Digital Security Clinic

The Digital Security Clinic is run by the staff of Access Now’s Digital Security Helpline, a free-of-charge resource for civil society around the world. We offer real-time, direct technical assistance and advice to activists, independent media, and civil society organizations. You can find out more about the Helpline at https://www.accessnow.org/help  

The Helpline will be holding open drop-in hours in the Access Now Lounge on the second floor from 1:30pm to 5pm on Wednesday and Friday, and from 9am to 1:30pm on Thursday. You can also arrange for a one-on-one appointment with a Helpline staff member throughout the conference by emailing help@accessnow.org.

The staff identify problems and help attendees implement practices that can protect them from threats. During an average visit, Clinic technologists:

1// Assess risks and needs

2// Analyze current practices

3// Troubleshoot problems

4// Provide tools and training to address emergent issues

5// Initiate cases with Access Now’s Digital Security Helpline for any issues not resolved on the spot

6// Refer to specialists where the Helpline is unable to assist


Wednesday May 16, 2018 13:30 - 17:00
Access Now Lounge
  • Host Organization Access Now

14:30

Cost of Freedom in Syria
In this talk, Noura Ghazi, discusses the past present and future of human rights in Syria, from over 1,000 cases she administered as an international lawyer. From growing up with a father arbitrarily detained to daily trips to Adra Prison to visit her belated husband, Bassel Khartabil, later disappeared and ultimately executed, Noura, discusses the current status of Human Rights in Syria, and the incalculable COST of freedom.

http://nouraghazi.org

Speakers
avatar for Noura Ghazi

Noura Ghazi

Noura Ghazi is an International lawyer. Her work is internationally known and has been covered by major media globally. She studied law at Damascus University. She lives and works in Damascus, Syria.


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 14:55
Village Main Stage

14:30

Artificial Intelligence: Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems and Peace Time Threats
We are on the verge of one of the greatest paradigm shifts in human history. Research on Artificial Intelligence is enabling humanity to create autonomous intelligent software agents that can currently perform and learn new tasks without human guidance, observation or intervention, supplanting humans in decision­ making processes. This is already the case for military weapons platforms know as Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems (LAWS) that can kill and destroy a target without human intervention. There are however also a plethora of peace time uses and risks of autonomous agents including potential mass disinformation, criminal profiling and the potential management of population amid resource scarcity to name a few. The panel aims to address some of the following questions:
" What if fake news and internet trolls are generated by increasingly autonomous software?
" Would autonomous criminal profiling turn the presumption of Innocence upside-down?
" If code represents the law of cyberspace, and computer software potentially interferes with citizens' rights and integrity, shouldn't their use be regulated by a democratic process?
" The language of human vs. machine decision-making: are we blurring important distinctions?
" Do we have a moral duty not to create 'intelligent' systems that could potentially become a risk for humanity?

This session is organized by the ICT for Peace Foundation and the Zurich Hub for Ethics and Technology, Switzerland, as part of an on-going process of looking at AI, LAWS and Peace-time threats

Moderators
avatar for David Kirkpatrick

David Kirkpatrick

Editor-in-chief, Techonomy Media
David Kirkpatrick is a journalist, author, and founder of Techonomy Media. Its conferences gather leaders to discuss how tech changes everything. Techonomy 2018 is Nov. 11-13, 2018 in Half Moon Bay, California. In 2016, Mark Zuckerberg made there his notorious remarks about fake... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Todd Davies

Todd Davies

Academic Research and Program Officer, Stanford University
I am a social scientist whose work over the past 17 years has focused on the relationships between digital technologies, group deliberation, rights and freedoms, and democratic decision making. Previous work focused on machine learning and knowledge representation in artificial i... Read More →
avatar for Kyle Dent

Kyle Dent

Research Area Manager, PARC
I am an AI researcher and data scientist studying the interplay between people and technology. I lead research and innovation projects and am interested in technology and society, intelligent conversational agents, and complex systems.
avatar for Maarten Van Horenbeeck

Maarten Van Horenbeeck

Board Member, FIRST.Org, Inc.
Maarten Van Horenbeeck is Board Member and former Chairman of the Forum of Incident Response and Security Teams (FIRST). He also works as Chief Information Security Officer for Zendesk. Prior to this, he managed the Threat Intelligence team at Amazon and worked on the Security te... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
206B

14:30

Some Like it Bot: Can AI Strengthen Global Democracy?
Bot-based smart automation and artificial intelligence is rapidly transforming the ways in which citizens go about their daily lives - from the way we learn languages, to obtaining medical advice, to having our own personal virtual assistants. But how can bots also effectively help citizens engage with or hold accountable their governments and political institutions? This session will explore different bot-based approaches that seek to reduce barriers between governments and citizens to strengthen communication, improve government transparency and facilitate reporting on problems or abuses for increased accountability. Panelists will give a short overview of their specific projects, articulating both the successes and challenges of developing and deploying bot-based platforms, with a diverse range of purposes. Afterward, a moderated discussion will attempt to address some of the following questions, based on both panelist experience and audience input:

- What are the implications of bots for democracy activists or human rights advocates?
- With bots becoming prevalent across social media platforms, how can governments use them to bypass more archaic communication structures to be more responsive to citizens?
- What unique impacts do voice and messenger bots have for conducting advocacy?
- How can we overcome known pitfalls to using bots as a replacement for a human counterpart?
- How do bots make politics more human?
- Can a bot still be considered a success if it simply improves technology performance without impacting engagement levels or improving ideological differences?
- What experiences have others had in deploying them as a means of bypassing bureaucracy?

Although bots used for civic engagement are becoming more prevalent, we are still in the early days of evaluating impact and determine metrics to measure their success. This session aims to build a more robust community of practice around this field, offering concrete suggestions, recommendations, and resources that can be used by both those thinking about creating their own “bot for good” as well as experienced bot developers or implementers.

Moderators
avatar for Sarah Moulton

Sarah Moulton

Senior Technology Innovation Analyst, National Democratic Institute

Speakers
avatar for Chris Doten

Chris Doten

Chief Innovation Officer, National Democratic Institute (NDI)
Super interested in global politics and tech - how do you help individuals organize for more democratic societies, and how do you help political institutions keep up with their people as they get swamped by the tech tsunami? | | Lead for DemTools initiative (https://dem.tools... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Dubois

Elizabeth Dubois

Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
204B

14:30

"The last DNS bastion: .amazon"
The subject of the session is the dispute regarding the .amazon new gTLD domain name extension between the company Amazon and members of the Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC) within the process that ICANN leads for the creation, delegation and sale of new generic domain names ( new gTLDs).
The session seeks to encourage a discussion between panelists with different positions on who is more entitled to own the domain name extension .amazon. The company Amazon? The governments of Amazonian countries? The inhabitants of the Amazon?

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Salvador Camacho

Salvador Camacho

CEO, Kalpa Protección Digital
Founder & CEO at @KalpaPD | IP and Domain Names Attorney|Entrepreneur|Speaker|President of Domains Committee at @AMDImx |@ISOC & @SIG_ObJuventud Member|Domainer | Twitter @SCH_IP


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
200C

14:30

Tech Demo Block #1: Data management and visualization
Don't build Infra, Build Applications (AMD Conseil)

Speakers: 
Amine Ben Asker

The session aims to help small organization build their private Cloud infrastructure using Openstack over linux on Baremetal servers. Security in the cloud is a nightmare for Developers and Civil society members.

Once the infra is built, it can be shared between organizations to assure High availability and optimal usage of machines. I am working on this project for the moment and planning to release first stable version of it in the RightsCon. The project is based on blockchain, an innovative way to enhance trust among organizations’ infrastructures.

New tools for visualizing communities, projects, and resources: Inspiring engagement and exploration (Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University)

Speakers: Sandra Cortesi

In this tech demo, we will present interactive tools that have been developed at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University to visualizing communities, projects, and resources. (No technical background is needed to join this session.)

Making maps work for you (Mapbox)

Speakers: 
Marena Brinkhurst

We will showcase of examples of how Human Rights organizations, Humanitarian actors, and others work for positive social impact are using Mapbox tools to visualize data, inform programming, and amplify communications and campaigns. The demo will start with an overview of the Mapbox ecosystem and then illustrate how to combine Mapbox tools and data to create interactive maps for web and mobile. The demo will also promote OpenStreetMap and other open data and open source communities that Mapbox is part of, highlighting how these efforts connect with and support those working in Human Rights and Humanitarian sectors. We will have time for questions and discussion of use cases after the demo.

RIWI: A New Way to Capture Global Citizen Perception Data (RIWI Corp.)

Speakers: Eric Meerkamper

What will you ask the world? Join RIWI to collaborate on designing the very first AccessNow - RIWI Global Digital Human Rights Index, which will reach over 100,000 people in over 100 countries.

This interactive, fishbowl style session will explore the possibility of using global perception data for work in the digital rights space. We will discuss how leveraging a new and innovative technology can enrich understanding and increase effectiveness when addressing problems related to human rights and citizen engagement.

This session is for you if you are eager to: contribute ideas for the Index, influence how global digital rights are understood, or learn about an innovative methodology that enables citizens all around the world to have their voices heard.

The Right Chat for RightsCon (New America's Open Technology Institute)

Speakers: 
Ross Schulman 

Centralized chat services that keep your data then charge you for it are so 2017. Meet Matrix! A federated, end-to-end encrypted communications service that can bridge into many of your favorite chat platforms.

Speakers
avatar for Amine Ben Asker

Amine Ben Asker

Cloud Architect, Independent
Computer doctor
avatar for Marena Brinkhurst

Marena Brinkhurst

Community Team Program Manager, Mapbox
Marena supports non-profits and positive impact projects to use Mapbox tools and connects the Mapbox team with volunteer opportunities. Before joining Mapbox, Marena worked for the non-profit Namati on efforts to secure customary and indigenous land rights in Africa and Asia and... Read More →
avatar for Sandra Cortesi

Sandra Cortesi

Director of Youth and Media, Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University
Children and young people
avatar for Eric Meerkamper

Eric Meerkamper

Global Head, Citizen Engagement, RIWI Corp.
Eric is the Global Head of Citizen Engagement at RIWI, based in Toronto. | | RIWI is a global survey technology and sentiment analysis firm that gathers citizen opinion data and accelerates engagement initiatives in every country in the world using its patented technology. To d... Read More →
avatar for Ross Schulman

Ross Schulman

Senior Policy Technologist, New America's Open Technology Institute
Ross Schulman is a senior counsel and senior policy technologist at New America’s Open Technology Institute, where he focuses on internet measurement, emerging technologies, surveillance, and decentralization. Prior to joining OTI, Schulman worked for Google in Mountain View, C... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
200A

14:30

Techquity: Ensuring the Future is Shaped by Diverse Innovators
From the diversity breakdowns provided in the annual diversity reports of the major technology firms (Apple, Facebook, Google and Microsoft) to the “Google Memo” of Summer 2017, it is clear that despite ongoing diversity and inclusion initiatives undertaken by tech sector firms, underrepresented voices have yet to be meaningfully represented within the sector, particularly within positions of leadership.

The impact of this ongoing disparity is far reaching, impacting employment trajectories for underrepresented communities, missing opportunities to harness innovative new ideas that come from a diverse workforce and producing products and platforms impacting our daily lives that reflect a limited set of lived experiences in their design and function.

Conversations around these trends, barriers and missed opportunities are occurring at a moment in time when equity, respect and the dismantling of privilege are at the forefront of our societal consciousness – from national conversations such as reconciliation in Canada to movements that span across borders (Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, LGBTQ2S Rights), activists, allies, community leaders and practitioners are helping to reimagine and reshape our socioeconomic landscape.

Within such a transformative period, how can those working to address issues of equity in tech come together to collectively build upon our diverse strengths and experiences to help shape the digital platforms, products and experiences of tomorrow? This will not be your average “diversity and inclusion” panel, but rather an opportunity for those already active in the space to develop tangible takeaways and action items that can help to accelerate their efforts to create a more equitable and inclusive technology sector.

Speakers
avatar for Kara Andrade

Kara Andrade

Innovation Specialist, Counterpart
Kara is the Innovation Specialist for Counterpart International's Innovation for Change Initiative which supports and starts-up regional innovation hubs in 6 regions: Latin America and the Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, Africa, South Asia, Central Asia, and East Asia an... Read More →
avatar for Alejandro Mayoral Baños

Alejandro Mayoral Baños

Executive Director, Indigenous Friends Association
Alejandro Mayoral Banos is an Indigenous activist and Ph.D.Candidate, who is currently working with organizations in Canada and Mexico deploying participatory and community-driven ICT projects by/with/for Indigenous peoples. He is the creator and founder of the Indigenous Friends... Read More →
avatar for Chief R. Stacey Laforme

Chief R. Stacey Laforme

R. Stacey Laforme is the elected Chief of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation (MNCFN). Born and raised on MNCFN, Chief Laforme has served his community for over fifteen years, being first elected to council in 1999. Chief Laforme has participated in a number of commi... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
200B

14:30

Online Criticism, Falsified Court Orders & the Role of Intermediaries: Coping With Takedown Requests of Questionable Legitimacy.
Lumen is a research project located at Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, devoted to collecting and analyzing requests to remove online materials. The API-searchable database includes includes requests for removal based on different concerns ranging from copyright, privacy and trademark to “revenge porn” and defamation, submitted by individual senders or recipients, including Internet providers and hosts such as Google, Twitter, Wikipedia, Wordpress, and others.

Recently, researchers and advocates including Professor Eugene Volokh of UCLA School of Law, in part through work with the Lumen database, have uncovered an alarming pattern of falsified court orders being used to seek and often achieve the removal of online material, most often reviews and criticism. If even court orders cannot presumptively be viewed as valid, what recourse is there for OSPs, and other online actors?

The Lumen team will would like to open the workshop with a brief introduction to Lumen and to the site’s API. Once the attendees are usefully familiar with Lumen, we will facilitate an open discussion about the implications of falsified court orders within the takedown request landscape, initiated by a short presentation from Profesor Volokh on his ongoing research. Relatedly, we would like to discuss the possible research opportunities Lumen’s database affords re: court orders and on other fronts; how Lumen can both facilitate such research and expand the research community using it; ways in which we might most successfully seek out other sources of notices, especially court orders, to make the database more comprehensive and useful; and finally, what improvements for the site the project might focus on in 2018. The session will be facilitated by Lumen team members, but will be centered around engaging our participants' opinions and expertise on this topic, and how Lumen can better facilitate research and advocacy concerning takedowns in light of the existence of falsified court orders.


Moderators
avatar for Christopher Bavitz

Christopher Bavitz

Clinical Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
avatar for Adam Holland

Adam Holland

Project Manager, Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society
| | | Adam is a Project Manager at the Berkman Center, where he works primarily on the Lumen project, but also assists with a variety of other initiatives. His research interests include notice and takedown regimes, copyright law; online intermediary liability, legal regulati... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Daphne  Keller

Daphne Keller

Director of Intermediary Liability, Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society
Daphne's work at Stanford CIS focuses on legally mandated notice and takedown systems, and how they affect Internet users' rights. She previously worked on the frontlines of this issue as Google's Associate General Counsel for Intermediary Liability. | Her work covers issues ou... Read More →
EV

Eugene Volokh

Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
202B

14:30

Is illicit sharing the imperative future for educational access?
Copyright protections continue to be ratcheted up around the world, in service of powerful incumbent rights holders, and to the detriment of users, educators, students, researchers, and the public. With ever higher costs to education, especially regarding the pricing of crucial learning materials like textbooks research articles, how can students get access to the learning materials they need? There has been some important advances in practice and policy around supporting open educational resources, but, at least for the time being, their adoption is limited, due to the pressure from commercial market players, and the slowness of state-level policy changes.

Because of these conditions, students, teachers, and researchers are taking matters into their own hands to get access (and to share) educational materials that were always meant to be distributed widely—were it not for the artificial restrictions placed on them by copyright law. But these communities are putting themselves in the crosshairs of the law when they do so. We see students like Diego Gómez, a scientist from Colombia who for the last three years has been criminally prosecuted for sharing an academic paper online. We get situations where copy shops in India and Uruguay have been threatened to be shut down because their owners were making unsanctioned reproductions of educational materials. And we get the story of Sci-Hub, the rogue repository that offers free access to the majority of scientific research articles around the world—and has had several stinging judgments levied against it.

In our session, we will examine these and other cases, and discuss ideas around improving access to educational materials for the benefit of teaching and learning, and the public interest. We will do this by exploring various opportunities for policy work and advocacy, including law reform (such as educational exceptions to copyright), popular campaigning in defense of students and access to information, and techniques being used to share educational materials openly on the web. An intended outcome is to promote the formation of ongoing digital activists around this issue, including student populations.

Moderators
avatar for Timothy Vollmer

Timothy Vollmer

Senior Manager, Public Policy, Creative Commons
Right now I work on public policy issues at Creative Commons. I also ride bikes and bake bread.

Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
204A

14:30

The right to record, perpetrator video, and human rights
In this panel we’ll discuss the legal basis for the right to record, the ethics of
using and sharing perpetratror video and propaganda, and how companies
are handling this material, as well as highlight ways individuals and
organizations are fighting for this right.

This is more timely than ever, as video occupies more and more space
in human rights work. In 2017, video shifted public opinion in vast
ways, and even led to public reckonings for police and military
officers. Videos of police violence in favelas led to unprecedented
charges against military police in Rio de Janeiro. Police Officer
Michael Slager, who shot African-American Walter Scott in his back as
he ran away and was caught on a cellphone, pled guilty in a civil
rights case. And the ICC issued its first ever arrest warrant based
only on videos on social media. International human rights law
supports the principle that people have the right to record public
officials carrying out their duties in public . But domestic laws in
countries around the world make recording the police, military, and
even legislatures difficult, if not illegal. Even in places where the
right is protected, such as South Africa and the United States, people
regularly face intimidation, arrest, physical violence, and
destruction of their footage, photos, and devices.

This is partly why so-called “perpetrator video”- footage of abuses
created by the perpetrators themselves- is becoming increasingly
important for the International Criminal Court and other war crimes
prosecutions. But these videos are falling victim to underresourced
content enforcement teams and overzealous machine learning in even
greater numbers than eyewitness video and news purposefully created to
show abuses.

International law supports the right to record. And international
bodies are increasingly calling for human rights videos on public
platforms to be preserved. But are these videos coming from? And will
they keep coming? Will the right people have access to them? This
panel will examine these questions- and what happens next.

Moderators
DK

Dia Kayyali

Program Manager, tech + advocacy, WITNESS
Dia Kayyali coordinates WITNESS’ tech + advocacy work, engaging with technology companies and working on tools and policies that help human rights advocates safely, securely and ethically document human rights abuses and expose them to the world.

Speakers
avatar for Dragana Kaurin

Dragana Kaurin

Executive Director, Localization Lab
Dragana is a human rights researcher and ethnographer based in New York, and writes about refugees, forced migration, civic tech innovation, and digital security. She is the founder and director of Localization Lab, an organization that provides localization support and user feed... Read More →
avatar for Peter Micek

Peter Micek

Global Policy & Legal Counsel, Access Now


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
206A

14:30

When the government goes phishing. State-sponsored phishing and disinformation campaigns.
That will be a 1-hour panel on recent investigations explaining the involvement of Russian security services (such as GRU and FSB) in physhing attacks that are followed by disinformation campaigns . The aim of it is raising awarenes on the government involvement in phishing and disinformation campaigns, promoting exchange of experience of monitoring this kind of actibities in different countries, joint efforts for finding solutions to resist governmental phishing and disinformation attacks.

Moderators
avatar for Eva Galperin

Eva Galperin

Director of Cybersecurity, EFF
Eva Galperin is EFF's Director of Cybersecurity. Prior to 2007, when she came to work for EFF, Eva worked in security and IT in Silicon Valley and earned degrees in Political Science and International Relations from SFSU. Her work is primarily focused on providing privacy and sec... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Roman Dobrokhotov

Roman Dobrokhotov

Editor-in-Chief, The Insider
Roman Dobrokhotov is a Moscow-based journalist and civil activist. He is the editor-in-chief of investigative online newspaper The Insider. He has a PhD in political science.
avatar for Alexis Dorais-Joncas

Alexis Dorais-Joncas

Security Intelligence Team Lead, ESET
Hired by ESET in 2010, Alexis Dorais-Joncas worked as a Malware Researcher, then as Security Intelligence Team Lead. In 2015, Alexis Dorais-Joncas was appointed head of ESET’s R&D branch office located in Montreal. He and his team focus on cutting edge malware research, network... Read More →
avatar for Cosimo Mortola

Cosimo Mortola

Analyst, Information Operations, FireEye
Cosimo is an analyst on the Information Operations team at FireEye; his work focuses on tracking Russian disinformation and associated cyber threat activity.


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
206C

14:30

Community networks: discussing comparative solutions to remove regulatory obstacles
To report on conflict, journalists need sources, verified information and visuals in order to accurately report what is happening in conflict zones. In the case of Sudan, there is not much visual evidence on online and social media available, which is different than the conflict in Syria where hours of conflict are recorded and published. In Sudan people share information, photos and videos on more closed of channels: the Sudanese Radio Dabanga, a project of Free Press Unlimited, is one of the first to tap into this: https://www.freepressunlimited.org/en/blog/journalism-through-chat-media. This resulted in a daily flow of over thousand messages shared with the radio station. Without people reporting on the bombings in the Darfur Jebel Marra area or sending visuals of demonstrations turning violent, nobody will know these human rights abuses are happening.

Together with Humanity X, the innovation lab of Leiden University, Radio Dabanga is working to create an open source digital tech solution: a chatbot that filters incoming messages and talk to the audiences about what they report to Radio Dabanga. This chatbot will be used by Radio Dabanga's journalists to parse and filter the most important information and visuals as well as prompt the submitter with additional questions to better understand the situation being reported. We have developed a rule based chat engine and adapters for various chat platforms, adhering to data responsibility. By prompting and securing digital documentation relating to the conflict in Sudan, Radio Dabanga can report important information more effectively.

In this engaging fishbowl session, team members of the chatbot project will showcase the chatbot that is the result of the collaboration between Humanity X and Radio Dabanga. To start with, an overview will be given of where the project stands now including a short overview of Radio Dabanga’s work and a description of their daily struggles to report on the conflicts in Sudan.
* This introduction will primarily look into how an open source technical solution can be used effectively in a conflict context, where human rights are abused.
* The talk will dig deeper into the technical features of the chatbot ‘s prototype build by Humanity X, including the questions, message complexity, analyzing texts and it will showcase the prototype.
* We will also describe the process of the collaboration between Humanity X and Radio Dabanga to create secure online communication channels and the opportunities to make this open-source chatbot for massive engagement available for other organizations, through scaling up. The open source chatbot can be used by other media houses, humanitarian & human rights organizations, which will increase their capacity to communicate with their audiences. This chatbot aims to be a widely used tool that uses audience engagement to demand accountability against perpetrators of the conflict. 

Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
206D
  • Host Organization Free Press Unlimited, Radio Dabanga

14:30

Shedding light on Internet Blackouts
An Internet blackout happens when the connectivity of a particular region or even a whole country is completely disrupted.

This panel will bring together the technical and social perspectives of this phenomenon. We will be explaining how we can gain a technical understanding of how internet blackouts happen, why they happen through a contextual analysis and who are most affected by them. Some of the panelists have first person experience dealing with and responding to internet blackouts, while others are working on developing a technically sound methodology for measuring blackouts when they occur.

We will give an overview of the state of the art and present some of the findings from the past years.

Moderators
avatar for Maria Xynou

Maria Xynou

Open Observatory of Network Interference (OONI)
Maria works with the Open Observatory of Network Interference (OONI), a free software project that aims to increase transparency of internet censorship around the world. | | She manages OONI's partnerships, engaging human rights communities worldwide with censorship measurement... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Arturo Filastò

Arturo Filastò

Project Lead, OONI
avatar for Julie Owono

Julie Owono

Executive Director, Internet Sans frontières
I work at the intersection of Tech, Human Rights, Business. | I am a lawyer, and the Executive Director of Internet Without Borders, an organisation defending digital rights, and an open Internet for all.


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
201B

14:30

How to start using data analytics to grow your organization's impact...today!
Data is a big part of acting in an informed way in order to make better decisions for your organization. So if you’re serious about solving human rights problems, you need to be serious about getting and analyzing data. Data analysis is a powerful tool for improving social causes, making cases to donors, and wisely using limited resources. However, many human rights organizations around the world aren’t using data either because they don’t think their organization has the technical and financial capacity, they don’t know what questions to ask, or they don’t know where to find the data. The good news is: if you have Excel and know which questions to ask, you can do data analysis!

In this workshop, participants will gain a concrete understanding of how data collection and analysis can improve the reach, resource efficiency, and impact of their organizations. The workshop will begin with a discussion of how data collection and analysis is done. The facilitator will then work on the cases of 3 participant organizations working in different areas. He will work with the group to discover strategies for how these specific organizations can frame questions for data analysis, collect the data, and then analyze the data to learn important information about their organization. He will also cover how data analysis can help organizations improve their fundraising capacities through (1) targeting fund-raising efforts (i.e., when soliciting donations from the public, improving engagement) and (2) using data analytics to make a compelling argument for a cause based on data. All participants will then work in small groups and be guided through a brainstorm on ways that they can start using data within their own organization. They will leave the workshop with new reflexes and tangible tools of how to incorporate data analysis into their operations.

Moderators
avatar for Derek Ruths

Derek Ruths

Chief Architect, Charitable Analytics International
Derek Ruths is co-founder of CAI, a charity focused on bringing the power of data science to social good initiatives. He is also Associate Professor of Computer Science at McGill University, and the Director of the McGill Centre for Social and Cultural Data Science. In these ca... Read More →

Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
206D

14:30

Lightning Talks: The State of Mass Surveillance 2018
Mass Spying 2018 (Electronic Frontier Foundation)

Speakers: Cindy Cohn

Where are we in the fight against mass surveillance? Now that the US authority has been renewed, I'll provide an update on the litigation challenges in the U.S. and Europe and hopefully lead a conversation about how to continue to raise concerns around the world.

Protecting Our Own: Special Rights Just for US (Center for Democracy & Technology)

Speakers: 
Greg Nojeim

This lightning talk calls into question the continued utility and wisdom of limiting strong human rights protections in surveillance regimes to nationals of the country conducting surveillance, and to domestic as compared to foreign surveillance.

Many countries give their own nationals special rights when it comes to surveillance and data demands that target their own nationals. For example, Germany recently enacted legislation its citizens the highest protections, citizens of the EU an intermediate level of protection, and citizens of every other country a low level of protection. And, when the United States reauthorized the “PRISM” program, which targets people outside the US, much of the debate focused not on the rights of the 100,000 targets, but on the rights of U.S. citizens who may communicate with them.

Some protections may apply only to domestic-to-domestic communications or to people located within the geographic boundaries of the country. In a world where communications between two individuals in one country may pass through a third country, and where surveillance techniques do not readily permit an assessment of the nationality of the communicants, does it make sense for countries to extend strong human rights protections just to their own citizens or just to "domestic" communications? This lightning talk will explore alternative approaches that raise the rights of non-citizens located outside the country conducting the surveillance.

IMSI Catchers: The Problems We Can & Cannot Resolve (Center for Democracy and Technology)

Speakers: Mana Azarmi

This talk will explain what the technology is, and outline the problems with associated with them that can and cannot be resolved.

Keeping a Low Profile? Technology, Risk and Privacy Among Undocumented Immigrants (School of Information, University of Michigan)

Speakers: Tamy Guberek

Surveilling Surveillance: An Intro to Data Security & Data Justice in Canada and the UK (Toronto Legal Hackers; Politai)

Speakers: Joanna Lehrer

A comparison between data security measures in the European Union and Canada.

Speakers
avatar for Tamy Guberek

Tamy Guberek

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Michigan School of Information
Intersection of human rights, data and technology. Research focuses on use of statistics in human rights advocacy and decision-making, online privacy behaviors of vulnerable communities and NGOs, data transparency and communicating uncertainty, digital security education.
avatar for Joanna Lehrer

Joanna Lehrer

Founder (Lawyer), Politai
Collective data ownership and strategic use; collective civilian rights compensation; standardized geospatial coordinates, especially as a means to parse and distribute contextually relevant legal information and advocacy tips in the public domain, or for supported self-monitorin... Read More →
avatar for Greg Nojeim

Greg Nojeim

Director, Project on Freedom, Security and Technology, Center for Democracy & Technology
Cybersecurity, surveillance, United States surveillance laws, ECPA, cross border law enforcement demands for Internet users' communications, encryption



Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
205A

14:30

Unravelling the cloak of secrecy: Oversight and accountability of intelligence

In this session, we will bring together panellists from the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA), the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, the Canadian Security Intelligence Review Committee, the U.S. Office of the Director of National Intelligence, each of whom is an expert in issues relating to privacy, digital rights and oversight of intelligence services. The discussion will be moderated by Amie Stepanovich, U.S. Policy Manager at Access Now.

The panellists, briefly drawing upon their experiences from Canada and the United States will discuss the importance of effective oversight as an indispensable safeguard for reviewing the activities of the intelligence services and upholding the rule of law. Following a presentation on the critical comparative EU research findings of the recently published (October 2017) second surveillance report (Surveillance by intelligence services: fundamental rights safeguards and remedies in the EU), which will bring an European Union comparative perspective to the debate, emphasis will be placed on the institutional guarantees that oversight mechanisms need to incorporate in order to be independent, efficient and transparent. Contemporary challenges for oversight bodies, which arise from a field traditionally shrouded in secrecy, such as limited powers, access to intelligence files, resources and expertise, will be thoroughly discussed. Finally, the debate will touch upon oversight bodies’ competence over international intelligence sharing, as a means of tackling gaps of accountability and ensuring robust supervision throughout the whole spectrum of the intelligence process.

Panellists will exchange ideas, share empirical findings and, in collaboration with active participants in the audience, work toward articulating innovative approaches as well as new collaborations and strategies for responding to challenges faced by many states. The panellists will launch the discussion, but the substantive session is designed to be very interactive, and will solicit engagement and concrete, solutions-­oriented feedback from key participants in the audience. This will include, among others, human rights lawyers, NGO activists, technologists, privacy commission experts, or government officials.

In light of the recently published (October 2017) second volume of the FRA Report on surveillance (Surveillance by intelligence services: fundamental rights safeguards and remedies in the EU), which provides critical comparative research findings from the surveillance fieldwork and will be disseminated to participants, various examples from Europe, Canada and New Zealand will be thoroughly examined. Through an interactive discussion, participants will be sensitised to the challenges rooted in the habitual practice of the intelligence services and will investigate, together with panellists, good practices and concrete solutions for achieving robustness without compromising national security or circumventing human rights.

Moderators
avatar for Amie Stepanovich

Amie Stepanovich

U.S. Policy Manager, Access Now

Speakers
avatar for Pierre Blais

Pierre Blais

Pierre Blais was appointed on May 1, 2015, as Chairman of the Security Intelligence Review Committee (SIRC). Mr. Blais was born in Berthier-sur-Mer, on December 30, 1948. He is the son of Edmond Blais and Marguerite Mercier. He attended Collège Ste-Anne-de-la-Pocatière an... Read More →
avatar for Alexander Joel

Alexander Joel

Chief, Office of Civil Liberties, Privacy, and Transparency, Office of the Director of National Intelligence
Alex Joel is the Chief of the Office of Civil Liberties, Privacy and Transparency (CLPT) for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI). CLPT works to ensure that the U.S. Intelligence Community carries out its national security mission in a manner that protects p... Read More →
avatar for Mario Oetheimer

Mario Oetheimer

Head of Sector Information Society, Privacy, Data Proteciton, EUROPEAN UNION AGENCY FOR FUNDAMENTAL


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
203B

14:30

Human rights due diligence in telecommunications – is the current practice the good practice?
The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights indicate that businesses should carry out due diligence in order to identify, prevent, mitigate and account for how they address human rights impacts. Over the past year, telecommunications companies have begun to publish more detailed information about their approach to human rights due diligence, with some even publishing full impact assessment reports. This interactive discussion will review some of the lessons that telecommunications companies have learned from conducting due diligence. We will seek consensus on some good practices and explore whether current practice is consistent with stakeholder expectations.

Questions to be addressed:

When is the right time to conduct a human rights impact assessment? When should a company use external experts to conduct due diligence, and when will internal resources suffice? How can due diligence be effectively built into a company’s day-to-day operations? What are some of the lessons learned in recent human rights due diligence activities?

Moderators
avatar for Michael Samway

Michael Samway

President, The Business and Human Rights Group
Michael Samway is president of The Business and Human Rights Group, where he advises technology companies on ethical decision-making regarding free expression, privacy, public safety and national security. Samway spent ten years (2000-2010) at Yahoo!, where he was a vice presiden... Read More →

Speakers
PH

Patrik Hiselius

Senior Advisor, Digital Rights, Telia Company
avatar for Julie Owono

Julie Owono

Executive Director, Internet Sans frontières
I work at the intersection of Tech, Human Rights, Business. | I am a lawyer, and the Executive Director of Internet Without Borders, an organisation defending digital rights, and an open Internet for all.
avatar for Cynthia Wong

Cynthia Wong

Senior Internet Researcher, Human Rights Watch


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
205C

14:30

Eye of the Beholder: Government Attempts to Define and Detect "Extremism"
By presenting trends and risks from around the world arising from government efforts to define and detect “extremism,” this panel will invite audience members to think open-mindedly about what their own societies may currently or someday characterize as “extremist,” as well as the concomitant risks to civil and political rights. In doing so, we will step back from the question of what companies should be doing to detect and counter certain behaviors or speech, and create an opportunity to refocus on the motivations, definitions, and tactics of governments, with a sensitivity to broader historical and social contexts. Our session also aims to identify new trends in government uses of surveillance and AI/algorithms to detect so-called “extremists” by examining specific examples already being implemented.

Panelists will engage in a moderated discussion of concepts of “extremism” and resulting surveillance or similar measures from around the world. The audience will then be invited to share experiences and viewpoints as part of an interactive discussion. To conclude, the panelists and audience will discuss ideas about how to investigate and challenge government measures in this area.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Nighat Dad

Nighat Dad

Founder and Director, Digital Rights Foundation
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression and clinical professor of law at the University of California, Irvine, School of Law. 
avatar for Faiza Patel

Faiza Patel

Co-Director, Liberty & National Security Program, Brennan Center for Justice
Faiza Patel is an expert on national security and surveillance laws and policies, who focuses on how they impact minority populations. In addition to co-authoring the Center’s Extreme Vetting report, she has published research on countering violent extremism, efforts to incite... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
203A

14:30

The Perfect Storm? Misinformation and Extremist Propaganda
When does ‘fake news’ stop being and buzzword and become sinister propaganda? Fears are mounting over the increasingly symbiotic relationship between purveyors of misinformation and violent extremist organisations. Extremist groups have always used misleading or false narratives to recruit vulnerable individuals to their cause, increasingly through online propaganda and messaging. The growing flood of misinformation in the global media ecosystem provides ample fodder for these groups to increase the scale of their recruitment efforts. Extremist groups and malicious actors spreading misinformation are mutual beneficiaries of the chaos that ensues when it is increasingly hard to tell truths from lies, facts from fiction on the internet.

This fireside chat will bring together leaders from technology, media and civil society to discuss how we respond to the challenges presented by this new internet media ecosystem. The session will pose the following questions to experts and audience members:

1. How is the relationship between online misinformation and violent extremism evolving? What impact is this having on the online environment and the health of broader public discourse?
2. What lessons have been learned from attempts to tackle extremist content on the internet in responding to disinformation? In both cases, context is critical. In both cases, human rights to speech and protection from harm are at stake. Where can experts on violent extremism provide best practice to those working to counter disinformation?
3. Who should be at the forefront of efforts to tackle disinformation? Where does this differ from efforts to tackle extremist recruitment? When are governments or technology companies inappropriate or uncredible actors? How and when should those dealing with violent extremism and disinformation collaborate? When should they be firewalled?
4. What practical systems or processes can we build to ensure collaboration when tackling malicious content that knowingly fuels hate and extremism?

Moderators
avatar for Rob Pegoraro

Rob Pegoraro

Contributing Editor, Yahoo Finance
Rob Pegoraro tries to make sense of computers, gadgets, the Internet, apps, and other things that beep or blink. He covers tech policy at Yahoo Finance, writes a tech-help column for USAToday.com, offers telecom and gadget guidance at Wirecutter and has contributed to such sites as Consumer Reports, Ars Technica... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Chloe Colliver

Chloe Colliver

Project Coordinator, ISD
avatar for Joan Donovan

Joan Donovan

Media Manipulation/Platform Accountability Research Lead, Data & Society
avatar for Dean Jackson

Dean Jackson

Assistant Program Officer, National Endowment for Democracy
I work on the Research & Conferences team at the National Endowment for Democracy, a grantmaking institution that provides support to democratic activists and independent media around the world. On the R&C team, I handle disinformation-related projects. Talk to me about disinfo... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
204C

14:30

The threat to India’s Internet Freedom: Stories of resistance and resilience from India’s Journalists, Activists, and Academics
India is one of the largest democracies in the world and it’s internet freedom is deeply at risk as the rise of hindu fundamentalism has led to the creation of  one of the largest surveillance and disinformation apparatuses in the world.  With 22 major languages, 1.3 billion people, there are disparities in technical literacy and a massive landscape of non-standardized mobile tech, platforms, and language solutions. During the 2015 elections the BJP party took advantage of this vulnerable system and built one of the most effective and violent apparatus for harassment, disinformation and violence. This has led to the systematic disenfranchisement of marginalized communities from the internet.

From harassment, to disinformation, to even offline violence as a result of online surveillance the right to privacy and free speech are directly under attack. Further Indian surveillance is shrouded by secrecy with few discussions about India’s Central Monitoring System (CMS) which allows governmental agencies to monitor electronic communications in real time without informing the subject or a judge. And now Indians are facing the ramifications of the compromise of the Aadhaar Id the largest biometric database in the world.

This session will describe the nature of government and corporate surveillance in India and what the impact has been on marginalized communities. This session is key for people wanting to develop for one of the largest android markets in the world as well as for human rights and policy advocates interested in what is happening in the battle for internet freedom in South Asia. With 1 in 6 people in the world being Indian, the challenges we face are not just our problem but are global in scope. Join us to be part of the solution.

Speakers
avatar for Thenmozhi Soundararajan

Thenmozhi Soundararajan

Thenmozhi is an artist, activist, and technologist with Equality Labs., Equality Labs
Equality Labs


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
201C

14:30

NGO Partnerships for Justice: Using technology to advance victim-centered investigations and litigation of serious crimes
Over recent years, investigators and prosecutors have been utilizing emerging technologies for investigating violations of international criminal and humanitarian law on behalf of government or international bodies. However, such investigations are often preceded by the work of NGOs and civil society groups representing victims of such crimes in both legal and advocacy efforts. Legal NGOs are increasingly filing and litigating cases directly on behalf victim communities, using laws designed to protect victims of serious crimes domestically or extraterritorially through universal jurisdiction. Such NGOs, which are often under resourced and understaffed, have the most to gain from emerging technologies aimed at documenting and preserving evidence of serious crimes, but a technology gap still persists.

This panel aims to highlight two partnerships between NGOs developing and litigating cases on behalf of victims of serious crimes (TRIAL and CJA), and organizations developing technologies to enhance their efforts (eyeWitness and U.C. Berkeley’s Open Source Investigation Lab). It also aims to engage with the audience on ways in which emerging technologies can be better communicated to legal NGOs developing cases directly on behalf of victims of serious crimes and mass atrocities.

We will bring together teams of human rights investigators and organizations developing human rights fact finding technologies to discuss how they have implemented new tools in the field, and how these tools have enhanced their work in building evidence on behalf of victims of serious crimes.

The panel will unpack the challenges and opportunities faced in implementing these tools in practice, the legal viability in proceedings before domestic courts, and the continued investigation needs of human rights investigators that are developing evidence for litigation. By the end of the discussion, the teams hope to highlight continued investigations needs from NGOs and discuss ideas for a tech advisory committee to NGOs litigating directly on behalf of victims.

Moderators
avatar for Carmen Cheung

Carmen Cheung

Legal Director, Center for Justice and Accountability
Carmen Cheung is the Legal Director of the Center for Justice & Accountability (CJA), a San Francisco-based human rights organization which works to create accountability for serious human rights abuses through litigation and advocacy. Prior to joining CJA, Carmen was a Professor... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Wendy Betts

Wendy Betts

Project Director, eyeWitness to Atrocities
Wendy Betts is the Project Director for eyeWitness to Atrocities. Ms. Betts has twenty years of experience in international development, rule of law reform, and transitional justice. She has managed projects throughout Eastern Europe as well as in Sierra Leone, Indonesia, and Hai... Read More →
avatar for Félim McMahon

Félim McMahon

Director of Human Rights & Technology Program; Director, Human Rights Investigations Lab, Human Rights Center at UC Berkeley School of Law
Open source information pioneer, practitioner and educator with a focus on human rights and legal accountability. Leading an immersive education program at UC Berkeley teaching 80 undergraduate and graduate students how to research and analyse online information in support of hum... Read More →
avatar for Daniele Perissi

Daniele Perissi

Head of DRC human rights program, TRIAL International
I'm a Legal Advisor and Head of the DRC program. I joined TRIAL International in September 2011, working on projects in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Nepal and, since 2014, the DRC. I coordinates TRIAL’s projects there, representing Congolese victims of grave crimes before national and i... Read More →
avatar for Nushin Sarkarati

Nushin Sarkarati

Senior Staff Attorney, Center for Justice and Accountability
An attorney with the Center for Justice and Accountability, working with victims of torture and serious human rights abuse to investigate and bring cases against perpetrators seeking safe haven in the US. I also represent victims of the Khmer Rouge regime in their quest for just... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
205B

14:30

Squeezed Between Russia and China. Digital Rights in Central Asia
Digital rights activists, human rights defenders, cultural activists in Central Asia, and our allies internationally, need to bluntly confront the degree to which digital "civic space" is under threat in the region, analyze remedies and prioritize efforts. Central Asia governments interested in curbing online rights - essentially all of them - can both reference policies in Russia and China as justification and adopt the actual tools and practices of repression which have been developed. The rights community needs to understand: 1) how has the digital rights environment deteriorated and how is it likely to deteriorate further; 2) what are the most critical immediate/looming threats; and 3) what can we do ourselves and what help do we most critically need from international actors (civil society, the private sector, government, international agencies).

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Asomiddin Atoev

Asomiddin Atoev

Project Coordinator, Public Fund Canadian International Innovation Program


Wednesday May 16, 2018 14:30 - 15:45
201A

15:00

Laws against freedom of expression (case study: Singapore)
How Singapore has economic success by not having human rights

Speakers
avatar for Leong Sze Hian

Leong Sze Hian

President, Maruah
He has served as president of 4 professional bodies, honorary consul of 2 countries and founding advisor to the financial planning associations of 2 countries - an alumnus of Harvard University, has authored 4 books, quoted over 1500 times in the media , has been a radio talkshow... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 15:00 - 15:25
Village Main Stage

16:00

How can platforms preserve pluralism and freedom of information?
Freedom of expression is increasingly being used as a weapon against freedom of information through authoritarian regimes' use of online platforms to attempt to silence critical reporting/information sharing. RSF and participating panelists from the field of journalism and human rights will discuss a number of potential solutions to this problem that would preserve media pluralism and freedom of information.

Moderators
Speakers
DH

Delphine Halgand-Mishra

Executive Director, The Signals Network
Delphine Halgand-Mishra is the Executive Director of The Signals Foundation. She previously served for six years as Reporters Without Borders’ North America Director, advocating for journalists, bloggers, and media rights worldwide. | Interested to talk about whistleblowers, a... Read More →
avatar for Trinh Nguyen

Trinh Nguyen

Internet Freedom Program Manager, Viet Tan
An for organizer for Viet Tan, a grassroots pro-democracy organization with members in Vietnam and around the world. Also serves as the Director of Technology & Safety at Rhize, a network that supports movements and movement leaders around the world. In this role, she helps movem... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
205B

16:00

Innovation on the frontlines: how grassroots activists are utilizing technology to enhance their work

There has been a proliferation of technological tools for human rights defenders, offering new ways for activists to carry out their work and achieve their missions. However, uptake of these tools by local activists on the frontlines of the human rights movement has been difficult. Much of the technology available - often developed by international organisations - is inaccessible to community based organisations or groups working with marginalized or rural communities. Despite this, grassroots human rights defenders are beginning to experiment and develop their own innovative low-tech solutions to enhance their day to day work, experiments that are developed in context with local capacity, access and challenges in mind. The problem, however, is that frontline groups often lack the technical expertise and resources to develop robust technological solutions, and are also often isolated from the conversations around technology and human rights happening at the international level, making it difficult for them to build upon, and improve their low-tech work.

‘Innovation on the frontlines’, will feature a diverse group of grassroots human rights defenders – all of whom are utilizing different and unique context-specific low-tech solutions to support their work. The panel will be moderated by David Mattingly, Vice President of International Programs at the Fund for Global Human Rights, and will provide frontline defenders a platform to interact directly with the international human rights and technology communities - to share their experiences about what technology is working for them, what is not, and why.

Moderators
avatar for David Mattingly

David Mattingly

Vice President for Programs, Fund fro Global Human Rights
As Vice President for Programs for the Fund for Global Human Rights, David is responsible for oversight, coordination, and integration of human rights grant-making in six regions around the world. Since joining the Fund in 2005, David has managed grants programs for frontline gro... Read More →

Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
202B

16:00

Lightning Talks: Civic Tech vs. Civic Accountability: Where ICT and Governments Intersect
Secrecy Costs, Openness Pays: How open contracting not only boosts transparency and accountability, but also saves money for governments (President, Right to Know Coalition)

Speakers: Michael Karanicolas

Every government in the world, from the richest to the poorest, works within a limited budget, and every public body faces pressure to bring down costs, or to maximize the quality of what they deliver with the budget they are allocated. In the context of public procurement, the vast sums of money at stake mean that even tiny efficiencies can be enormously valuable. According to the World Bank, public procurement accounts for around a fifth of global GDP, and up to 50% of total government expenditure in developing countries. According to the OECD, around 10-20% of that money is lost every year to corruption.

Civil society groups have long advocated for transparency as a facilitator of democratic participation, enhancing relations between citizens and the State, and promoting public accountability. However, new research shows that transparency in public contracting processes also provides substantial financial benefits to implementing governments, primarily by boosting the competitiveness and efficiency of contracting processes, by fighting corruption, and by facilitating public oversight.

This session will present new research on the impacts of open contracting from a set of case studies carried out by Michael Karanicolas for the Open Government Partnership. These include evidence that Ukraine's ProZorro open contracting system has saved the government nearly USD 1.5 billion since it was established in 2015, on a total budget of just USD 5.5 million. Paraguay's open contracting systems have saved the country USD 72 million on office supplies alone since 2010, while Virginia's eVA system has reduced costs by around USD 450 million.

Resistance or cooperation? A look at civic tech movements and their relationships with governments (Civic Tech Toronto and Open Culture Foundation)

Speakers: Anowa Quarcoo & Aaron Wytze Wilson

While they often aim to solve problems and step into gaps that the government isn’t filling, civic tech movements don’t have universal relationships or interactions with the establishment. This lightning talk will compare civic tech movements in Toronto (Canada) and Taipei (Taiwan), and draw on examples from other jurisdictions, to explore civic tech's relationship with government.

Soon We Are All Miners. A Look Into How Blockchain Mining May Impact the Future of Work. (General Catalyst)

Speakers: Rene Reinsberg

This lightning talk will start with a high-level overview of various blockchain consensus algorithms and examine how different designs may lead to different outcomes in participation and governance. Given the rise of blockchain-based applications, the talk will try to provide answers to the question of what needs to happen so that more people are able to participate in this emerging ecosystem, in the broader context of how technology in general, and blockchain more particularly, is shaping the future of work.

"We don't need human rights because we have phenomenal economic success" (Maruah)

Speakers: Leong Sze Hian

Singapore is widely regarded as the economic miracle in modern times - but it has very low rankings for human rights, press freedom, electoral freedom, etc, - Why? - The secrets to its success and the link to human rights?

Speakers
avatar for Leong Sze Hian

Leong Sze Hian

President, Maruah
He has served as president of 4 professional bodies, honorary consul of 2 countries and founding advisor to the financial planning associations of 2 countries - an alumnus of Harvard University, has authored 4 books, quoted over 1500 times in the media , has been a radio talkshow... Read More →
avatar for Michael Karanicolas

Michael Karanicolas

President, Right to Know Coalition
avatar for Anowa Quarcoo

Anowa Quarcoo

Co-founder, Civic Tech Toronto
An award-winning strategic communications professional, Anowa has worked at all three levels of Canadian government. She is a 2015-2016 CivicAction Diversity Fellow and is also Co-founder of Civic Tech Toronto, one of North America’s largest civic tech communities. | | Anowa... Read More →



Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
205A

16:00

What does it mean to be a citizen in a digital era?
As people become more connected with ideas, movements, and other people around the world, our notion of citizenship—and thus, our notion of identity in relation to where we live—is changing rapidly.

This panel will explore what citizenship means in a digital era—including the rights, responsibilities, challenges, and opportunities for each one of us—as well as the transformation in public governance necessary to adapt to this changing role of the citizen.

This session will be presented as a fireside-chat-style conversation between panelists; audience participation will be encouraged.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Dubois

Elizabeth Dubois

Assistant Professor, University of Ottawa
avatar for Bianca Wylie

Bianca Wylie

Co-founder, Tech Reset Canada
Co-Founder, Tech Reset Canada & Senior Fellow, CIGI


Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
204C

16:00

Refugee.Info: Empowerment for Refugees through Connectivity and Information
From its inception Refugee.Info, joint project by MercyCorps and IRC, highly focused on work with partners. In this session, we will demonstrate our unique approach for delivering sustainable beneficiary facing WiFi networks in various settlements, from remote refugee camps to urban settings.

By combining Refugee.Info WiFi networks and information dissemination platforms, we've successfully reached over 700.000 beneficiaries up to date, delivering important information to people in need.

Today under global umbrella SignPost, project expanded to 7 countries, and keeps growing.
Our goal is to share lessons learned, demonstrate why usage of advanced networking technology is a must when delivering open WiFi networks to vulnerable populations, how to tune and tweak networks over course of time, and last but not least, how our approach ignited spark that lead to Cisco and Mercy Corps "Technology for Impact" five-year partnership agreement.

Moderators
avatar for Jovan Jelicic

Jovan Jelicic

T4D - Global Connectivity Manager, MercyCorps
As Global Connectivity Manager, Mercy Corps Technology for Development department (T4D), my responsibility is to deliver sustainable, secure Wi-Fi networks to high-density environments in different regions of the world. Since 2016 I've been heavily engaged in Syrian response cris... Read More →

Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
200A

16:00

Using crowd-sourced fact-checking chatbot to fight misinformation across closed messenger chatrooms
In this session we will present Cofact, a collaborative fact-checking system combining a LINE chatbot with a hoax database, supported by g0v.tw civic tech grant. Out team grew up within 8 months, soon becoming a 200 volunteering editors fact checking community, and more than 20k people using the chat bot to reporting 250 news every week.

( More info here: bit.ly/cofacts-quickstart )

We plan to cover the following aspects:

- Consumptions of misinformation in Taiwan
- How the system is designed to bring different voice to the users
- Building a collaborative fact-checking community in your country

Moderators
avatar for Wu, Min Hsuan (ttcat)

Wu, Min Hsuan (ttcat)

Deputy CEO, Open Culture Foundation
Ttcat is an activist/campaigner of a number of social movements in Taiwan start from 2004, including the anti-nuclear, environmental, LGBT, Human Rights movement and green politic. He has expertise in creative planning, as well as communication and design programming. He has prov... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Johnson Liang

Johnson Liang

Participant, g0v.tw
I am... | | - A web developer that works at an Internet company as a day job. | | - An open-sourced civic tech supporter, participated & founded several projects that facilitates civic participation of democracy. | | - Going to present Cofacts, the voluntary project I have fou... Read More →



Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
200B

16:00

Human Rights versus the Botnets
This panel will explore the ways in which botnets -- and botnet response -- can affect civil liberties and human rights online, and what actions can be taken to mitigate harm.

Botnets can be used to knock websites run by activists and dissidents, independent journalists, human rights groups, and civil society groups offline. Providing those vulnerable actors with tools and services to protect their websites from these attacks can help them continue their invaluable work. At the same time, indiscriminate botnet response with techniques like blocking, seizing and sinkholing has the potential to do collateral damage to the exercise of others’ rights.

This panel will bring together representatives from industry and civil society to talk about both how to protect vulnerable websites and how to respect human rights when responding to botnet attack. The goal is to: (1) discuss the most effective defense mechanisms for websites to defend against the threat of botnets, (2) facilitate a conversation about how botnet defense mechanisms -- whether used by vulnerable website or others -- might impact others; (3) address ways to identify websites at risk of attack and educate them about available tools; and (4) discuss principles that could help guide botnet response.

Moderators
avatar for Michelle Richardson

Michelle Richardson

Deputy Director, Freedom, Security and Technology Project, Center for Democracy and Technology
I am an expert in surveillance and cybersecurity law and policy. Talk to me about how we build government and corporate programs that are effective while respecting civil rights and liberties-- intelligence gathering, law enforcement investigations, cyber info sharing, cybersecu... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for George Conard

George Conard

Product Manager, Jigsaw (Google)
I'm the product manager for Project Shield, a free service from Jigsaw that uses Google infrastructure to protect rights organizations, news publishers, journalists, and elections-related websites from digital attacks. | | Jigsaw is an incubator within Alphabet that builds techn... Read More →
LH

Leo Henrichsen

Virtualroad.org
avatar for Alissa Starzak

Alissa Starzak

Head of Public Policy, Cloudflare
avatar for Dmitri Vitaliev

Dmitri Vitaliev

Director, eQualitie
Dmitri is the founder and director of eQualit.ie with fifteen years experience working on digital security and privacy technology with civil society organizations. He has led and participated in missions to over 40 countries, is the author of the "Digital Security and Privacy for... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
203A

16:00

#feministinternet: Where is our movement now and where are we going?
Feminists movements around the world recognize the internet as an important site for the struggle for sexual and reproductive health rights, gender equality, empowerment, and liberation. This workshop will revisit the Feminist Principles of the Internet (FPI) that are divided into 5 broad clusters: Access, Movement, Economy, Expression, and Embodiment/Agency. After 3 global convenings aimed at imagining and building a feminist internet, the workshop aims to answer the following questions: where are we and where are we going in terms of the FPI?

This workshop is envisioned to last from 1.5 to 2 hours and will be divided into two: a) ground-clearing; and b) action planning. The "clearing the ground" part will be devoted to re-examining the FPI through the lens of feminist acts of resistance offline and online. After clearing the ground, the participants will break into small groups based on the FPI clusters and are expected to develop action plans that they can adopt or implement in their contexts.

Moderators
avatar for Naomi Fontanos

Naomi Fontanos

Executive Director, Gender and Development Advocates (GANDA) Filipinas
Writer/educator. Internet freedom advocate. Trans, gender and sexuality, human rights, peace and development activist. Feminist.

Speakers
avatar for Sara Baker

Sara Baker

Take Back the Tech! Campaign Team Coordinator, Association for Progressive Communications
HB

Hyra Basit

Digital Rights Foundation
avatar for Dhyta Caturani

Dhyta Caturani

Digital Integrity Fellow, Open Technology Fund
avatar for Jac sm Kee

Jac sm Kee

Women's Rights Programme Manager, Association for Progressive Communication
avatar for Japleen Pasricha

Japleen Pasricha

Founder, Feminism in India
avatar for Erika Smith

Erika Smith

Mexico capacity building and networking coordinator, Association for Progressive Communications


Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
206D

16:00

Ally Skills Workshop

The Ally Skills Workshop teaches simple everyday ways for people to use their privilege and influence to support people who are targets of systemic oppression in their workplaces and communities. This includes women of all races, people of color, people with disabilities, LGBTQ folks, parents, caregivers of all sorts, and people of different ages.

The workshop will be structured as a brief talk followed by a series of scenarios that are discussed in small groups.


Speakers
avatar for Leigh Honeywell

Leigh Honeywell

CEO, Tall Poppy
Leigh is the founder and CEO of Tall Poppy. She was previously a Technology Fellow at the ACLU’s Project on Speech, Privacy, and Technology, and also worked at SlackSalesforce.comMicrosoft, and Symantec. She co-founded hackerspaces in Toronto and Seattle, and is an advisor to several nonprofits and startups. Leigh has a Bachelors of Science from the University of Toronto where she majored... Read More →



Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
206B

16:00

Breaking through echo chambers: Is the way we talk about inclusion stopping us from achieving it?
Bring your thinking hats:  Let’s bust down some echo chambers!

Troll-farmer Ruurd will train you in the fine art of trolling. Why? In online spaces discourse around inclusion is being manipulated. By teaching you how to do it, (or vaccinating you, as he would say) you'll gain insight into how it's done and also learn how to spot trolls.Next, Bec and Pavi will guide you through different approaches to inclusion (and exclusion) which they've learned from running large online communities, and brainstorm experiences from participants.As a grand finale, they'll draw on insights gathered throughout the session to pull together a list of ideas to bust down echo chambersand explore different ways of achieving inclusion. This session is for people in academia, institutions, NGOs, technologists, and human rights activists.

Moderators
avatar for Gabriela Terrazas

Gabriela Terrazas

Business Development & Partnerships, RNW Media
Gabriela is an experienced business developer, fundraiser and partnership developer for both the corporate and non-profit sectors. She is an expert in building partnerships, creating and promoting innovative solutions, and raising funds to support a diverse range of projects.Pres... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Bec Connelly

Bec Connelly

Content Strategist, RNW Media
Bec Connelly understands how to get information in front of people in digital spaces. At RNW she works alongside teams to understand how technical platforms can be built to be inclusive of different opinions and perspectives. She also explores how to adapt language to different c... Read More →
avatar for Ruurd Oosterwoud

Ruurd Oosterwoud

Founder, DROG
We make vaccines to battle disinformation. Play our game at www.getbadnews.com. Our approach is based on over four years of personal experience in the field of disinformation research and policy. Aks me about our troll farms and I'll tell you all!
avatar for Pavithra Ram

Pavithra Ram

Content Strategist, RNW Media
Pavi shapes the content strategy, which builds the Citizens’ Voice programme’s inclusive digital communities, where young people can come together in a safe environment to freely voice their opinions, discuss sensitive subjects and engage in constructive dialogue. She has ove... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
204B

16:00

Do we need free speech legislation like we need privacy laws?
Around the world, there is some degree of national legislation that circumscribes privacy rights in an environment where risks are obvious. In freedom of expression, the activities of intermediaries can also restrict our rights as citizens or consumers. National legislation that positively protects our free speech against arbitrary restrictions by online companies is broadly absent.

Intermediary liability discussions are not new. We have been having similar agreements and disagreements without moving the discussion forward for decades. This session aims at discussing whether free speech legislation as a backstop to unending state demands for private regulation of our online activities would be a necessary and proportionate tool. If positive legislation is not the solution, what durable framework and other measures can protect freedom of expression online in the XXI century?

Moderators
avatar for Maryant Fernandez

Maryant Fernandez

Senior Policy Advisor, European Digital Rights (EDRi)
Maryant is a Senior Policy Advisor at European Digital Rights (EDRi) and a lawyer admitted to the Madrid Bar association. Maryant defends human rights and fundamental freedoms online in the European Union. She works on surveillance and law enforcement, intermediary liability (e-c... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Nate Cardozo

Nate Cardozo

Senior Staff Attorney, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Nate Cardozo is a Senior Staff Attorney on EFF’s civil liberties team where he focuses on cybersecurity policy and defending coders’ rights. | | Nate has litigated cases involving electronic surveillance, freedom of information, digital anonymity, online free expression, and... Read More →
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression and clinical professor of law at the University of California, Irvine, School of Law. 
avatar for Lisa Vermeer

Lisa Vermeer

Senior Policy Officer, Dutch MFA
Senior Policy Advisor on Human Rights and Internet | Dutch Focal Point for the Freedom Online Coalition | Managing Dutch Internet Freedom project portfolio Human Rights Fund | | Former advisor to Dutch MPs on EU Justice and Home affairs, former research fellow at the Scientific... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
203B

16:00

State Hacking and Crypto Wars 2.0
Governments worldwide are trying to initiate far-reaching
interventions in IT-systems, state hacking and also backdoors and central keys. In Germany for example, the comprehensive use of a "Staatstrojaner" was allowed in 2017 and state hacking is becoming more
and more exaggerated. We are currently experiencing how the Crypto Wars
2.0 are taking place, against encrypted messengers, but also against
entire systems themselves.
This Fishbowl wants to bring together the different strings in this debate on active hacking and a new Crypto War. We want to give an global overview and show how civil society is handling this issue. GFF is currently preparing a constitutional complaint against the new German law. Strategic
litigation can be a means to set clear boundaries, against state
sponsored hacking and for public IT security. This Fishbowl wants to invite participants to discuss the issue and share experiences and exchange best practice ideas about how to fight them.
The Fishbowl will start with three short intros of 5 minutes and then open up the circle for participation. A Fishbowl allows to invite different stakeholder positions and makes the discussions more interactive.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Amie Stepanovich

Amie Stepanovich

U.S. Policy Manager, Access Now


Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
206C

16:00

Technologies in Support of Next Generation Climate and Weather Services: Facilitating Integration, Standardization and Incentive Systems

The use of technology in the weather and climate sphere prompts challenges to the protection of human rights in ways that are not obvious. If law, policy and governance and its role in standardization should have an emancipatory potential, then it would stem from its ability to account for and safeguard rights and equitable concerns, in the face of challenges that result from the integration of emerging technologies. In the context of satellite technologies, and Distributed Ledger Technologies, panelists discuss how we think about the relationship between innovations and techniques to address changing weather and climate in the context of social conditions and the need for a better understanding of the world around us. But what exactly needs to be safeguarded while solutions are rolled out? Could it be that safeguarding rights would be individuals having the courage to secure the role of setting the standards/rules/smart contracts in order to preempt the powerful from having total control of future innovations and outcomes? What is the role of transparency as a safeguard, and technology frameworks that not only support incentive systems but give individuals the perception that they are in control of the processes happening around them, and decisions being made in the use of technology also reflect the values, beliefs and expectations of marginalized populations? A pure focus on individuals however may be incomplete, as addressing the systemic issues of weak central institutions that do not adequately consider the challenges faced by society is also an important priority.

 


Moderators
TA

Timiebi Aganaba-Jeanty, PhD

Post-doctoral Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation
Space and satellites | Environmental Law and Climate Change | Emerging digital technologies and their integration: law and policy implications

Speakers
avatar for Stella Melo

Stella Melo

Manager, Government of Canada
STELLA MELO | Stella has a PhD is Space Science and since then has worked pushing the edge of knowledge and fostering innovation on fields of earth and planetary atmospheres, climate and weather. She worked for over 10 years at the Canadian Space Agency as Program Scientist provi... Read More →
avatar for James Slifierz

James Slifierz

CEO, SkyWatch
James is the Co-Founder and CEO at SkyWatch Space Applications. He is also a Co-Founder and Chair of MaxQ, Canada's first organization focused on developing the space startup ecosystem, and the Lead Organizer for NASA Space Apps Waterloo. In 2014 James was a part of the team that... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
201A

16:00

"Competition Is For Losers": How Can We Scale Collaborations that Challenge the Kleptocrats?
When Peter Thiel coined the phrase 'Competition is for losers', he meant: don't start a business, start a monopoly. In a 2014 Wall Street Journal piece, he expanded on this, saying 'creating value isn't enough - you also need to capture some of the value you create'.

How do we define the value of journalism? Is it what turns a profit - clickbait, political gossip, or propaganda - or grows an audience, or something else?

The crisis in journalism is about business models to a point, but it goes far deeper. Real value in journalism is created when it challenges power (whether governments, individuals and corporations - especially monopolies) and inspires change. This is how journalism can support citizens and defend democracy.

But it often seems that the journalism that focuses on these outcomes captures almost none of the enormous social and financial value it creates. How can we solve that?

Learning from the powerful is an important part of the answer. The informal networks that generate the wealth, power and influence that govern our world are intensely collaborative, pragmatic - and global. Recent investigative projects and partnerships show there is appetite to mirror this, in order to produce results which hold the powerful to account and spark change. But there is so much more to do.

In this session we will explore what some of the most successful collaborations have been, and how they can be replicated. But we also hope to define barriers that curtail growth in accountability journalism, and find ways to overcome or circumvent them.

Moderators
avatar for Tom King

Tom King

Director, Aviso
I work with non-profit media and civil society organisations to help them grow, while aiming to identify and address the systemic challenges that get in the way of strengthening and expanding democracies and open societies. | | Currently, I am working on strategic development wi... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Felipe Estefan

Felipe Estefan

Director of Investments, Omidyar Network
avatar for Mary Fitzgerald

Mary Fitzgerald

Editor-in-chief, openDemocracy
Mary runs openDemocracy, a global, non-profit media outlet that seeks to challenge power and inspire change through tenacious reporting, thoughtful analysis and democratic debate. | | Mary is a trustee of the human rights charity Reprieve, and sits on the code committee of Impr... Read More →
avatar for Veda Hlubinka-Cook

Veda Hlubinka-Cook

Executive Director, Factful
Veda Hlubinka-Cook is the Executive Director of Factful, a nonprofit developing technology to fight transnational corruption. She is a co-founder of Metaweb, the developer of Freebase, a massive entity-relationship database, acquired by Google in 2010 as the basis for their Knowl... Read More →
avatar for Mira Milosevic

Mira Milosevic

Executive Director, Global Forum for Media Development
Mira Milosevic is Executive Director of the Global Forum for Media Development, a network of more than 190 media development and journalism assistance organisations. Mira was a Director of Media Development Programmes at WAN-IFRA (World Association of Newspapers and News Publishe... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
206A

16:00

Zeroing in on journalism and press freedom in zero-rating initiatives
The session is designed to build understanding of how zero-rating, free basics and other specific net neutrality-related approaches are impacting journalism and media organizations around the world. Although there has been a lot of attention on issues related to zero-rating and net neutrality, little, if any has focused on the specific impact on and influence of media and journalists. We want to know how these policies are impacting media and journalists (including independent journalists, like bloggers and freelancers), whether they are even aware of their country's and/or media organization's policy and subscription in such initiatives, how this has impacted their journalism or media organization. We have seen that many journalists were unaware when their media outlets signed onto free basics or a similar service, and in some cases journalists petitioned management to remove them. We would like to understand how media organizations and journalists are responding to zero-rating initiatives and what the press freedom and journalistic dynamics of these initiatives are. This will directly inform our advocacy with specific companies and on media policy to ensure positions and approaches are informed by these journalistic perspectives.

Moderators
avatar for Dr. Courtney Radsch

Dr. Courtney Radsch

Advocacy Director, Committee to Protect Journalists
Dr. Courtney Radsch is the Advocacy Director of the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ). As a journalist, researcher, and freedom of expression advocate, she writes and speaks frequently on the nexus of technology, journalism, and rights. She is the author of Cyberactivism a... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Amba Kak

Amba Kak

Tech policy fellow, Mozilla
avatar for Daniel O'Maley

Daniel O'Maley

Associate Editor, Center for Intl Media Assistance
I'm the Associate Editor at the Center for International Media Assistance. My portfolio includes Internet policy and tech innovation. Anyone interested in publishing reports on these topics in terms of how they relate to media should get in touch with me.


Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
201B

16:00

Access My Info: Exposing disconnects between data protection in theory and in practice
How are telecommunications companies around the world collecting, storing, and sharing customer information? What can customers learn about telecom data handling practices through personal data access requests?

Access My Info (AMI) is a project that seeks answers to these questions through the combination of novel research methods, a web tool, and advocacy strategies.

From its beginnings in Canada, the project expanded to a comparative study of data protection laws and data request responses in jurisdictions across Asia including Australia, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Korea, and Malaysia conducted by a network of researchers and legal advocates. Each network partner sent personal data requests to telecommunication companies and Internet Service Providers (ISPs) in their respective jurisdictions to better understand the type of data these companies collect on their customers, how long this data is retained for, and if it is shared with third-parties. Asia is a particularly interesting region to conduct this study because it includes countries with strong personal data access laws, those with none, and those which are in the process of establishing data protection legislation.

Data protection is a dynamic legal space and there are important contextual and legal differences between the jurisdictions we studied. Despite these differences, overall we found the responses from telcos to be incomplete and inconsistent, and in some cases not in compliance with legal requirements. Generally, across jurisdictions telecoms and ISPs have yet to develop a mature process to fulsomely handle citizens’ and residents’ requests for personal data. These results show a disconnect between law in theory and how the law works in practice to protect personal data.

Through a panel with the project partners, this session will present findings from our comparative study and engage the audience in a discussion of what is or should be personal data, its protection and the future of an economy based on data driven innovation.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Bram Abramson

Bram Abramson

Open Web Fellow, Mozilla Foundation
Toronto-based communications lawyer with a background in telecom networks, broadcast policy, and data regulation.
avatar for Christopher Parsons

Christopher Parsons

Research Associate, Citizen Lab
Dr. Christopher Parsons received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the University of Guelph, and his Ph.D from the University of Victoria. He is the Managing Director of the Telecom Transparency Project and a Research Associate at the Citizen Lab, in the Munk School... Read More →
avatar for Sonny Zulhuda

Sonny Zulhuda

Associate Professor, International Islamic University Malaysia
Cyberlaw, Data Protection Law, Information governance, Indonesia, Malaysia, Information security


Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
200C

16:00

Documenting ICT companies' impact on civic freedoms & human rights defenders
When internet, mobile, and telecommunications companies fail to put in place human rights-respecting commitments and policies, their practices may directly or indirectly result in the violation of users’ freedom of expression and privacy rights. These violations in turn intensify the global attack by governments and populist demagogues, and non-state actors, including companies, against human rights defenders and journalists. Highlighting this human impact of company policies and practices is crucial in making the case for why companies must institute—and policymakers should support—policies that foster and reinforce respect for internet users’ rights. Although stories of such violations sometimes make the news, until recently there were no systematic efforts to gather evidence in a way that helps all stakeholders better understand the scale and impact of the abuses and attacks.

This session will examine a) how the digital rights community can work together to improve the way that we document the impact of ICT company policies and practices on freedom of expression and privacy, and b) how improved documentation of cases of negative impact may help stakeholders work with companies and governments to improve grievance and remedy mechanisms for internet users, and specifically human rights defenders, whose rights have been violated.

We will open the workshop with perspectives from the Business and Human Rights Resource Centre on the importance and impact of documentation of the roles corporations have played in abuses and attacks on defenders across different sectors. We will then learn about several projects that use different approaches to collect different types of documentation: Global Voices’ newly relaunched Threatened Voices database, built to capture information about incidents of threat AND people who face these threats. Onlinecensorship.org has been running a tool for several years that enables people to report violations connected with companies' terms-of-service enforcement, and has new related project documenting such incidents in the ICT sector that have received media attention. Access Now recently rolled out a network shutdown impact reporting tool that they recently rolled out as part of their “shutdown stories”. We then will brainstorm, with all session participants: a) concrete ways that everyone can collaborate with and use the data generated by these projects, and b) how we can use the evidence gathered by these projects to work with companies to improve grievance and remedy mechanisms, as well as the broader operating environment for civil society.

Moderators
avatar for Rebecca Mackinnon

Rebecca Mackinnon

Director, Ranking Digital Rights
Rebecca MacKinnon is director of the Ranking Digital Rights project which works to set global standards for how companies in the information and communications technology (ICT) sector and beyond should respect freedom of expression and privacy. In 2018 project's flagship Corporat... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ellery Biddle

Ellery Biddle

Advocacy Director, Global Voices
I'm the advocacy director at Global Voices. My job is to support our community in reporting on threats to online speech, sharing tactics for defending the work and words of netizens, and promoting efforts to improve Internet policy and practice worldwide in the interest of human... Read More →
avatar for Peter Micek

Peter Micek

Global Policy & Legal Counsel, Access Now
avatar for Ana Zbona

Ana Zbona

Project Manager, Business, civic freedoms & human rights defenders, Business & Human Rights Resource Centre


Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
204A

16:00

Challenges to Digital Rights in Myanmar
The session will be mainly focused on the challenges when it comes to digital rights in Myanmar. The topics will be divided into four: 
  1. The issues (Digital Rights challenges in terms of access, freedom of expression, and privacy)
  2. Legal framework
  3. #DigitalRightsMM movement and
  4. Brief of advocacy to Facebook.


Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:00 - 17:00
201C

16:30

Burn, baby, burn (out?)
What makes our work as human rights activists sustainable?
A recent study shows that trauma and burnout are high among the movements and organizations that work for human rights around the world.
What are the barriers to address that stand in the way of healthy, productive, sustainable ways to achieve change?
And what practices work well to support healthy individuals, organizations, and ecosystems for activism?
What can new, small, or emerging organizations learn from established NGOs struggling with such challenges? What can established NGOs learn from new, small, or emerging organizations? A workshop to share barriers, learnings, and solutions among human rights practitioners.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Nighat Dad

Nighat Dad

Founder and Director, Digital Rights Foundation
avatar for Donna McKay

Donna McKay

Executive Director, Physicians for Human Rights
avatar for Meg Satterthwaite

Meg Satterthwaite

Margaret Satterthwaite (@SatterthwaiteML) is Professor of Clinical Law at NYU School of Law, where she is a Faculty Director of the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice and director of the Global Justice Clinic.
avatar for Joseph Steele

Joseph Steele

Director of Organizational Development and Impact, Access Now


Wednesday May 16, 2018 16:30 - 16:55
Village Main Stage

17:00

Fixing Canada's Broken Access to Information (ATI) System
Canada's Access to Information (ATI) system is broken. In a democracy, the people have a right to know how they are governed. Without transparency, democracy withers and dies. The current government has violated their promises and tabled a "reform" bill worse than the status quo. What concrete steps can we take right now to solve this problem?

Moderators
avatar for J.M. Porup

J.M. Porup

Cybersecurity Reporter, CSO Online
J.M. Porup is a national security && cybersecurity reporter and newsroom security consultant. | | He has covered wrongdoing at the NSA, GCHQ, CSE, and elsewhere. His work has appeared in Ars Technica, CSO Online, The Christian Science Monitor, Slate, Motherboard, The Daily Dot... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Michael Morisy

Michael Morisy

Founder, MuckRock
Michael Morisy is the founder of MuckRock, a non-profit, open source FOIA platform that helps journalists, researchers, and activists around the world better use public records to make our democracy more informed.
avatar for Teresa Scassa

Teresa Scassa

Canada Research Chair in Information Law and Policy, University of Ottawa
My current research focuses on balancing claims to ownership rights in data with the public interest. I also work on privacy and data protection issues. My current projects involve legal issues relating to the scraping of publicly accessible data; data and smart cities; and open... Read More →
avatar for Cara Zwibel

Cara Zwibel

Director, Fundamental Freedoms Program, Canadian Civil Liberties Association
I am a lawyer and program director at the Canadian Civil Liberties Association (CCLA). My work focuses on freedom of expression, freedom of religion, freedom of peaceful assembly, and democratic rights. I have a particular interest in how private actors are increasingly responsib... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:00 - 17:25
Village Main Stage

17:15

Lightning Talks: Fostering Trust and Empathy in the Age of AI
Prioritizing Human Well-Being for Economics and AI (The IEEE Global Initiative on Ethics of Autonomous and Intelligent Systems)

Speakers: John C. Havens

The GDP was galvanized in the 1940's when the world lay in ruins after the second world war where a global focus on exponential growth made sense. But as Bobby Kennedy pointed out in his famous, "Beyond GDP" speech this global metric wasn't built to measure things like the environment or mental health.

Inspired by Kennedy's speech, Bhutan created its Gross National Happiness Index to launch the world's first Well-being Indicator. Evolving over the past thirty years, measures along these lines now include The OECD's Better Life Index, The Social Progress Index, and the Genuine Progress Indicator. These "Beyond GDP" metrics can provide a triple bottom line mentality for technology policy that include measurements beyond economic productivity and growth.

We need metrics valuing human aspects of agency, emotion and identity along with environmental factors to foster genuine societal flourishing. When creating Artificial Intelligence designed to replicate tasks and augment our capabilities, we need to avoid equating exponential growth with holistic prosperity by prioritizing human well-being in the age of the algorithm.

Teaching AI to Explain Itself (Berkman Klein Center at Harvard University)

Speakers: Suchana Seth

A growing body of artificial intelligence algorithms are NOT black-box - they can explain their decision mechanisms. What do "good" explanations look like in the world of accountable algorithms - from the perspective of users, consumers, and regulators of AI? How do we set realistic expectations about explainable or interpretable machine learning algorithms?

The Human in Artificial Intelligence (Samuelson-Glushko Canadian Internet Policy & Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC))

Speakers: David Fewer

The session will detail CIPPIC's work and interest in AI and human rights. CIPPIC’s approach to the emergence of AI focuses on the implications of the technology for human rights. To date, this discussion has tended to focus on transparency and accountability of decisions made by AI that violate privacy rights or equality rights by entertaining discriminatory factors such as race. But human rights are broad, encompassing a vast range of human experiences. Innovation in AI will ensure that this technology will intersect with humans in unforeseen and unexpected ways. In this lightning talk, we will explore some of the less obvious ways that AI will intersect with human rights.

Rise of the Empathic Machines: Technology that Knows how you Feel (Sensum)

Speakers: Gawain Morrison

A quick tour of the current state of tech that measures human emotions, behaviour and physiology, and how it is being trained to respond to us. Understand what is possible to measure with existing tech and what is coming down the line soon. Hear about some of the key considerations for the age of empathic tech, such as privacy, digital sovereignty and the impact on global society.


Speakers
avatar for John C. Havens

John C. Havens

Executive Director, The IEEE Global Initiative on Ethics of Autonomous and Intelligent Systems
I'm focused on the following subjects and welcome any/all conversations: | -Beyond GDP Economics (Indicators like OECD's Better Life Index, etc) | -Artificial Intelligence | -AI Ethics | -Wellbeing (positive psychology) | -The future of Identity (personal data) | -Whatever yo... Read More →
avatar for Gawain Morrison

Gawain Morrison

CEO, Sensum
Gawain Morrison is the CEO and Co-Founder of Sensum, builders of empathic technology for smart mobility, people & places. He has led the company to become world-leaders at measuring & understanding emotions 'in the wild', where people live their lives. Sensum has worked with some... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
205A

17:15

Overcoming the black box problem: Scrutinizing automated decisions in the real world
Automated decisions increasingly mediate civic life. Governments use algorithms to screen immigrants and allocate social services. Corporations rely on software to help in making decisions in vital areas like hiring, credit scoring, and political discourse. There is a growing desire to “open the black box” of complex algorithms and hold the institutions using them accountable. But across the globe, civil society faces a range of challenges as they pursue these goals. Testing the societal impact of algorithms from the outside is one of the biggest challenges for advocacy organizations: A critical amount of data may be needed and privacy provisions must be accounted for. Analysis can be time-consuming and expensive. Additionally, the potential of reidentification and different data formats can make it difficult for researchers to share results and effectively collaborate. Nevertheless, many researchers, journalists, and public interest groups have been able to make real progress in understanding these systems.

In this session, we’ll explore what it means to scrutinize automated systems in the real world, using both technical and non-technical methods. We’ll look at case studies where public actors were able to discover meaningful insights about an automated decision — without having access to the underlying code. And we’ll get a flavor for the many different ways to "hold algorithms accountable." The moderator will first share an overview of findings from research about different methods of scrutiny — both technical and nontechnical — and invited session participants will then describe the work they each did to investigate an automated system. One case study presented will be AlgorithmWatch's “openSCHUFA” project, investigating Germany’s leading credit scoring company. A low SCHUFA score means banks will reject your credit card application, car rentals will reject you as a customer and network providers will say ‘no’ to a new Internet contract. No one knows how accurate SCHUFA’s data is and how it computes its scores, and OpenSCHUFA wants to change this by analyzing thousands of credit records. The project has successfully crowdfunded more than 43,000 Euros and almost 18,000 people have requested their score.

Session leaders will then encourage attendees to share their own work investigating algorithms to promote an understanding that there are many ways to gain more insight into automated decision systems without having access to or being able to understand code. Participants will then have the opportunity to brainstorm other systems worth scrutinizing and how to do so.

Moderators
avatar for Miranda Bogen

Miranda Bogen

Policy Analyst, Upturn
Miranda Bogen is a Policy Analyst at Upturn, where she focuses on the social implications of machine learning and artificial intelligence, and the effect of technology platforms on civil and human rights. She has coauthored reports on data ethics, governing automated decisions, a... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Lorena Jaume-Palasi

Lorena Jaume-Palasi

Founder & Executive Director, AlgorithmWatch
Lorena is the executive director of AlgorithmWatch, a non-profit organisation to evaluate and shed light on algorithmic and automatization processes that have a social relevance. Her work focuses on philosophy of law and ethics of automatization and digitization. Lorena has been... Read More →
avatar for Matthias Spielkamp

Matthias Spielkamp

Founder and Executive Director, AlgorithmWatch
Matthias Spielkamp is founder and executive director of AlgorithmWatch. He is co-founder and publisher of the online magazine iRights.info, which in 2006 received the Grimme Online Award, Germany’s most prestigious award for online journalism. He testified before several commit... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
201C

17:15

Freedom Online Coalition Open Forum
The Freedom Online Coalition (FOC) is an intergovernmental coalition of 30 countries committed to advancing Internet freedom – free expression, association, assembly, and privacy online – worldwide. At this RightsCon Open Forum session, Coalition members will be launching a statement on Internet censorship, give updates on the work of the FOC, present priorities for the German Chairmanship and outline progress towards implementing the FOC Action Plan for 2018. The session will also be an opportunity to learn about FOC's new mechanism for stakeholder engagement, the FOC Advisory Network, and plans for this year's Freedom Online Conference, which will be taking place in Berlin, November 28-30. This event will be a platform for all interested members of the RightsCon community to discuss the work of the FOC and inform its activities in the run up to the Annual Conference. 

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Scott Busby

Scott Busby

Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, U.S. Department of State
Scott Busby serves as Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, DC, where he oversees the Bureau’s work in East Asia and the Pacific as well as on multilateral and global issues, including U.S. e... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
204C

17:15

When One Size Does Not Fit All: Using Low-Tech to Advance Access to Justice and Movement Building in Human Rights
This panel will convene a session surrounding the use of low-tech solutions towards access to justice. It will consist of panelists from the Whistle Project, based out of the Centre of Governance and Human Rights at the University of Cambridge, and Global Rights Nigeria, who have partnered with The Whistle in the development and launch of a digital human rights reporting platform, as a part of their ‘Rape is a Crime’ campaign. It will also feature Amnesty International’s Digital Verification Corps, currently tackling the dearth in tools that combine discovery and verification in human rights reporting and the challenges faced by its analysts, and the Engine Room, whose expertise in the uses of digital data for human rights will be a connecting thread to the discussion.

Whilst the field of digital verification has been increasingly saturated with tools in recent years, there have been challenges in bringing together the process of discovery with the process of verification in one tool. Global Rights Nigeria has relied on capacity and trust-building with communities in varying human rights contexts; a qualitatively rich approach premised on the execution of successful campaigns with clear outcomes. Through their collaboration with The Whistle, the first iteration of a dashboard that connects witnesses and victims of sexual abuse with Global Rights, was developed. Enabling Global Rights Nigeria to facilitate a more expansive, but yet personalised and human campaign for data collection and discovery, the reporting app also seeks to erode prevalent extractiveness in the reporting process, through informing and educating victims and witnesses on next steps and nearby medical, legal and counselling services. Whilst Amnesty International’s Digital Verification Corps has benefitted greatly
from emerging digital verification tools, there has been a gap left behind by tools that do not adequately respond to the workflow needs of the DVC analysts, particularly the need to bring together discovery and verification; a gap that has initiated a conversation across all aforementioned organisations surrounding the need to rethink technologies for human rights reporting and verification.

Global Rights will lead with a presentation providing an overview of the challenges faced in human rights reporting and verification under a resource-constrained domestic human rights architecture. The Whistle team will provide an introduction to the product, and the gaps it sought to - and still seeks to - mitigate in both the discovery and verification space, which will be further expanded by Amnesty International.


As The Whistle project enters the development of the second-generation of its dashboard, Global Rights Nigeria nears the conclusion of the ‘Rape is a Crime’ campaign, and the Digital Verification Corps expands to more labs and analysts, the panel poses and addresses the need to develop discovery and verification tools in conversation with activist movements and campaigns. As the process of discovery will vary depending on socio-political and workflow contexts, so these coalitions become ever the more crucial. As such, the panel is also an opportunity to involve relevant experts (such as developers of digital verification and discovery tools from Benetech and RightsLab, and practitioners from the International Criminal Court), activist groups, and the broader audience, in an interactive discussion and ideation session on developing solutions for distinct human rights contexts. The panel’s aim is to:

1) Discover possibilities for scaling the approach to a modular version applicable to other contexts;
2) Identifying the challenges in sustainable reporting;
3) Learning about obstacles in terms of security.

Moderators
avatar for Alix Dunn

Alix Dunn

Executive Director, The Engine Room
Alix is a specialist in organisational development and strategy, and technology for social change. She advises partners on how to use data and technology effectively, responsibly and impactfully. She is a leading trainer and advisor in data and technology for partners ranging fro... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Radha Friedman

Radha Friedman

Director of Programs, World Justice Project
Radha Friedman leads the World Justice Project’s efforts to engage nontraditional actors to advance the rule of law. Radha’s work has spanned five continents on a variety of justice issues—land rights for women (co-founder and Deputy Director of Landesa’s Center for Women... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
204A

17:15

Mobilizing during Internet Shutdowns: Re-purposing Interactive Voice Response for Activism
Internet shutdowns have become rampant across Africa. Activists are often shut out from reaching the masses with vital information and vice versa. At the same time, mobile penetration across the continent continues to soar with increasing coverage. In Interactive Voice Response (IVR) lies a solution to reach people while transcending the barriers of language, literacy and logistics for citizens across the continent. IVR is a cost-effective means of high volume 2-way communication in low-resource settings.

This session will walk participants through what IVR is, how it works and successful use cases from across sub-Saharan Africa. Participants will be able learn how to set up an IVR campaign to send and receive information across mobile networks in order to continue research, activism and advocacy.

Speakers
avatar for Neema Iyer

Neema Iyer

Founder, Pollicy
Civic Technologist, working on the data revolution in Uganda (and East Africa), Digital Rights, Creative Media, Open Data! Come say hi!


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
200B

17:15

Tech Demo Block #2: Digital engagement and collaboration tools
Promoting Women's Human Rights in Morocco and Tunisia through Participatory On-Line Court Decision Observatories (MRA Mobilising for Rights Associates)

Speakers: 
Saida Kouzzi & Stephanie Willman Bordat

In this session, we will share our www.marsadnissa.ma and www.marsadnissa.tn on-line Observatories of domestic court decisions in women's rights cases, intended to be dynamic, participatory, practical tools for research, monitoring and advocacy on women’s rights. The trilingual (Arabic, French, and English) databases are designed to contain a host of diverse judicial decisions from local courts across Morocco and Tunisia.

In Morocco and Tunisia, there are currently no systems for collecting and publishing court decisions such as in Court Reporters, Recueils de jurisprudence, or online tools such as Westlaw or LexisNexis. There are no publicly accessible sources that gather and publish cases from the First Instance and other lower courts, where the majority of cases concerning women’s rights are decided.

The two Observatories hope to promote (a) innovative and rights-based changes to court decisions, (b) improved local NGO, lawyer, and public actor knowledge, skills and systems for comprehensive monitoring, documentation, analysis and advocacy on women’s human rights, and (c) increased accountability, transparency and responsiveness of the justice system in women's rights cases.

We will make an interactive presentation to walk participants through the website platform, highlighting in particular the multicriteria search engine that allows activists to monitor strategic variables in court decisions and the participatory process by which the database is built-up through an organic process designed to create a community of practice.

Amnesty Decoders: on small tasks, big data and massive engagement (Amnesty International)

Speakers: 
Milena Marin

Amnesty Decoders is a global platform inspiring digital volunteers to contribute to ground breaking human rights research. Join this talk to learn how Amnesty International engaged tens of thousands of digital volunteers to sift through satellite images, documents, pictures and social media streams.

Building a Better Opposition With Pursuance: Large-Scale, Secure Collaboration for Activists, Journalists, and Non-Profits (PursuanceBeyond)

Speakers: 
Steve Phillips

This session will showcase Pursuance, an open-source, encrypted software platform that provides an effective means for anyone -- activists, journalists, nonprofits, and citizens -- from around the world to organize into a network of robust, agile entities called "pursuances." The purpose of this platform is to make large-scale collaboration radically more effective. Award-winning journalist, activist, and Pursuance founder Barrett Brown has envisioned this platform as a means of amplifying the organic self-organizing dynamics that characterize online activist communities and initiatives like Anonymous and Project PM. By providing functionality that is attuned to these digital dynamics, Pursuance thereby empowers civic and political activism outside of traditional organizational models. Ultimately we aim to foster an energetic global network of forward-thinking individuals capable of addressing large-scale social and political issues.


Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Willman Bordat

Stephanie Willman Bordat

Founding Partner, MRA Mobilising for Rights Associates
I'm an international human rights lawyer, women's rights NGO activist, and university study abroad professor, based in Rabat Morocco for over 20 years and working to promote women's human rights in Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria and Libya. Happy to speak about anything related to wom... Read More →
avatar for Saida Kouzzi

Saida Kouzzi

Founding Partener, Mobilising for Rights Associates
avatar for Steve Phillips

Steve Phillips

Tech Lead, Project Manager, Pursuance
Techno-activist. Programmer. Thinker. Doer. Tech Lead and Project Manager of Pursuance: secure, large-scale coordination for activists, journalists, and nonprofits. | | I love democratizing forces and revolutionary projects.


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
200A

17:15

Challenging our own digital security training communication and didactics
To what extent are trainers and NGOs do digital security training and awareness around the globe actually effective reaching out to people so they can understand the threats and change their habits, protocols and tech use? Have we assessed our methodologies, communication approaches and didactics to see if they are working and how to make them more effective?

This session will challenge different trainers and communicators to share where they have been effective influence others in digital security communications and trainings. This will be a facilitated session in a fishbowl format with international trainers and communicators attending RightsCon. In an open format we will assess what needs to be revised, tested and done to learn more from our past mistakes and strengthen our tactics, activities and approaches. Please step-in and share!

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Pilar Saenz

Pilar Saenz

Project Manager, Karisma Foundation
Physicist by profession but activist by vocation. I'm a free software, open technology and open culture enthusiast. I'm a consultant in education and technology issues. I work in Karisma Foundation as projects manager and as a researcher on issues related to free culture and Inte... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
201B

17:15

A manifesto for the inclusive engineer
Gender gaps persist in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields, despite many well-meaning efforts. For example, the engineering association IEEE has 11% women members. Advocacy and outreach to girls, as well as recruiting, retention, and advancement programs for professionals, are necessary to grow the next generation of women engineers. Many initiatives aim to close these gaps, yet they do not often tell individuals how to be part of the solution or engage in a personal way.

We aim to support engineers who want to be more inclusive in their daily interactions in their workplaces. As a complement (not substitute) for what is required or expected of companies/organizations, we will jointly produce concrete steps that individuals can take  to help create a more inclusive work environment around them. What can the average engineer do to support processes and tech that is more inclusive? 

The resources we develop will help raise awareness of the role of individuals in changing institutions and attacking gender gaps from the ground up.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Micek

Peter Micek

Global Policy & Legal Counsel, Access Now


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
206B

17:15

Language Access and Humanitarian Response: A Matter of Human Rights
The world is seeing an unprecedented scale of migration due to conflict and climate-related natural disasters, and people from very different linguistic backgrounds are coming together in a number of humanitarian contexts—rapid response work, logistics and support in refugee sites and general communications in job placement sites and shelters. Without the ability to communicate effectively with each other, both aid workers and beneficiaries stand to lose significantly.

In this panel, members of Meedan and Outside will share their experiences in the field in dialogue with others who are looking at issues of language barriers in humanitarian work. In the first 30 minutes, we will bring our perspective from field contexts that span southern Serbia to Greece, in sites where refugees and aid workers come nearly a dozen different language backgrounds.

In the latter 45 minutes, we will then open up the conversation to the audience to discuss the challenges they’ve seen in their work, specifically with regards to language and access. This format will borrow from Outside’s Humanitarian Design Workshop, also known as Design Thinking To Save Lives. In this interactive workshop, participants learn and apply the principles of Humanitarian Design to create real things that reduce suffering and save lives, with a specific focus on language. The goal is to exercise the principles of Humanitarian Design in a risk-free environment with experienced, real-world practitioners.

This conversation continues from RightsCon 2016, where Meedan hosted a conversation with members of InterNews, Global Voices and 18 Million Rising on issues of language, and we hope to discuss core principles and best practices around access.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Jovan Jelicic

Jovan Jelicic

T4D - Global Connectivity Manager, MercyCorps
As Global Connectivity Manager, Mercy Corps Technology for Development department (T4D), my responsibility is to deliver sustainable, secure Wi-Fi networks to high-density environments in different regions of the world. Since 2016 I've been heavily engaged in Syrian response cris... Read More →
avatar for Dragana Kaurin

Dragana Kaurin

Executive Director, Localization Lab
Dragana is a human rights researcher and ethnographer based in New York, and writes about refugees, forced migration, civic tech innovation, and digital security. She is the founder and director of Localization Lab, an organization that provides localization support and user feed... Read More →
avatar for Tom Trewinnard

Tom Trewinnard

Programs & Partnerships, Meedan
Tom Trewinnard (UK) is Director of Programs at Meedan, a social technology non-profit working on the Check project to develop collaborative verification tools and open training curricula. He is a co-founder of Pop-Up Newsrooms, which has led major collaborative reporting initiati... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
205C

17:15

Platform Politick: Redefining Digital Rights for the Platform Generation
Our panel seeks to engage with the multiple policy challenges that the platform economy presents for rights –whether they be the labor rights of workers, consumer rights of the user, the political and data rights of the citizen, the collective rights of marginalized communities, or the right to development and equitable trade for countries at the margins of capitalism. Through the session we will examine the economic and social outcomes of platformization and what they mean for the larger questions of openness, diversity and inclusion.

Moderators
avatar for Mark Graham

Mark Graham

Director, The Wayback Machine, Internet Archive
I would like to connect with people about how to make the web more useful and reliable. With a focus on archiving born digital content.

Speakers

Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
200C

17:15

Crypto Wars Revisited?
This session explores the current encryption debate from a critical, multi-stakeholder perspective. The politics of encryption are highly contested, engaging difficult legal questions and deeply held values. Encryption enables human rights and fundamental freedoms, fosters economic innovation, and is a critical guarantor of global security and public safety. The technology is essential to the work of human rights advocates journalists, lawyers, and government officials themselves. At the same time, it remains a source of investigative friction, posing barriers to law enforcement and intelligence agencies in the course of their duties.

Historically, attempts to craft tailored and rights-respecting policy in response to those challenges have failed. Yet over the last year, there has been a renewed and concerted effort from high level officials (particularly in Five Eyes countries) to secure new powers to limit public access to strong encryption. Against this backdrop, the panel will debate established legal narratives, examine investigative challenges, and explore the human rights impacts (and practical consequences) of encryption policy. This session also aims to lay the groundwork for deeper conversations, more intensive workshops, and closed strategic meetings on the issue of encryption throughout RightsCon.

Moderators
avatar for Amie Stepanovich

Amie Stepanovich

U.S. Policy Manager, Access Now

Speakers
avatar for Mahsa Alimardani

Mahsa Alimardani

Internet Researcher, ARTICLE19/OXFORD INTERNET INSTITUTE
Mahsa Alimardani is a Iranian-Canadian Internet researcher. She currently helps lead some of the digital rights programs on Iran with ARTICLE19 and is a doctoral student at the Oxford Internet Institute, studying the politics of platforms in Iran.
avatar for Aled Lloyd Owen

Aled Lloyd Owen

Head of Encryption Policy, HM Government


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
206C

17:15

Is there an app for that? Meeting the technology needs of displaced persons

Join us and explore the roles technology can play in systemic solutions to displaced populations crises.  Through an interactive discussion among experts, activists, innovators, and session attendees, we will:

  • Review specific needs of refugee and internally displaced populations across geographies;
  • Highlight well-established and still-developing technologies' failures and successes in addressing needs of displaced persons; and,
  • Develop actionable recommendations for technology companies and human rights organizations.

We will focus on two case studies:

- A research project to assess how technology may support child refugees in Central America (UNICEF + Article One).

- The use of Blockchain tech in financial and identity services for internally displaced populations.


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Brandie Nonnecke

Brandie Nonnecke

Postdoc; Research & Development Manager, UC Berkeley
CITRUS, UC Davis
avatar for Chloe Poynton

Chloe Poynton

Principal, Article One
Chloe is a Principal at Article One, a business & human rights consulting firm that works with companies, institutions, and state agencies to develop and implement strategies to promote corporate respect for human rights.


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
205B

17:15

Open Innovation in Africa: Access, Intellectual Property, and Trade
The age-old stereotypical image of Africa as a “dark” continent has undermined Africa’s immense potential for and contribution to the global innovation and creativity. As such, the innovation or knowledge generated in the continent is dubbed “traditional” in contradistinction with the “modern” innovation in the West. In defiance of this profound distortion, Africa is rather emerging as a continent with rich innovative insights and experiences. Its emergence as a rising continent is visible from its increasing role in the global geopolitical and economic spheres.

Yet, the lingering effect of the stereotype tends to overshadow the enormous innovative potential of the societies in the continent. Often, Africa is treated as a mere recipient of innovative ideas and technology that in turn serve as disguised justifications for the entrenchment of Western conception of intellectual property system in the continent. In effect, neglected is the vast arrays of local creativity and innovation that occur both in the formal and informal sectors in Africa. It is noted that the existing IP modalities tend to both undermine and undervalue African innovation and creativity.

Refuting untested assumptions about innovation in the continent, very illuminative of the reality are the studies by the Open African Innovation Research (Open AIR). Exploring major research themes comprising high tech hubs, informal sector, indigenous entrepreneurship, and legal and policy metrics, Open AIR studies not only reveal the flourishing innovation through collaborative dynamics in Africa but also highlight the linkage among access, IP and trade as well as the development of appropriate metrics. For instance, mobile technologies, 3D printing, and maker-spaces in the high-tech hubs, traditional knowledge-driven artisan creative works in the informal and indigenous entrepreneurship are among the several instances of the emerging innovative areas across Africa. The collaborative innovation dynamics in the continent also meshes well with the notion of open innovation and open development.

Against this backdrop arises the interplay among access, IP and trade and the consequent implications on the various rights involved. While open innovation is vital for sustainable development in Africa, fostering innovation requires access to knowledge, robust and context-sensitive IP system and inclusive markets. Thus, this panel will examine these issues in relation to education, agriculture and engineering technology that constitute the major context for an open innovation—all in the context of digitization and digital rights.

The issue of access is critical both for education and agriculture as they depend on IP-protected in knowledge goods such as educational materials and seeds respectively. At least, involved in this issue of access to the essential inputs are numerous IP and data-related considerations. From copyright perspective, worth exploring is an ongoing study that looks into interplay between copyright and the right to tertiary education in the context of access to learning materials. Likewise, critical are the issues of data-driven agriculture in the context of access to seeds for food security in Africa. Further, important issues that implicate various rights are those involved in open innovation occurring in hardware, robotics, artificial intelligence (AI) and 3D printing. All these important issues are being explored by Open AIR researchers.

Given the critical importance of access rights for innovation-driven development in Africa, the exploration of the interplay among access, IP and trade in the context of open innovation by the panelists and the active engagement of the audience are very vital at this point in time. Addressing the issues in a manner that fosters open innovation requires an in-depth deliberation of the various stakeholders, academia, civil societies and policy makers.

Committed to promoting an evidence-based innovation and IP policy reform in Africa and beyond through research and dialogue, Open AIR is the leading interdisciplinary research network of renowned scholars and emerging researchers from diverse fields.

This session is going to discuss emerging issues relating to IP in Africa, from a uniquely African perspective, including the relationship between IP protection and digital agriculture and databases, local innovation, indigenous inventions and traditional knowledge, innovation by women and refugees. At the end of discussions, a table will be drawn up of five principles relevant to IP in Africa.

Moderators
avatar for Jeremy de Beer

Jeremy de Beer

Full Professor and Co-Director, Open AIR, University of Ottawa
Jeremy de Beer creates and shapes ideas about innovation, intellectual property, and international trade and development. He is an award-winning law professor at the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Law and member of the Centre for Law, Technology, and Society. He is a co-foun... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Helen Chuma-Okoro

Helen Chuma-Okoro

Senior Research Fellow, Nigerian Institute of Advanced Legal Studies
Helen Chuma-Okoro is a Research Fellow at the Nigerian Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (NIALS). She is also a member of the New and Emerging Researchers Group (NERG), which is a group of emerging scholars engaged in researching about Africa, under the auspices of the Open Afr... Read More →
avatar for Tobias Schonwetter

Tobias Schonwetter

Director: IP Unit, University of Cape Town
Dr. Tobias Schonwetter is the Director of the Intellectual Property Unit and an Associate Professor at the University of Cape Town's law faculty. He currently is a Principal Investigator for various intellectual property-related research and capacity building projects, including... Read More →
avatar for Nicole Tumaine

Nicole Tumaine

Interim Program Manager & Research Fellow, Open AIR, University of Ottawa
Nicole Tumaine is passionate about international development issues, especially refugee affairs and international law. She holds a B.Soc. in International Development, with a minor in Life Sciences, from the University of Ottawa. As of September 2018, Nicole will be pursuing a jo... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
203A

17:15

Fingerprint on the pulse: Challenging the lack of privacy protections for biometric data.
Entities all over the world are adopting the use of biometric technology for an array of purposes like identification, electoral registries and policing, amongst others. A significant number of those entities are in states that do not have sufficient data protection laws. This means that this data is collected, is shared and further processed by various public and private entities, without subjecting them to any regulations which normally require them to protect the data throughout its lifecycle and respecting the rights of individuals, amongst other obligations and duties. This enables these actors to evade any sort of accountability and oversight thus denying individuals any access to complaint mechanisms and redress. This context raises grave concerns of abuse and misuse of biometric data which could have adverse negative effects on individuals’ enjoyment of their fundamental rights.

Biometric data is categorized as sensitive information and it is currently being processed in a complete legal and regulatory void. Not only that, it is extremely difficult to find out exactly what is being collected and how it is being stored and shared, particularly by private companies. There is an urgent to adopt and enforce need for practical legal and regulatory frameworks in these regulate and oversee effectively the processing of all data by both public and private actors in their capacities as data controllers and/or processors.

In countries like India, Kenya and even Somaliland, state agencies are collecting biometric data massively for voter registration and other purposes yet the countries lack proper laws on data protection and privacy rights.
In this session, we will bring together international civil society panelists each of whom are in varying stages of researching on the use of biometrics in their jurisdictions, the risks data subjects are exposed to due to lack of legal framework and proposed solutions in getting data protection laws finally being legislated or enforced. The panelists will to identify and share the motivations of the adoption of biometric technologies in their jurisdictions such as fool proof electoral systems and national identification programs, the legal, cultural and ethical issues that arise; and what they think will be the best way forward lobbying and pushing for legislation of a data protection law. The panelists will also exchange ideas, share lessons learned and, in collaboration with active participants in the audience, work toward addressing the issue of use of biometric data and data protection mechanisms.

Moderators
avatar for Lucy Purdon

Lucy Purdon

Policy Officer, Privacy International
| | Lucy is Policy Officer with Privacy International and leads the global policy work on cybersecurity and identity. She works across the organisation and with international partners to develop policy recommendations and positions based on research project findings. | | Lucy... Read More →

Speakers
HB

Hyra Basit

Digital Rights Foundation
avatar for Wafa Ben-Hassine

Wafa Ben-Hassine

Policy Counsel, MENA, Access Now
Wafa Ben-Hassine is Access Now's MENA Policy Counsel. Access Now is a global organization that works to defend and extend the digital rights of users at rights.
avatar for Miguel Morachimo

Miguel Morachimo

Executive Director, Hiperderecho
Miguel Morachimo is a lawyer from the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru and holds a Masters in Law, Science, and Technology from Stanford University. Currently, he is the Executive Director of Hiperderecho, a Peruvian nonprofit organization devoted to facilitating public und... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
202B

17:15

Preserving Human Rights: Creating a Secure Ethical and Distributed Ecosystem to Archive At-Risk Mobile Media
This session includes human rights technologists from four organisations who will focus on the ethical collection, authentication, and preservation of documentation of sensitive mobile media captured by mobile phones. Panelists from OpenArchive, Guardian Project, Freedom of the Press Foundation, and GreenHost will discuss their work to create a secure ecosystem for managing the lifecycle of at-risk mobile media, with a specific focus on improving usability by tailoring tools to the communities they serve by incorporating ethnographic research early in the process. Each panelist will discuss use cases and the ways their work strives to improve digital agency and security in order to protect civil liberties. We will share how the technologies we build address issues arising at the intersection of human rights, free speech, ethical technology, and narrative agency.

We are a diverse panel and want to take advantage of the uniquely attuned group assembled at RightsCon to bring the narrative to the forefront in a cohesive, substantial, and action-oriented way. The panelists will provide an overview of the successes, challenges and opportunities faced by human-rights technologists working to create accurate, preservation-standard records online from a technical and community-based participatory design perspective. We will share mobile and desktop applications we work on and identify pain points and insights gleaned since their respective deployments with the goal of collaborating with each other and audience members to address these challenges. The panelists will then have a discussion with the participants to learn about concerns and new threat models, discuss inventive ways to manage pain points, and strategize creative and effective ways to leverage the work into participant communities.

The panel will be followed by a workshop and training where we can share our technologies with the RightsCon community and gain valuable feedback for future improvements.

Speakers
avatar for Natalie Cadranel

Natalie Cadranel

Founder & Director, OpenArchive
Natalie is the founder and director of OpenArchive, a free, open-source mobile--archive project for those managing sensitive mobile media. Leveraging the efforts of the Internet Archive, Tor, the Guardian Project, and Creative Commons, this media ecosystem gives history's first r... Read More →
avatar for Nathan Freitas

Nathan Freitas

Director, Guardian Project
Nathan Freitas is the Founder and Director of the Guardian Project, a Brooklyn-based open-source mobile security community, whose apps include Orbot (Tor for Android), ChatSecure (encrypted chat and file sharing), and ObscuraCam (auto-face-blur!), and developer libraries includin... Read More →
avatar for Kaustubh Srikanth

Kaustubh Srikanth

Greenhost
Kaustubh Srikanth is a hacktivist, technologist, and researcher based in Berlin. He's currently with Greenhost, where he spends most of his time on working on Totem Project, an online learning platform that aims to offer digital security training courses for human rights defender... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
204B
  • Host Organization OpenArchive, Guardian Project, Freedom of the Press Foundation, Green Host
  • Tags Session ID 605

17:15

Forget about the President- let's talk to Facebook
Why "forget the President?" Because from free expression to physical safety, company decisions around policy, design, and enforcement today can affect people’s lives as much as decisions made by elected officials. That’s why civil society has started to engage with companies as if they were elected bodies. Today, advocates from organizations all over the world- but especially from the United States- are trying to communicate with companies about vulnerable users, data use policies, content enforcement, and more.

In this workshop, company representatives, advocates, and activists will talk about the process of tech company advocacy- how it works, case studies on
successes and failures, and critiques- including how this process
centers voices from the United States, and how we can do better at avoiding this problem. The goal is to provide activists and advocates with a better idea of the who, what, why, and how of this type of work, and to provide companies with a better understanding of why we're doing it and what it costs in terms
of time, trauma, and more.


Moderators
avatar for Sam Gregory

Sam Gregory

Program Director, WITNESS
In short....video, human rights, citizen participation, role of companies, AI and deep fakes/content moderation, live video and experiential activism | | In long...Sam Gregory is Program Director of WITNESS (www.witness.org), which supports anyone anywhere to use video and techn... Read More →

Speakers
DK

Dia Kayyali

Program Manager, tech + advocacy, WITNESS
Dia Kayyali coordinates WITNESS’ tech + advocacy work, engaging with technology companies and working on tools and policies that help human rights advocates safely, securely and ethically document human rights abuses and expose them to the world.
avatar for Alexa Koenig

Alexa Koenig

Executive Director, Human Rights Center, UC Berkeley
Alexa is the executive director of the Human Rights Center (winner of the 2015 MacArthur Award for Creative and Effective Institutions) and a lecturer-in-residence at UC Berkeley School of Law, where she teaches classes on human rights and international criminal law. She co-chair... Read More →
AR

Afsaneh Rigot

ARTICLE 19
Article 19 is a London-based human rights organization with a specific mandate and focus on the defense and promotion of freedom of expression and freedom of information worldwide founded in 1987. Afsaneh, works on Iran human rights issues in the MENA region, predominately freed... Read More →
avatar for Peter Stern

Peter Stern

Policy Manager for Stakeholder Engagement, Facebook
Peter Stern is a Manager in the Product Policy group at Facebook in Menlo Park, California. Product Policy is responsible for writing and interpreting global policies governing what users can share on Facebook, and how advertisers and developers interact with the site. Peter lead... Read More →
avatar for Alex Walden

Alex Walden

Counsel, Free Expression & Human Rights, Google
Alex Walden leads Google’s work on free expression and human rights on the international policy team. Her work includes representing Google in the Global Network Initiative (GNI) and in various multilateral fora dealing with controversial content. Alex joined Google from The Ra... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
206A

17:15

Scrutinizing the Little Brothers: Corporate Surveillance and the Roles of the Citizen, Consumer, and Company
In this session, we will bring together panelists from Toronto University’s Citizen Lab, the Berkman Klein Center at Harvard University, and Consumer Reports, each of whom are addressing issues of corporate surveillance and accountability. Both Citizen Lab and Consumer Reports will focus on ways of empowering the individual. The Berkman Center will describe their project that aims to give companies toolkits to provide transparency to the public.

The panelists will each share an overview of their organization’s goal for their respective project, the challenges their programs are facing, and what change they hope their project will effectuate. The goal is to present the three different approaches that their projects reflect: the consumer, the citizen, and the company. All three projects are responses to pervasive corporate surveillance and how the projects aim to lessen the imbalance between the corporation and the individual.

Moderators
avatar for Katie McInnis

Katie McInnis

Policy Counsel, Consumers Union
Katie McInnis is a policy counsel in Consumers Union’s Washington DC office. Her work focuses on technology and the consumer’s right to privacy, security, control, and transparency. Before joining CU in 2016, Katie served as a Privacy & Technology Fellow at the Center for Dem... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Michael Connor

Michael Connor

Executive Director, Open MIC
Michael Connor is the founding Executive Director of Open MIC, a non-profit that works to foster greater corporate accountability in the media and technology sectors, principally through shareholder engagement. Working with impact investors, Open MIC identifies, develops and supp... Read More →
avatar for David O'Brien

David O'Brien

Senior Researcher, Berkman Klein Center at Harvard University
I'm a senior researcher at Harvard's Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, where I direct privacy and cybersecurity related research projects. I'm a lawyer by way of background, but that's a small part of who I am and how I think. | | I'm interested in everything from... Read More →
avatar for Christopher Parsons

Christopher Parsons

Research Associate, Citizen Lab
Dr. Christopher Parsons received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the University of Guelph, and his Ph.D from the University of Victoria. He is the Managing Director of the Telecom Transparency Project and a Research Associate at the Citizen Lab, in the Munk School... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
203B

17:15

Gendering Surveillance: From the Point of View of Marginalised Groups
The session will discuss how people from marginalised groups experience surveillance of multiple kinds, including societal and state-sponsored surveillance, in their daily lives. In the context these oppressed groups, a person
belonging to an LGBTQI+ community experiences monitoring differently than a cisgendered person, and similarly a person who identifies themselves as a woman experiences this surveillance differently than that of their male counterparts. While the comparison on which kind of surveillance is worse than the other can’t be made or justified, it’s important to identify this as a gendered issue - one that the people already living at the brink of oppression encounter in their daily lives, be it at the workplace in the form of CCTV cameras strategically angled, or at public spaces in the form of uncomfortable male gaze, or in an attempt to ‘cleanse’ the society by continuous clampdown on gender minority.

This session aims at bringing together vocal activists from diverse backgrounds and orientations to represent their communities and discuss the many struggles that the people face in their daily routines as a result of this continuous surveillance of many forms.

The conversation will last 60 minutes, and five to six panelists will be speaking for 5-7 minutes each, and whereas the last 10 minutes will be reserved for Q&A session with the audience.

Moderators
avatar for Nighat Dad

Nighat Dad

Founder and Director, Digital Rights Foundation

Speakers
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression and clinical professor of law at the University of California, Irvine, School of Law. 
avatar for Anja Kovacs

Anja Kovacs

Director, Internet Democracy Project
Dr. Anja Kovacs directs the Internet Democracy Project in Delhi. India, which works towards an Internet that supports freedom of expression, democracy and social justice. Anja’s research currently focuses especially on questions regarding cybersecurity, surveillance and privacy... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Courtney Radsch

Dr. Courtney Radsch

Advocacy Director, Committee to Protect Journalists
Dr. Courtney Radsch is the Advocacy Director of the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ). As a journalist, researcher, and freedom of expression advocate, she writes and speaks frequently on the nexus of technology, journalism, and rights. She is the author of Cyberactivism a... Read More →
avatar for Thenmozhi Soundararajan

Thenmozhi Soundararajan

Thenmozhi is an artist, activist, and technologist with Equality Labs., Equality Labs
Equality Labs


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
206D

17:15

Reclaiming Her Voice: Practical Solutions to Online Violence Against Women in Politics and Journalism

This session will be an interactive, solutions-oriented panel discussion about strategies for understanding and effectively combating online violence against women in public life - particularly journalists and women in politics. Harassment and other types of violence against women online affects women in journalism and politically active women alike, and manifests in a variety of forms on almost every online platform available.Indeed, the media’s slow response to harassment of women within their own industry has arguably led to an inability to appropriately deal with the harassment of other women online - including politically-active women. For both women in politics and in journalism, there is often a lack if infrastructure - be it within political parties, from social media platforms, or on the part of media organizations - to address harassment and combat the problem of violence online. This can result in a chilling effect for women online, including through choosing not to participate in leadership or political debates, re-evaluating the types of journalistic beats they cover, deactivating or permanently deleting their online accounts, or even leaving their profession entirely. The resulting limitation of both the number of women able to participate and the range of issues discussed in politics and the media poses a fundamental challenge to democracy, progress towards gender equality and women’s empowerment, as well as to the integrity of the information space.

The panel will engage experts across multiple sectors including civic technology, gender equality, and democracy and governance to discuss methods for building international understanding of this issue and identifying strategies for combating it. It will also include tangible examples from women in these sectors who have experienced this type of violence. A moderator will first introduce the issue of online violence against women in politics and in journalism, framing the issue for the audience and highlighting the key issues to be explored in the session. The moderator will then open the floor to allow each additional speaker to share their perspectives, experiences and approaches they have utilized through a series of guiding questions and facilitate a lively dialogue between the speakers and for frequent engagement with the audience. The goal is the participants will work together to (1) raise awareness of the prevalence and anti-democratic impacts of online violence against women in politics and in journalism; (2) foster knowledge- and idea-sharing among panelists and audience participants of the strategies for understanding, documenting, and combating this type of online violence; and (3) emerge with tangible takeaways and a framework for thinking about best practices to combat online violence across sectors.


Moderators
avatar for Sandra Pepera

Sandra Pepera

Director of Gender, Women and Democracy, National Democratic Institute
Sandra Pepera is a career diplomat and international development professional. Before joining NDI as its director for Gender, Women and Democracy in 2014, she spent thirteen years as a senior officer at the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), including leading... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Daniel O'Maley

Daniel O'Maley

Associate Editor, Center for Intl Media Assistance
I'm the Associate Editor at the Center for International Media Assistance. My portfolio includes Internet policy and tech innovation. Anyone interested in publishing reports on these topics in terms of how they relate to media should get in touch with me.
avatar for Dr. Courtney Radsch

Dr. Courtney Radsch

Advocacy Director, Committee to Protect Journalists
Dr. Courtney Radsch is the Advocacy Director of the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ). As a journalist, researcher, and freedom of expression advocate, she writes and speaks frequently on the nexus of technology, journalism, and rights. She is the author of Cyberactivism a... Read More →
avatar for Nani Jansen Reventlow

Nani Jansen Reventlow

Director, Digital Freedom Fund
Nani Jansen Reventlow is the founding Director of the Digital Freedom Fund, which supports partners in Europe to advance digital rights through strategic litigation. Nani is also an Associate Tenant at Doughty Street Chambers and an Affiliate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, where she was a 2016-2017 Fellow. She has been an advisor to Harvard’s Cyberlaw Clinic since 2016.Nani is a recognised international lawyer and expert in human rights litigation responsible for groundbreaking freedom of expression cases across several national and international jurisdictions. Between 2011 and 2016, Nani has overseen the litigation practice of the Media Legal Defence Initiative (MLDI) globally. As a Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center, Nani developed the Catalysts for Collaboration website (https://catalystsforcollaboration.org), which offers a set of best practices and case studies encouraging activists to collaborate across disciplinary silos and use strategic litigation in digital rights... Read More →
avatar for Derek Ruths

Derek Ruths

Chief Architect, Charitable Analytics International
Derek Ruths is co-founder of CAI, a charity focused on bringing the power of data science to social good initiatives. He is also Associate Professor of Computer Science at McGill University, and the Director of the McGill Centre for Social and Cultural Data Science. In these ca... Read More →


Wednesday May 16, 2018 17:15 - 18:15
201A
 
Thursday, May 17
 

08:00

A Human Rights Approach to Regulating User-Generated Content Online: Preview of the UN Special Rapporteur’s Report to the Human Rights Council

Please join us for a special preview of the Special Rapporteur’s upcoming report on State regulation and commercial moderation of user-generated online content. The Special Rapporteur examines how States should fulfill their primary duty is to ensure an enabling environment for freedom of expression and access to information online, even in the face of contemporary threats such as “fake news” and online extremism. The Special Rapporteur also conducts an in-depth investigation of how Internet companies moderate content on major social media platforms, and argues that human rights law gives companies the tools to articulate their positions in ways that respect democratic norms and counter authoritarian demands. The report is the culmination of a year-long series of consultations, visits to major internet companies and a wide range of State and civil society input.



Speakers
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression and clinical professor of law at the University of California, Irvine, School of Law. 


Thursday May 17, 2018 08:00 - 08:50
206C

09:00

Auditing Algorithms
This panel will convene experts from different fields to explore models of accountability and oversight for the use of algorithms in automated decision systems that impact social and criminal justice. The panel will bring together people from the technology community, academia, legal practitioners, and the government who have called for algorithmic accountability and assess practical approaches to auditing algorithms. The panel will address the difficulty that policymakers and courts have in understanding the roles played by algorithms in government functions, as well as the unique hurdles involved in ensuring that they are functioning in a manner that is accurate, accountable, and fair. Panelists will also evaluate current oversight methods and proposals, including first-of-its-kind legislation in New York City to increase algorithmic transparency, as well as a Massachusetts bill that would require bias-testing and validation for the use of a “risk assessment” tool in criminal proceedings. Finally, the panel will explore options to “fix” errant algorithms and automate parts of the oversight process.

Moderators
avatar for Michael Price

Michael Price

Senior Litigation Counsel, Fourth Amendment Center at the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers
Michael Price serves as Senior Litigation Counsel for the Fourth Amendment Center at NACDL, which provides the defense bar with resources and litigation support designed to preserve privacy rights in the digital age. Michael focuses on cutting-edge Fourth Amendment issues includi... Read More →

Speakers
RR

Rashida Richardson

AI Now Institute
avatar for Brittny Saunders

Brittny Saunders

Deputy Commissioner for Strategic Initiatives, New York City Commission on Human Rights
Brittny Saunders is Deputy Commissioner for Strategic Initiatives at the NYC Commission on Human Rights (“Commission”). At the Commission, Brittny manages key inter-agency partnerships and special projects related to data-driven discrimination and racial justice among others... Read More →
avatar for vincent southerland

vincent southerland

Executive Director, Center on Race, Inequality, and the Law at NYU Law School
He has dedicated his career to advancing racial justice and civil rights. Vincent joined the Center after serving as an Assistant Federal Public Defender with the Federal Defenders for the Southern District of New York since 2015. Prior to his time at the Federal Defenders, Vinc... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
206B

09:00

The Global Digital Platform and the Nation State: Roles responsibilities and interactions to optimize human rights in the digital space
Governments, academia, international organizations, and global platforms are going back to the drawing board, contemplating their capabilities and obligations regarding human rights in the digital space. Numerous challenges to freedom of expression in the digital information ecosystem have prompted this reflection, with all eyes on global platforms that operate across borders – arguably wielding the most power to shape human rights policy on the web.

The expansion of global platforms raises new questions about the responsibilities of public and private actors in protecting human rights. On one hand, platforms may be seen to act as de facto sovereigns, wielding greater economic power than many nations and imposing their own rules to govern user behavior and expression. On the other hand, platforms may serve as mechanisms to extend the power of national governments. Under domestic law as currently understood in most countries, platforms may lawfully constrain (through TOS or Community Guidelines) individual users in ways that a state may not -- for example, by prohibiting offensive-but-lawful speech or by silencing individual users without fair process. A state that coerces or persuades a private platform to suppress particular users or ideas can effectively extend its own power beyond the limits set in IHRL.

Our workshop seeks to understand how to conceptualize obligations of both states and global digital platforms in the current digital landscape. What are their roles and responsibilities in democracies and non-democracies alike? How should domestic law, international human rights law, and platform terms of service/community guidelines interact in order to protect human rights online? How do extra-legal considerations such as user trust and economic competition shape the answers to these questions?

Moderators
avatar for Eileen Donahoe

Eileen Donahoe

Executive Director, Stanford Global Digital Policy Incubator
Eileen Donahoe is Executive Director of the Global Digital Policy Incubator at Stanford University’s Center for Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law. GDPi is a collaboration hub for public and private sector digital policy innovation that impacts human rights and democr... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Evelyn Mary Aswad

Evelyn Mary Aswad

Director, Int'l Business & Human Rights Center, University of Oklahoma College of Law
Professor Aswad is the Kaiser Chair of International Law and the Director of the Center for International Business & Human Rights (@OULawIBHR) at the University of Oklahoma College of Law. Prior to becoming a law professor, she was the director of the human rights law office at... Read More →
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression and clinical professor of law at the University of California, Irvine, School of Law. 
avatar for Daphne  Keller

Daphne Keller

Director of Intermediary Liability, Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society
Daphne's work at Stanford CIS focuses on legally mandated notice and takedown systems, and how they affect Internet users' rights. She previously worked on the frontlines of this issue as Google's Associate General Counsel for Intermediary Liability. | Her work covers issues ou... Read More →
avatar for Emma Llanso

Emma Llanso

Director, Free Expression Project, Center for Democracy & Technology
avatar for Edward Santow

Edward Santow

Human Rights Commissioner, Australian Human Rights Commission
Edward Santow has been Human Rights Commissioner at the Australian Human Rights Commission since August 2016. | | Ed leads the Commission’s work on detention and implementing the Optional Protocol to the Convention Against Torture (OPCAT); refugees and migration; human rights... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
206D

09:00

Whose story is it anyway? Decoding the Collection & Sharing of Information
While information can lift voices that are often silenced and lead to
decisions that are inclusive, too often the narratives that are told
further marginalize communities and people. Who controls data, how it
is used or ignored, can have significant short and long-term
consequences on the participation and inclusion of various
communities. This panel of human rights and digital communications experts will aim to unpack why it is critical that data be available
and interpreted by those who are most directly affected by its
potential and various implications and how this data can be used to
push for systemic change.

Moderators
avatar for Justin Wiebe

Justin Wiebe

Capacity Building Specialist, Ontario Trillium Foundation
Justin Wiebe is Michif (Métis) from Saskatoon in Treaty 6 and Métis Territory, and currently lives in Toronto in territories covered by the Dish with One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant. Justin is passionate about inclusive city-building that centers reconciliation, youth leadership... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Amira Elghawaby

Amira Elghawaby

Digital Communications, National Representative, Canadian Labour Congress
Amira Elghawaby is an award-winning journalist and human rights advocate. Along with frequent appearances on Canadian and international news networks, Amira has written and produced stories and commentary for CBC Radio, the Ottawa Citizen, the Toronto Star, the Literary Review of... Read More →
avatar for Renu Mandhane

Renu Mandhane

Chief Commissioner, Ontario Human Rights of Ontario
Renu Mandhane was appointed Chief Commissioner of the Ontario Human Rights Commission in October 2015. She is the former Executive Director of the award-winning International Human Rights Program at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law. She has an LL.M in international human... Read More →
avatar for Bianca Wylie

Bianca Wylie

Co-founder, Tech Reset Canada
Co-Founder, Tech Reset Canada & Senior Fellow, CIGI


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
201A

09:00

How to Create for Citizens in Sensitive Digital Space
People living in censored and repressive societies face incredible barriers that limit engagement online. In these environments, citizens are denied venues – publicly and online – where they can express opinions, exchange ideas, and engage freely in discussion about their country’s future. Creating online tools, platforms, and campaigns for people who face barriers to open discussion and access to information present unique challenges that traditional content development and distribution does not solve.

After five years in the field, the Digital Public Square at the University of Toronto has developed a specialized toolkit for creating exciting content and developing innovative platforms to expand access to information and freedom of expression in heavily restricted online spaces. Our projects have received over 50 millions visits from millions of users globally. Most importantly, our measurement and evaluation methodology has enabled us to quantitatively and qualitatively assess project impact.

This session will begin with a brief overview of our projects across the broader Middle East and China, and then immediately begin a structured seminar on our step-by-step development process that generated political accountability platforms, digital documentary filmmaking, online educational games, anonymous AMA tools, and interactive data visualization for online surveys.


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
201B

09:00

Pawah! tech for human rights
This session will present Pawah! a tool to record reliable and auditable proofs of human rights abuses for legal processes, journalistic investigations and public denunciation. This presentation will be composed of two parts.

The first part of the session would be a walkthrough on the development of Pawah!. We plan to explain their objectives and current development after receiving mentorship by Mozilla. We will explain how it was born in Mexico with the help of activists that were victims of police repression and how it is evolving.

Afterwards, there is going to be a panel of experts in the field that will discuss about the functionality of Pawah! and other similar tools to defend human rights and contribute to transitional justice. For this, we will map problems and found during the developing of Pawah! with potential solutions. We will ask the audience to help and give feedback.


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Gisela Pérez de Acha

Gisela Pérez de Acha

Public Policy Officer for Latin America, Derechos Digitales
Gisela Perez de Acha is a Mexican lawyer and activist who specialises in free speech and gender rights within the digital world. She is the public policy officer for Latin America at Derechos Digitales, a non-governmental organisation where she mostly conducts research on algorit... Read More →
avatar for Javier Pallero

Javier Pallero

Policy Analyst, Access Now
Policy Analyst at Access Now focused on Latin America. | I work on: | - Net Neutrality ( including zero rating, OTT regulation) | - Privacy (surveillance, data protection) | - Business and Human Rights - economic concentration | - Freedom of expression (shutdowns, intermediary... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
200B

09:00

How do you teach privacy tools without the word "privacy"?
How do you run digital security trainings with communities that don't have a word for "privacy", or even the same concept? How to work with end users that have very different threat models than you're used to? In this session we’ll address the localization challenges in digital security training and development that often aren't considered in the design process. After breaking off into groups, we’ll work through 3 scenarios, and report back to the group opportunities for working with end users to find solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Jon Camfield

Jon Camfield

Director, Global Technology Programs, Internews
Tools, training, threats, organizational security, SAFETAG.org, usability and our https://usable.tools project, and more!
avatar for Megan DeBlois

Megan DeBlois

Program Manager, Information Security Programs, Internews
Let's talk usability! Currently working with humans around the globe to make security usable for those who need it most! | | Twitter: @realMegDeBlois


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
200A

09:00

Digital Security for Civil Societies in Africa
This session looks at the experience of the trainees after the trainings; we aim at restructuring our trainings and digital security kits for bloggers and civil society to suit their specific needs. The training will also equip the participants with some of the important notes on digital security for both urban and grassroot activists and civil society groups in Africa.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Arsene Tungali

Arsene Tungali

Executive Director, Rudi International
Arsene Tungali has been working and collaborating for the past 5 years on projects related to Internet governance, child online protection, and women’s participation in ICT. He has either conducted or supported research projects, such as the CIPESA’s State of Internet Freedom... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
204B

09:00

Help, We Are Under Attack! - a Peek into the Community of Rapid Responders
This interactive session is facilitated by a group of Rapid Responders that provide time critical support to at-risk organizations and individuals. A fictitious case will be presented in an interactive form to the audience, where the Rapid Responders will show how each and one of them would contribute to supporting the organization at risk.

The session is hosted by representatives from the Digital Defenders Partnership, Front Line Defenders, Media Legal Defence Initiative, VirtualRoad.org, Access Now and Greenhost.

We want the audience to leave the room with a better understanding of the possible facets of emergency support and which actors that currently are available to provide such support. We will provide a holistic view of the emergency response ecosystem (infrastructure, triage, psycho-social, legal, attribution etc.) .

Whether you are an activist, digital security trainer, company representative, funder, government representative, researcher or non-profit employee, this session will provide you with new resources for emergency response and our joint vision in this area.

Moderators
MK

Marie Kummerlowe

Project Officer, Hivos
Marie Kummerlowe is Project Officer for the Digital Defenders Partnership Program.

Speakers
GC

Gillo Cutrupi

Digital Integrity Fellow, Digital Defenders Partnership
avatar for Ester Eriksson

Ester Eriksson

Operations Manager, Qurium/Virtualroad.org
I am a founding member of Qurium Media Foundation, and has spent the last decade to develop Virtualroad.org to what it has become today. | Qurium is a Security Solutions provider to at-risk organizations and individuals in the field of independent journalism and human rights... Read More →
avatar for Hapee de Groot

Hapee de Groot

Rapid Response, Greenhost
open source, rapid response, websites under attack, development of people and software, ict4d, drupal, linux, ubuntu, geek, opendata, security & greenhost
PH

Padraig Hughes

Legal Director, Media Legal Defence Initiative
PZ

Pablo Zavala

Program Coordinator, Front Line Defenders
I have worked in Digital Protection and other issues related to Human Rights and technology with activist and defenders for more than 17 years now. I am currently and only for 6 months, managing the Digital Protection Program for Front Line Defenders after which I will continue t... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
206A

09:00

Digital literacy for all: how can libraries help?
In this co-led workshop (IFLA/Brookfield Institution) we want to highlight the important role libraries have in helping users to access and apply the information they need for personal and community development. In the IFLA segment of the workshop, we want to share examples of what libraries are doing in the field of digital literacy from a global (Donna) and local (Pam) perspective but also encourage participants to suggest ways libraries and other stakeholders could collaborate to further digital literacy at a global scale. We want to change the way people think and use libraries! The Brookfield Institute’s segment will focus on digital literacy training., This facilitated workshop invites participants to co-develop solutions for addressing identified gaps in the digital literacy education and training landscape in Canada, including demographic, geographic, sectoral, skill-based gaps. Through facilitated exercises and small group discussions, workshop participants will explore why the gaps exist and develop policy and program proposals to support more inclusive and accessible pathways to digital literacy. The session will draw on the Brookfield Institute's expertise in designing and facilitating multi-sectoral sessions on complex issues using design thinking methods and other hands-on exercises

Moderators
avatar for Simona Ramkisson

Simona Ramkisson

Senior Project Officer, Brookfield Institute for Innovation+Entrepreneurship

Speakers
avatar for Eric Craven

Eric Craven

Community Development Librarian, Atwater Library and Computer Centre
Eric Craven is the Community Development Librarian at the Atwater Library and Computer Centre in Montreal, where he also did his graduate studies in Information Science at McGill University. Eric’s work focuses specifically on using digital media to disrupt normative expectatio... Read More →
avatar for Pam Ryan

Pam Ryan

Director, Service Development & Innovation, Toronto Public Library
avatar for Donna Scheeder

Donna Scheeder

Past President, IFLA
Ms. Donna Scheeder was President , 2015-2017of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA), the global voice of libraries. She has held a number of increasingly responsible positions at the Library of Congress including Director of Law Library Ser... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
204C

09:00

Lightning Talks: Representation, Inspiration, and Community Building
How open data can revolutionize supply chains (The WikiRate Project)

Speakers: 
Laureen van Breen

This session will present some initial results from the ChainReact project (http://chainreact.org), an EC funded initiative that maps corporate networks to increase corporate transparency and responsiveness. It will demonstrate how advocacy, open data, and the integration of existing technologies, is making it possible to put brand level data in the hands of supply chain workers, ultimately enabling them to improve their own working conditions.

The Next Wave: Civil Society meets the Outcome Economy
(University of Cambridge)

Speakers: Jonathan Penn

In 2015, the World Economic Forum forecast that the convergence of various emerging technologies such as the Internet of Things and Artificial Intelligence will enable the so-called Outcome Economy in which outcomes are sold in place of products. To give a brief example, today you can buy "vertical transportation" from Mitsubishi rather than buying an elevator. This means that installation, maintenance, etc. are handled by Mitsubishi for a monthly fee; rather than buy an elevator, you've bought the intended outcome, which frees Mitsubishi to alter its supply chain. To offer another example, Rolls Royce now sells a TotalCare Package that replaces the sale of an airline engine. Rather than buy a physical artifact--the engine--you receive the desired outcome: use of an engine with a up-time guaranteed by Rolls Royce. What does the Outcome Economy mean for the future of Civil Society? With reference to my current research as a Google Technology Policy Fellow at the European Youth Forum, I will propose what this shift could mean for civil society and activism in the years to come. I also open the floor to comments.

#WeAre52pc: A Movement for the Representation of Kenyan Women 
(#WeAre52Pc)

Speakers: Brenda Wambui

This is the story of the #WeAre52pc movement, which advocates for the realization of Kenya's constitutional requirement that no more than two thirds of public positions should be held by one gender. I will take you on a journey through this groundbreaking movement, sharing why we believe it is important for women to be equitably represented in Kenya, the tactics we are using and the challenges we have faced when advocating for our cause, the effects of women's under-representation both online and offline, and the future we envision for women in Kenya.

Building Global Community through Technology-Enabled and Facilitated Dialogue (Soliya)

Speakers: Waidehi Gokhale

This lightning talk is about virtual exchange, an educational innovation that uses technology to connect youth in face-to-face dialogue across countries and cultures, with the goal of building intercultural understanding, empathy, and global community. Participants learn about the key aspects of virtual exchange, including the use of trained facilitators to ensure meaningful and honest interaction across differences.

The talk also includes a quick demonstration of Soliya’s video conferencing platform. Central to our platform are our roundtable format wherein participants’ video screens are arranged in a circle and our application of the talking stick method whereby only one participant can speak at a time. All dialogue is in real-time and face-to-face, with audio optimized so that all participants, regardless of their technology or internet strength, can be heard clearly. Our platform is closed and secure with SSL encryption and adherence to IT industry security standards, making it a safe and confidential space for dialogue. The intention in sharing our platform is to introduce a fresh perspective on how technology can promote inclusion and diversity of voices in global civic society.

Inspiring new readers: empowering Wikipedia users to improve access to knowledge through design research 
(Wikimedia Foundation) 

Speakers: 
Kacie Harold

The objective of this session is to show the need of in-the-field, user oriented research (qualitative and quantitative) to design programs, steer discussions, and foster opportunities that aim to increase access for more people, particularly unconnected populations. In 2016, the Wikimedia Foundation undertook a research project to better understand how people in countries where Wikimedia isn't well known approach learning, knowledge, and the Internet. This user-focused design research that was conducted in partnership with local communities has been a powerful tool to design programs that address barriers to access, both at the platform and user level. The research, which has identified awareness and affordability as primary obstacles for users in emerging countries to access Wikipedia, not only gives a valuable perspective on the context to design the pertinent policy and technical solutions, but allows communities themselves to design and implement real solutions, once empowered by other stakeholders.

As an example, after design research by the Wikimedia Foundation in emerging countries, an "Inspire campaign" program has been implemented, empowering local communities in emerging countries to come out with innovative ideas to promote awareness of the existence and value of Wikipedia, the internet, and access to information. The program awards grants to Wikipedia community members to implement their own solutions to address low awareness of Wikipedia and free knowledge resources.

The lightning talk will showcase how all stakeholders can benefit when platforms conduct user research to identify obstacles facing users at a global level, and use that research to implement technological and policy initiatives and empower users to design programs and interventions that reduce barriers to access based on their local contexts.


Speakers
avatar for Laureen van Breen

Laureen van Breen

Program Manager, WikiRate
WikiRate is a collaborative research platform that focuses on the collection, analysis, and discussion of corporation ESG data. Working together with many different stakeholders the aim is to make information about the social and environmental performance of companies accessible... Read More →
avatar for Jonathan Penn

Jonathan Penn

University of Cambridge
Doctoral researcher studying the history and philosophy of artificial intelligence at the University of Cambridge. | | Google Technology Policy Fellow at the European Youth Forum working on the impact of artificial intelligence on life for young people in Europe. Former fellow... Read More →
BW

Brenda Wambui

Host & Executive Producer, Otherwise? Podcast


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
205A

09:00

Women’s voices cocreate the Internet

Women represent approximately half of the world's population. However, many cannot even imagine that they could benefit from ICT for their own development and empowerment because access to digital technologies and their fundamental rights are denied for socio-economic, socio-political and/or socio-cultural reasons. In addition, women are 50% less likely than men to access the Internet, and 30-50% less likely to use it for personal empowerment (Web Foundation, 2015). And although the barriers to this are varied, we must note that the top 3 are quite telling: lack of knowledge, high costs and little relevant content

Given this scenario, in this session we want to put faces to these statistics in order to show some efforts that seek to empower women from underserved and discriminated communities and change these figures. On the one hand, we will screen a 15-min documentary made by a group of women from a slum in Bogotá, who, at the same time that were trained in techno-policy, talk about their lives, their hopes and the desire to empower themselves and build collective dreams. This will be follow by a conversation that will present the experiences within the project. On the other, we will share the experiences and learned lessons of a digital literacy project for indigenous women in Mexico and how the digital divide becomes a double exclusion element in their social, political and community contexts.

We want to promote this dialogue because we believe that the ideal Internet is where women can create, innovate, exchange ideas, express their sexuality, become a source of information, run their own businesses and participate on equal terms with our male counterparts.


Speakers
avatar for Amalia Toledo

Amalia Toledo

Project Coordinator, Fundación Karisma


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
204A

09:00

Tightening the Net: The case of Internet Controls in Iran
We want to discuss the most pressing concerns that inhibit the free use of the Internet in Iran, whether coming from the Iranian government (i.e. projects like National Information Network; arrests of Internet users; etc.) or from other actors such as the foreign technology companies (i.e. Apple), or the US government (OFAC sanctions). Using the expertise of the ARTICLE19 team, we will discuss our findings and advocacy from the past year's work with "Tightening the Net", and discuss ways forward to affect change both from the Iranian government and from international forums (i.e. UN mechanisms such as ITU; work with the UN special rapporteur). This discussion will endeavour to encapsulate the wider challenges for digital rights in the MENA region and beyond.

Moderators
avatar for Mahsa Alimardani

Mahsa Alimardani

Internet Researcher, ARTICLE19/OXFORD INTERNET INSTITUTE
Mahsa Alimardani is a Iranian-Canadian Internet researcher. She currently helps lead some of the digital rights programs on Iran with ARTICLE19 and is a doctoral student at the Oxford Internet Institute, studying the politics of platforms in Iran.

Speakers
avatar for Simin Kargar

Simin Kargar

Human Rights Lawyer, Berkman Klein Center
Simin Kargar is a human rights lawyer with a focus on the interrelations of technology and human rights. She studies harmful speech online, gender-based violence and technology, and the interplays of social media, power and new propaganda. In addition, Simin investigates how disc... Read More →
KM

Keith McManamen

Strategic Analyst, Psiphon


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
202B

09:00

Making Safe Online Access to Affordable Medication Real: Addressing the UN Human Rights resolution for access to essential medicines
During RightsCon 2017 the Brussels Principles on Medication Sales Over the Internet were created during a workshop, titled Online Access to Affordable Medication: Applying Human Rights Law to Cyber Rule-Making and Internet Governance. The Brussels Principles address safe and affordable purchase of medications using the Internet. While these principles have been socialized over the past year, bringing them back to RightsCon for further engagement, collaboration and development is appropriate given the global benefit of such principles if adopted and implemented.

At RightsCon 2018, expert panelists on digital rights, human rights, consumer rights, jurisdiction and Internet distance care – along with those in attendance at our session – will bring ideas and recommendations to refine and improve upon the 2017 Brussels Principles. The output from this session will move the principles one step closer to becoming the global standard that make delivery of safe, affordable medications using the Internet a reality.

Moderators
RA

Ron Andruff

As President of ONR Consulting, Ron brings more than 30 years of international marketing experience and 20 years of Internet policy development at ICANN, offering essential insight and crucial strategic advice to businesses watching and wondering how the development of the Intern... Read More →

Speakers
AI

Aria Ilyad Ahmad

Aria is a policy advisor at the Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research at York University. Since 2014, he has also served as a consultant to the World Health Organization's Department of Essential Medicines and Health Products. Aria is a past Duke University Global Health... Read More →
RA

Ron Andruff

As President of ONR Consulting, Ron brings more than 30 years of international marketing experience and 20 years of Internet policy development at ICANN, offering essential insight and crucial strategic advice to businesses watching and wondering how the development of the Intern... Read More →
TC

Tracy Cooley

Tracy Cooley has more than 20 years of experience working on behalf of patients by leading numerous national campaigns focused on raising awareness for key policy issues, expediting the development of cures and treatments, and promoting education resources and support to improve... Read More →
avatar for Robert Guerra

Robert Guerra

CEO, Privaterra
Robert is a Spanish and Canadian national that has over 15 years of experience developing solutions related to Internet governance, human rights, digital security and Internet freedom. Robert is the founder of Privaterra, a Toronto-based company that works with private industry a... Read More →
JC

Jillian Clare Kohler

| Jillian Clare Kohler, PhD is a Professor at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, the Dalla Lana School of Public Health and the Munk School of Global Affairs. She is also Director of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Governance, Transparency and Accountability in the Pharmaceuti... Read More →
avatar for Gabriel Levitt

Gabriel Levitt

President and Co-founder, PharmacyChecker.com
Mr. Levitt provides strategic direction and manages business operations, development, and research. He is a public advocate for prescription drug affordability in America, Internet freedom, and the United Nations. He has testified before Congress on issues relating to access to a... Read More →
SP

Shivam Patel

Dr. Shivam Patel is the Director of Pharmacy Verification and Information st Pharmacychecker.com. Shivam provides expert knowledge regarding safe pharmacy practice, quality assurance, drug safety, and patient access to affordable medication. He is a registered pharmacist in Massa... Read More →
TS

Tim Smith

General Manager, CIPA
Tim has over 40 years of experience in public relations, government relations and marketing, and has worked as a senior manager at a number of leading media companies in Canada.  He joined the Canadian International Pharmacy Association (CIPA) in 2009 where he provides strategic... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
201C

09:00

How Scientology and Porn Shaped the Internet
What do Tom Cruise and Kim Kardashian have in common? They have both sued for copyright infringement. Who would have thought a religion and porn would have added so much to the American jurisprudence? And who is open to talking about it in an in-depth and academic way? We are. Next time you watch porn or read Dianetics, make sure to thank the actors and religiously-devoted for shaping the modern internet! Our Founding Fathers never saw this coming when they wrote the Progress Clause.


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
203A

09:00

Leveraging Technology to Address Misinformation

Join us for a discussion about leveraging digital innovation to combat disinformation, including computational propaganda.   

The use of disinformation by malicious actors to interfere in the democratic processes has become a center-stage issue for policy makers and other stake-holders around the world. Serious  reflection about effectively addressing and countering this complex problem is underway and requires input from the full spectrum of stakeholders.  

A key question on everyone's mind is how can we prevent and counter such nefarious activities, while at the same time protecting and promoting human rights, with freedom of expression and other civil and political rights at the forefront?  And while regulation and sanctions loom large, it is an opportune moment to examine how innovation, including digital tools, apps, AI and block chain can be leveraged to protect civil society and democracy.  


Moderators
TD

Tara Denham

Director, Democracy Unit, Office of Human Rights, Freedoms and Inclusion, Global Affairs Canada, Government of Canada

Speakers
avatar for Samantha Bradshaw

Samantha Bradshaw

Oxford Internet Institute
Samantha Bradshaw is a DPhil. candidate at the Oxford Internet Institute, a Researcher on the Computational Propaganda Project, and a Senior Fellow at the Canadian International Council. Prior to moving to Oxford, Samantha worked at the Centre for International Governance Innovat... Read More →
avatar for Lex Gill

Lex Gill

Citizen Lab
avatar for Mallory Knodel

Mallory Knodel

Head of Digital, ARTICLE 19
avatar for Johnson Liang

Johnson Liang

Participant, g0v.tw
I am... | | - A web developer that works at an Internet company as a day job. | | - An open-sourced civic tech supporter, participated & founded several projects that facilitates civic participation of democracy. | | - Going to present Cofacts, the voluntary project I have fou... Read More →



Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
205B

09:00

Trading Up: What Net Neutrality Means for Small Businesses and Trade
Net neutrality is a hot button topic in the global internet freedom and access space. Proponents of net neutrality argue that it is vital for promoting innovation and economic growth. A less commonly discussed aspect of the net neutrality debate, however, is how net neutrality protections, or a lack thereof, impact small and minority-owned businesses such as e-commerce companies. This session aims to provide audience members with the opportunity to learn about net neutrality through a human-centered and international trade lens, two perspectives not conventionally discussed, especially in tandem. Each panelist will speak about how their respective nations or regions have engaged with the net neutrality debate and what ramifications these decisions have had for small businesses, trade, and social and economic
growth.  

Moderators
avatar for Eric Null

Eric Null

Policy Counsel, New America's Open Technology Institute

Speakers
avatar for Mark Buell

Mark Buell

Regional Bureau Director, North America, Internet Society
avatar for Amba Kak

Amba Kak

Tech policy fellow, Mozilla
avatar for Ryan Singel

Ryan Singel

Fellow, Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society
Working on net neutrality at Stanford and founder of Contextly. Interested in privacy, security and media.
avatar for Dhanaraj Thakur

Dhanaraj Thakur

Senior Research Manager, Alliance for Affordable Internet / Web Foundation


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
200C

09:00

Will the Right to be Forgotten come to Canada?
What is the future of the "right to be forgotten"? Is the answer to be found here, in Canada? With its own modern Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Canada is neither European nor American. Its laws reflect both civil and common law traditions. How Canada addresses the "right to be forgotten", therefore, will have influence and ramifications around the world. Hear from experts on the topic - from Canada and around the world?

Moderators
avatar for Paul Schabas

Paul Schabas

Partner, Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLP
Toronto based media lawyer - libel, privacy, censorship, copyright, intermediary liability, jurisdiction, human rights. Litigation partner at Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLP. I regularly act for Canada’s major media free expression matters and have been counsel on many leading m... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for María Paz Canales

María Paz Canales

Executive Director, Derechos Digitales
avatar for Christian Leblanc

Christian Leblanc

Intellectual Property and Media lawyer, Fasken Martineau DuMoulin
Christian Leblanc practices in Intellectual Property, with a particular emphasis on pharmaceutical patent cases. He also practices in media law, communications and defamation.  | | He has an extensive knowledge of the pharmaceutical industry, including regulatory aspects, marke... Read More →
avatar for Mark Stephens

Mark Stephens

Partner: Head of Media Law and Regulatory, Howard Kennedy
avatar for Daniel Therrien

Daniel Therrien

Privacy Commissioner of Canada


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
206C

09:00

Data Driven Decency: New, Collaborative Experiments to Diminish Online Hate and Harassment Online
In this session we'll report on - and brainstorm new possibilities for - experiments on methods to diminish harassment and hate speech online. Some participants will describe how they brought about the first experiment to be conducted by academic researchers working with an Internet platform that committed in advance to sharing data and allowing publication in a peer-reviewed journal. To ensure that the experiment met academic ethical standards, it was approved by two IRBs.

Participants will be asked to offer best practices and ideas learned from their own experiences or observations regarding collaborative research to diminish hatred, harassment, and violent extremism online. Next, there will be a lightning round of Q&A to clarify, and add details. Finally, in a final provocation/invitation to the whole group, the moderator will ask for ideas to push forward experiments on diminishing hate speech, harassment, and violent extremism online. Afterward we will circulate the ideas generated, and invite collaboration to implement them.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Christopher Bavitz

Christopher Bavitz

Clinical Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
avatar for Susan Benesch

Susan Benesch

Executive Director, Dangerous Speech Project
avatar for Camille Francois

Camille Francois

Affiliate, Harvard Berkman-Klein Center for Internet & Society
Camille Francois is an Affiliate, Harvard Berkman-Klein Center for Internet & Society and Cybersecurity Fellow, New America Foundation. Previously, she was a Principal Researcher at Jigsaw, a think tank and technology incubator within Google / Alphabet, where she led an interdisc... Read More →
avatar for Jon Penney

Jon Penney

Assistant Professor / Research Fellow, Schulich Law, Dalhousie University / Citizen Lab / Princeton CITP /
Jon Penney is a legal academic and social scientist. He is presently a Research Fellow at the Citizen Lab located at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, a Research Affiliate of Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy, and teaches law as an As... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
205C

09:00

Civil Society Under Assault Online: Threats, Opportunities, and Stories From Across the Regions
Activists from Sri Lanka, Ukraine, Venezuela, and Zimbabwe share compelling stories of their work to advance an internet that respects fundamental rights, and is an inclusive, participatory democratic space. In Sri Lanka, our partner reflects on an extensive research project underway documenting how gender based violence (GBV) in a historically patriarchal society plays itself out both on and offline, and what this means for advancing gender equality and safety online. In Ukraine, a "hybrid war" war with Russia (both cyber and traditional arms) has raised serious concerns about what types of content should be blocked as "anti-Ukrainian" and when do these policies begin to infringe on legitimate political speech?

In Venezuela, the government has steadily eroded online freedom, closing off space for independent journalism, and has engaged in deliberate network disruptions seriously jeopardizing rights to internet access. Our partner shares findings from ongoing national network measurements and how access and speed are being used to stifle fundamental rights. In Zimbabwe, we review how a proposed Omnibus Cyberbill may threaten fundamental rights in a year where a presidential election is set to occur amidst a legacy of internet shutdowns and harassment of activists.

We hope these stories generate a conversation among the audience to include other countries and creative approaches to activism under similar circumstances.

Moderators
avatar for Dominic Bellone

Dominic Bellone

Sr. Program Officer, internet governance & freedom, Counterpart International
Manage a portfolio of civil society partnerships advancing a rights based approach to internet governance. Formerly with Freedom House, International Republican Institute, Institute for War & Peace Reporting, & MSNBC, a cable news concern.

Speakers

Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 10:15
203B

09:00

Access Now Digital Security Clinic

The Digital Security Clinic is run by the staff of Access Now’s Digital Security Helpline, a free-of-charge resource for civil society around the world. We offer real-time, direct technical assistance and advice to activists, independent media, and civil society organizations. You can find out more about the Helpline at https://www.accessnow.org/help  

The Helpline will be holding open drop-in hours in the Access Now Lounge on the second floor from 1:30pm to 5pm on Wednesday and Friday, and from 9am to 1:30pm on Thursday. You can also arrange for a one-on-one appointment with a Helpline staff member throughout the conference by emailing help@accessnow.org.

The staff identify problems and help attendees implement practices that can protect them from threats. During an average visit, Clinic technologists:

1// Assess risks and needs

2// Analyze current practices

3// Troubleshoot problems

4// Provide tools and training to address emergent issues

5// Initiate cases with Access Now’s Digital Security Helpline for any issues not resolved on the spot

6// Refer to specialists where the Helpline is unable to assist

 


Thursday May 17, 2018 09:00 - 13:30
Access Now Lounge
  • Host Organization Access Now

10:00

Antitrust is back! But is it the silver bullet?
After decades of relative obscurity, antitrust is back in the headlines. In the European Union, the European Commission is actively pursuing antitrust cases against digital platforms. In the United States, the Department of Justice is assessing media ownership takeovers. In Brazil the antitrust authority is dealing with issues like zero-rating, net neutrality and vertical integration (paid TV and Internet).
People are increasingly worried about market concentration and power distribution in the Internet. And antitrust seems like the natural answer to all these concerns. But is it? What are the limits of antitrust advocacy considering the lack of expertise in this field inside the digital rights community?
In this panel, we will bring the visions of recognized antitrust experts of Brazil and the United States developing a north-south approach to antitrust policy and enforcement.
The substantive experts leading the conversation are Vinicius Marques de Carvalho, Former President of CADE, the Brazilian Antitrust Authority, and Professor of Commercial Law at the University of São Paulo; and Gene Kimmelman, President and CEO of Public Knowledge and the Former Chief Counsel for Competition Policy at the US Department of Justice. Rafael Zanatta from IDEC (Brazil) and Veridiana Alimonti from Intervozes (Brazil) will bring the civil society perspective. Marcela Mattiuzzo, former member of CADE and researcher at the University of São Paulo, will join the conversation. Gus Rossi, from Public Knowledge, will moderate the conversation.

Moderators
avatar for Gus Rossi

Gus Rossi

Global Policy Director, Public Knowledge
At Public Knowledge I focus on global issues, promoting an open internet, and balanced intellectual property policies around the world. | | Prior to joining Public Knowledge, I worked for Argentina at the Board of the Inter-American Development Bank and helped a Member of the Eu... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Marcela Mattiuzzo

Marcela Mattiuzzo

Partner, VMCA
Digital rights and antitrust lawyer. Former chief of staff at the office of the president at the Brazilian antitrust authority.
avatar for Rafael Zanatta

Rafael Zanatta

Policy Analyst, Idec
Brazilian lawyer and policy analyst at the Brazilian Institute of Consumer Defense in Brazil (Idec). I hold a Master of Science at the University of São Paulo Faculty of Law and a Master of Law and Political Economy at the University of Turin (Italy). | I'm part of the Working G... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:00 - 10:25
Village Main Stage

10:30

Hacia una CUIDAdanía Digital
Esta propuesta busca hablar de la dimensión digital de nuestro cuerpo, partiendo de que existe la dimensión corporal, espiritual/emocional y territorial de éste. Conforme nuestro trabajo y vida crece, construye y ocupa espacios en el mundo en línea, nuestro cuerpo digital crece muchas veces sin un sentido de cuidado y colectividad inmediato. Esta propuesta, busca explorar en el concepto de CUIDAdanía en su dimensión digital, busca la contrucción colectiva (¿o no?) de dicho concepto ético y político feminista, apostando a un cuidado de sí y colectivo en ese mundo en línea, colocando el cuidado en el centro como parte de la apuesta por la vida y la construcción de sociedades del cuidado. No podemos separar los espacios en línea de los espacios fuera de ella, particularmente como personas defensoras de los derechos humanos. Articulamos gran parte de nuestro trabajo en el mundo online, en donde nuestras vidas y cuerpos digitales también enfrentan violencia de sus otras dimensiones, pero en donde también se establecen redes sociales y afectivas con espacios seguros y de protección desde la corresponsabilidad. Este será un espacio abierto, porque otro activismo online es posible.


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 10:55
Village Main Stage

10:30

Data Rights Policy: Do AI Ethics, Privacy and Open Data Activists need each other to succeed?
Through a panel discussion and audience engagement, our goal is to bring together three communities (AI Ethics, Open Data, Privacy) that are closely linked but not yet in close collaboration, to explore: 1) what these communities might share in common, 2) where it may not be possible to find compromises, and 3) how to identify 'landing zones' for collaboration across these fields. We will identify several case studies that will help highlight the key threats and opportunities for our communities.The overall objective is to lay the groundwork for a possible joint agenda for campaigning, policy change, and collaborations on Data Rights / Data Ethics.


Moderators
avatar for Laura Bacon

Laura Bacon

Principal, Policy (Governance & Citizen Engagement), Omidyar Network
As a principal of investments at Omidyar Network, Laura focuses on the policy and advocacy strategy for the global Governance & Citizen Engagement initiative. Laura brings experience in international development as well as research on public sector leadership and government accou... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Tim Davies

Tim Davies

Member, Open Data Services Co-operative
avatar for Frederike Kaltheuner

Frederike Kaltheuner

Data Exploitation Lead, Policy Officer, Privacy International
Hi! I work for Privacy International in London where I'm leading our work on data exploitation. We're a team of technologists, policy experts, lawyers and investigators advocating for strong regional, national and international laws that protect privacy. We work on policing tech... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
206C

10:30

Trickle-Down Progress: Messaging Traps in Strategic Campaigning
This roundtable will ask participants to reflect on why digital rights campaigns often use certain messaging frames more frequently than others in public and political communications, and if there are broader values sacrificed when we do that. For example, is consistently tapping into nationalism, or capitalist notions of "innovation", ultimately more harmful to broader societal progress, or a necessary trade-off to achieve tangible change within digital rights? If it is necessary, how can we mitigate potential collateral damage or hold ourselves accountable to other human rights movements? The intended outcomes of this session are: potential alternatives and more intersectional campaign design, clear-eyed acknowledgement if/where there are no alternatives, and accountability strategies. Speakers will include leading digital rights advocates from Bits of Freedom, Derechos Digitales, Free Press, the National Hispanic Media Coalition, Net Blocks, OpenMedia, Public Citizen, Prostasia, Research ICT Africa, and Turkey Blocks. Please Note: To support honest, reflective, and meaningful discussion among participants, this session will be subject to Chatham House Rules. Participants are welcome to follow along and contribute during the session in our collaborative note-taking document, at tinyurl.com/trickledownprogress.

Moderators
avatar for Cynthia Khoo

Cynthia Khoo

Lawyer / LL.M. Candidate, Tekhnos Law / University of Ottawa
Cynthia Khoo is a digital rights lawyer and founder of Tekhnos Law. She represents and advises clients on issues such as net neutrality, freedom of expression, copyright, privacy, Internet regulation, intermediary liability, and digital trade. In September 2018, Cynthia will begi... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Coustick-Deal

Ruth Coustick-Deal

Co-host, The Intersection of Things
avatar for Isik Mater

Isik Mater

Director of Research, TurkeyBlocks
Isik Mater is president of the Alternative Informatics Association and Research Director at media freedom watchdog Turkey Blocks. She is a digital activist and commentator on internet censorship, cyber-security and information warfare. Isik contributes to Turkish press agency Bia... Read More →
avatar for Carmen Scurato

Carmen Scurato

Vice President, Policy & General Counsel, National Hispanic Media Coalition
Carmen Scurato leads the National Hispanic Media Coalition’s policy and government affairs office in Washington, D.C. and is responsible for developing policy and legal strategies that encourage open and affordable communications, innovation, competition, and diversity. Carmen... Read More →
avatar for Alp Toker

Alp Toker

Director of Technology, TVHI Media Lab - TurkeyBlocks
Alp is founder of the netblocks.org digital rights initiative and award-winning Turkey Blocks collective, and Sakharov Fellow for Freedom of Thought with the European Parliament. He works on freedom of expression online, digital transparency and policy tooling for internet govern... Read More →
avatar for Matt Wood

Matt Wood

Policy Director, Free Press
Matt leads the Free Press policy and legal team's efforts to protect the open internet, prevent media concentration, and promote affordable broadband deployment.


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
201B

10:30

Changes and Challenges, scary but necessary". Facing challenges in Digital Security Training models and how change could become a fantastic tool to achieve creative solutions
A meeting for digital security trainers and digital defenders to discuss their latest challenges. We will share experiences and advices to those interested to embark in this journey and also want to learn from you. What worked and what didn'tt? What kind of challenges have we faced and how we got out of them? How do we manage to survive and develop creative solutions in a context that is fast-changing? All people leading trainings, direct assistance (to individuals and organizations) and methodology development on digital security present at RightsCon are welcome to join. Participants will introduce themselves and the area they work in and share their experience and challenges. We will discuss the challenges they face, lessons learned they would like to share, changes they implemented, training best practices and also bad training experiences / failures.

Speakers
TL

Tanya Lockwood

Executive Director, Fundación Acceso
avatar for Bahaa Nasr

Bahaa Nasr

Information Security Manager, ISC Project


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
201A

10:30

Internet Freedom in Central-Eastern Europe and Eurasia: Access Denied or Revived?
Internet freedom is not just about Internet in US, Canada, UK or EU. It’s about our Internet, irrespective of whether we live in Kyrgyzstan or Romania. Noteworthy, the problems are not that different. But the solutions or even non-solutions are sometimes surprising. During this session, we want to highlight that in some places Internet freedom is not something you have by default, but rather the value and right you have to continuously struggle and advocate for. 

The session is prepared by the Internet Freedom Network (IFN), uniting so far 10 civil society organizations (CSOs) from Central-Eastern Europe (CEE) and Eurasia. The discussion will be built around the successes and challenges of fostering Internet freedom and a broader range of human rights online in our regions. We will also provide an overview of some of the in-country Internet freedom experiences (Macedonia, Romania, Ukraine, and Kyrgyzstan) implemented by CSOs at the national level. Final part of the session will be dedicated to open discussion with the audience, hopefully from very different regions, which may open up new opportunities for cooperation.

We, as the IFN, strongly believe that just as Internet transcends borders, same should be freedom – inclusive and available to each and every person on the globe. The CEE and Eurasia regions historically tend to share same challenges and threats to Internet freedom. Restrictive and defensive practices are becoming a norm for the governments who lag behind the technological development in terms of normative regulation capacity but are willing to preserve control over online environment. Both lack of regulation and excessive regulation might hinder Internet freedom and deprive individuals of the possibility to enjoy their rights in technologically advanced and developing societies.

During this session we want to share our experiences united around common set of values and principles, such as rule of law, free speech, privacy, equality and accountability, but with varied methods of advocacy in our respective countries that are highly contextualized. The presented methods would ideally be helpful for activists from small and medium-sized countries.

Moderators
OK

Olga Kyryliuk

CEO & Founder, The Influencer Platform

Speakers
avatar for Bardhyl Jashari

Bardhyl Jashari

Director, Metamorphosis Foundation
AK

Alexey Kozliuk

Cofounder, Human Constanta
avatar for Bogdan Manolea

Bogdan Manolea

Executive Director, NGO “Association for Technology and Internet”


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
200B

10:30

Levelling the Playing Field: Partisan Political Expression in a Digital World

The profound changes wrought by the digital communications revolution are posing an increasingly serious threat to free and fair elections. A central challenge is how to regulate politically partisan speech in the new environment in a way that promotes a level electoral playing field and yet respects freedom of expression. Traditional systems – campaign finance regimes, rules on balance and impartiality in the broadcast media and bans on foreign interference – are either easy to get around or increasingly less relevant. In addition, the dominant online platforms wield enormous powers over speech that could potentially be used to influence elections.

This session will explore these challenges, the impact they are having on free elections and what options there are for technical and/or legal/regulatory solutions that are effective and yet respect international standards on freedom of expression. This panel will be a rare chance for experts from different regions and disciplines to provide critical perspectives on these challenges and put forward new and innovative possible solutions.


Moderators
avatar for Toby Mendel

Toby Mendel

Executive Director, Centre for Law and Democracy
I have been a freedom of expression/right to information lawyer and activist for over 20 years with a lot of experience working at the international level and in countries in regions around the world. Perhaps my most important area of expertise is in terms of standard-setting whe... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Agnes Callamard

Agnes Callamard

Director, Columbia Global Freedom of Expression, Columbia University
Dr. Agnès Callamard is the Director of Columbia University Global Freedom of Expression, an initiative seeking to advance understanding on freedom of expression global norms, and Special Adviser to the President of Columbia University, first amendment scholar Lee Bollinger. | On... Read More →
avatar for Agustina Del Campo

Agustina Del Campo

Director, CELE UP
Agustina Del Campo directs the Center for Studies on Freedom of Expression and Access to Information at Palermo University in Buenos Aires. She is a lawyer and LLM with a specialization in International Human Rights Law. She is a member of the GNI and the group of Experts at Co... Read More →
avatar for Portia Karegeya

Portia Karegeya

Legal Officer, Centre for Law and Democracy
avatar for David Kaye

David Kaye

UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression and clinical professor of law at the University of California, Irvine, School of Law. 


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
203B

10:30

Principles into Practice: Crowdsourcing Advocacy Strategies to Promote Digital Rights
Over the last year the National Democratic Institute (NDI) has been collaborating with the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE), and the Center for International Media Assistance (CIMA), as well as collecting input from over 50 global democracy-focused organizations to develop the Democratic Principles for an Open Internet (http://openinternet.global). The Principles outline nine separate areas critical for an open and democratic internet, and contextualizes them through on-the-ground examples, warning signs to look for, and links to related international frameworks and standards.

Documents on their own do nothing. Now that the Principles have been published, how can they - as well as other sets of norms and standards related to internet freedom - realistically assist activists and advocates to push against forces at the local or international level who threaten an open internet? How can we make such norms and standards documents and approaches accessible to those new to the digital rights space? Is their use and promotion actually an effective way to create policy-level change in the internet freedom space?

This conversation session will briefly introduce the Democratic Principles to participants, identify and discuss ways in which such frameworks can be practically applied on the ground, and invite others to share their own experiences with operationalizing or using international norms and standards for advocacy.

Moderators
avatar for Daniel O'Maley

Daniel O'Maley

Associate Editor, Center for Intl Media Assistance
I'm the Associate Editor at the Center for International Media Assistance. My portfolio includes Internet policy and tech innovation. Anyone interested in publishing reports on these topics in terms of how they relate to media should get in touch with me.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Moulton

Sarah Moulton

Senior Technology Innovation Analyst, National Democratic Institute
avatar for Maiko Nakagaki

Maiko Nakagaki

CIPE
I'm an open internet advocate interested in the intersection of tech, the private sector, and democracy. If you're working on issues of open internet, tech for dem, digital economy, let's talk! More info about our work: https://openinternet.global/


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
206A

10:30

Social Media Takedowns: Protecting Who?
In June 2017, Google announced four steps intended to fight terrorism online - including more serious detection and faster removal of content related to violent extremism. The human rights activist organization Syrian Archive lost 400,000 videos overnight. In September 2017, Facebook  sanctioned Rohingya activists for posting videos depicting the ethnic cleansing of Rohingya villages in Myanmar for violating their terms of service, which ban graphic videos. Twitter has long succumbed to requests from the Turkish government to take down tweets criticizing the state. While these takedowns are currently retrievable when the human rights community knows they have happened and can react to them, what happens when the efficiency of the removal system means the human rights community does not even know the content existed before it disappears? In this panel, experts in using social media and open source information for human rights investigations will discuss what can be done about this situation. It will ask who the takedowns are protecting and why, the problems around trusting publicly listed corporations with stories opression, the challenges for activist groups who need to let the world know about the abuses they're suffering, the ramifications for such takedowns and, Crucially, what solutions may be possible to balance out the pressure on social media networks to comply with local legislation with the need for survivors to share stories of human rights abuses.

Moderators
avatar for Christoph Koettl

Christoph Koettl

New York Times

Speakers
avatar for Anna Veronica Banchik

Anna Veronica Banchik

PhD Candidate, University of Texas - Austin
Anna Banchik is a PhD Candidate in Sociology at the University of Texas at Austin with interdisciplinary interests at the intersection of science and technology studies, visual culture, knowledge production, and social movements. Her dissertation examines how online open-source i... Read More →
DK

Dia Kayyali

Program Manager, tech + advocacy, WITNESS
Dia Kayyali coordinates WITNESS’ tech + advocacy work, engaging with technology companies and working on tools and policies that help human rights advocates safely, securely and ethically document human rights abuses and expose them to the world.
avatar for Alexa Koenig

Alexa Koenig

Executive Director, Human Rights Center, UC Berkeley
Alexa is the executive director of the Human Rights Center (winner of the 2015 MacArthur Award for Creative and Effective Institutions) and a lecturer-in-residence at UC Berkeley School of Law, where she teaches classes on human rights and international criminal law. She co-chair... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
202B

10:30

Secure UX Principles: Let's build a checklist for user security and good design
We would present a research and design checklist for people who are developing technologies to help communities at risk. This checklist is designed to promote human rights-centered design by streamlining the process of user research. We believe this resource will aid builders of tools, platforms, and services with limited resources and time.

Whether you are building a platform to help vulnerable communities or providing people with resources for direct tech interventions, it is challenging to ensure the product or service is adaptive to the needs of whose privacy and safety we want to protect. In light of this, we shared our experiences and reviewed best practices in the field to create a checklist with our suggestions conducting research/design to defend human rights online.

Our focus in this session is on interaction and engagement. The session format will be a group-based discussion, to allow flexibility with varying numbers of participants. We would start by learning about the participants’ backgrounds, followed by a brief introduction to the checklist. Afterwards, we would break up into small groups, depending on the size of participation, with a series of questions to discuss. The session will wrap up with bullet points of outcomes and insights share by each group. We will document the whole process and share reflections at the conclusion of the session.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Wu, Min Hsuan (ttcat)

Wu, Min Hsuan (ttcat)

Deputy CEO, Open Culture Foundation
Ttcat is an activist/campaigner of a number of social movements in Taiwan start from 2004, including the anti-nuclear, environmental, LGBT, Human Rights movement and green politic. He has expertise in creative planning, as well as communication and design programming. He has prov... Read More →
avatar for Natalie Cadranel

Natalie Cadranel

Founder & Director, OpenArchive
Natalie is the founder and director of OpenArchive, a free, open-source mobile--archive project for those managing sensitive mobile media. Leveraging the efforts of the Internet Archive, Tor, the Guardian Project, and Creative Commons, this media ecosystem gives history's first r... Read More →
AL

Anqi Li

Access Now
avatar for Caroline Sinders

Caroline Sinders

Founder, Design Researcher, Convocation Design and Research
Founder and Designer Researcher for Convocation Design: working at the intersections of product design, strategy, public good, data and machine learning.
avatar for Tom Trewinnard

Tom Trewinnard

Programs & Partnerships, Meedan
Tom Trewinnard (UK) is Director of Programs at Meedan, a social technology non-profit working on the Check project to develop collaborative verification tools and open training curricula. He is a co-founder of Pop-Up Newsrooms, which has led major collaborative reporting initiati... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
201C

10:30

Digital Access: Bridging the divide or bringing exclusion?
The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Human Development Report 2016[1] indicates that although average human development, improved significantly across all regions over the last fifteen years, one in three people worldwide still continue to live in low levels of human development. Systemic discrimination against women, indigenous peoples and ethnic minorities, among other groups, are the barriers which are leaving them behind.
The ITU Report on ICT Facts and Figures 2016 indicates that the global Internet user gender gap has grown from 11% in 2013 to 12.2% in 2016 and developing nations such as Africa (23%) have a larger access gap than developed nations such as Americas (2%). They had further estimated that by the end of 2016, only one in seven people is expected to be online from Least Developing Nations (LDCs), of which, only 31% of them would be women. Such digital divides arising out of economic, gender disparities, discrimination and inequalities, especially of people living in the developing and least developed countries, have severely impacted the digital divide. The session will focus on digital divide having focus on gender, access to rural communities, places with low connectivity and accessibility for PWDs. The Session is focusing on 'digital access & exclusion'. The session will delve into
broad parameters of digital exclusion such as gender, poverty, disability, geographical barrier, education, age, and restriction by the state and non-state actors. This session will be aiming to discuss how enforcing digital access leads to exclusion by in large. The session will identify stronger focus on those excluded and on actions to dismantle these barriers is urgently needed to ensure that everyone gets equal access online.

Moderators
avatar for Jac sm Kee

Jac sm Kee

Women's Rights Programme Manager, Association for Progressive Communication

Speakers
avatar for María Paz Canales

María Paz Canales

Executive Director, Derechos Digitales
avatar for Rebecca Mackinnon

Rebecca Mackinnon

Director, Ranking Digital Rights
Rebecca MacKinnon is director of the Ranking Digital Rights project which works to set global standards for how companies in the information and communications technology (ICT) sector and beyond should respect freedom of expression and privacy. In 2018 project's flagship Corporat... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
206D

10:30

Elections and information disorders in Latin America.
Most of the conversation regarding 'fake news' has been dominated by the latest presidential campaign in the United States and Europe. However, in Latin America misinformation is not one of the biggest challenges today, but has been for a very long time. We want to foster an open conversation and provide space for sharing anecdotal evidence, compiled across the region, related to the use of different technologies, or organised strategies, to introduce noise into the information channels available to the public. In recent times, there is evidence of the use of bots, centres of paid troll armies, volunteer work of online disinformation, and tools for targeted marketing (including the hire of specialised agencies), all used to mobilise for or against political ideas and candidates. With an ongoing election cycle coming in Latin America we perceive the urgent need to gather more data about the phenomenon, and at the same time discuss with civil society organisations the most effective strategy to drive public attention on these manipulations, fostering critical thinking. It is also relevant to discuss and design strategies to educate and get the involvement of local authorities around the acquisition and use of these technologies, and see how they should be assessed within the local electoral laws.

Moderators
avatar for María Paz Canales

María Paz Canales

Executive Director, Derechos Digitales

Speakers
avatar for Gisela Pérez de Acha

Gisela Pérez de Acha

Public Policy Officer for Latin America, Derechos Digitales
Gisela Perez de Acha is a Mexican lawyer and activist who specialises in free speech and gender rights within the digital world. She is the public policy officer for Latin America at Derechos Digitales, a non-governmental organisation where she mostly conducts research on algorit... Read More →
avatar for Renata Avila

Renata Avila

Senior Digital Rights Advisor, World Wide Web Foundation - Public Citizen Consultant
Renata Avila, Guatemalan, is an international lawyer and digital rights advocate. Specializing in Intellectual Property and Technology, her work addresses the intersection between human rights, information, technological change and the power disparities between the Global North a... Read More →
avatar for Iria Puyosa

Iria Puyosa

Researcher - Consultant, Huaira
Researcher and consultant on internet policies at Huaira, a NGO working in the Andean Region. She holds a PhD from the University of Michigan. Her recent research projects are related to internet censorship, online political campaigns,online propaganda and disinformation, and net... Read More →
avatar for Taisa Sganzerla

Taisa Sganzerla

Lusophone News Editor, Global Voices
@taisasganzerla


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
205B

10:30

Lightning Talks: Responses to Fake News: Blockchain, Critical Thought or Criminalization
Session Emcee: Nathan White

There is only one solution to the fake news problem...
(Independent)

Speakers: Shane Greenup

The problem with fake news and all forms of misinformation is not the misinformation itself, but the fact that people believe it. The solution to this massive problem lies no in removing or hiding the misinformation, but in changing how people respond to it.

Any proposed solution which focuses on the misinformation itself is destined to fail (it is impossible to stop people from creating and spreading misinformation), or destined to create far greater problems than it solves (if all content online is filtered for truth, then people will learn to believe everything they read).

The only way to solve this problem is to find a solution which creates a constant influence over the global population towards improved critical reading and ability to detect misinformation.

The web itself must become a force for teaching critical thinking skills.

REAL "FAKE NEWS" OR MERE EXPRESSION? : FORGING AN EFFECTIVE HUMAN RIGHTS-BASED RESPONSE TO FAKE NEWS IN SOUTHEAST-ASIA (Advocates for Freedom of Expressiom Coalition - Southeast Asia (AFEC-SEA) and Centre for International Law Philippines (CenterLaw))

Speakers: Gilbert T. Andres

This is a lightning talk on whether or not the criminalization of fake news conforms to international human rights law, and whether there is even a need for anti-fake news laws. The lightning talk will propose a human rights-based approach to the rise of fake news in Southeast Asia, and effective alternatives to criminalization that can be a lesson for the rest of the world.

Fact Checking: Fake News and the Roles of the Press in Africa

Speakers:
 
Julie Owono

The session is supposed to explore and discuss the potential and dilemmas of the use of fake news online .

Misinformation is about demand, not just supply (News Co/Lab, Cronkite School, ASU)

Speakers: Dan Gillmor

Most of the focus in fighting misinformation has been on the supply side -- fixing journalism; getting dominant tech platforms to behave better; etc. We definitely need better journalism, and a better overall supply of information. But we should not take the dangerous step of making Facebook, Google, et al the editors of the Internet.

As we upgrade supply, we should focus at least as much on the demand side -- upgrading all of us, starting by making critical thinking a lifelong skill -- so that we can judge and understand for ourselves. And we need to do this at scale, by involving educators/librarians, media organizations, and the technology industry.

Information Disorder (Harvard Kennedy School/MIT Media Lab)

Speakers:
 Hossein Derakhshan

Without a shared definition and the right questions, thinking about answers is pointless. Information Disorder is a complex notion which as three types, three phases, and three elements.

Speakers
avatar for Gilbert T. Andres

Gilbert T. Andres

AFEC-SEA Chairperson and CenterLaw Deputy Executive Director, Advocates for Freedom of Expression Coalition-Southeast Asia (AFEC-SEA) and Center for International Law (CenterLaw Phil
Gilbert T. Andres is a Deputy Executive Director of the Center for International Law Philippines (CenterLaw), a human rights and rule of law NGO based in the Philippines. He is the Chairperson of the Advocates for Freedom of Expression Coalition-Southeast Asia (AFEC-SEA), a regio... Read More →
avatar for Hossein Derakhshan

Hossein Derakhshan

Research fellow, Harvard Shorenstein Center / MIT Media Lab
Hossein Derakhshan is an Iranian-Canadian writer and researcher, and a pioneer of blogging in Iran. He is a research fellow at Harvard Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center and a research associate at the MIT Media Lab. He recently co-authored the report Information Disorder, co... Read More →
avatar for Dan Gillmor

Dan Gillmor

Director, News Co/Lab, Arizona State University
More about me at http://dangillmor.com/about -- I'll talk with anyone anytime about media, journalism, news literacy, tech centralization, surveillance.
avatar for Shane Greenup

Shane Greenup

CEO, rbutr
Misinformation, fake news, critical thinking, skepticism, blockchain, open access, open source, and much more.
avatar for Julie Owono

Julie Owono

Executive Director, Internet Sans frontières
I work at the intersection of Tech, Human Rights, Business. | I am a lawyer, and the Executive Director of Internet Without Borders, an organisation defending digital rights, and an open Internet for all.



Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
205A

10:30

Breaking the Silence: Digital Media and the Struggle for LGBTQ Rights in Iran
This session will launch 'Breaking the Silence', Small Media’s new report examining the situation of the LGBTQ community in Iran, and will bring together a panel of LGBTQ activists, content producers, and digital security experts to discuss the most urgent needs of the community as of 2018.

The report itself assesses the digital media development needs of Iran’s LGBTQ community, and explores some of the ways in which tech is being used to deliver vital information and sexual/mental health support services to marginalised and vulnerable populations. We will discuss how community organisations have been able to leverage the popularity of platforms like Instagram and Telegram to deliver services to LGBTQ citizens, while remaining alert to a host of online threats.

In our discussion we will identify some key activities for advocates and LGBTQ organisations to undertake to support the digital media needs of the LGBTQ community as identified in Small Media's report.

Moderators
Speakers
AR

Afsaneh Rigot

ARTICLE 19
Article 19 is a London-based human rights organization with a specific mandate and focus on the defense and promotion of freedom of expression and freedom of information worldwide founded in 1987. Afsaneh, works on Iran human rights issues in the MENA region, predominately freed... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
200C

10:30

The global state of data protection
As lawmakers develop or update data protection around the world, we seek to organise a roundtable to hear about ongoing process in Tunisia, India, Pakistan, Canada, the EU and more! This session is designed to discuss both the creation and the enforcement of data protection and privacy rights, and actuals in particular. The objective of this roundtable is to learn more about ongoing negotiations, similarities and differences between laws, and discuss possible need for global cooperation. To do so, we will invite few speakers to deliver introductory remarks and few people to participate as respondent. The roundtable will be open to the public and should lead to an interactive debate on the global state of data protection.

Moderators
avatar for Estelle Masse

Estelle Masse

Senior Policy Analyst, Access Now
Data protection, GDPR, Privacy, Net Neutrality

Speakers
avatar for Wafa Ben-Hassine

Wafa Ben-Hassine

Policy Counsel, MENA, Access Now
Wafa Ben-Hassine is Access Now's MENA Policy Counsel. Access Now is a global organization that works to defend and extend the digital rights of users at rights.
avatar for Nighat Dad

Nighat Dad

Founder and Director, Digital Rights Foundation
avatar for Amba Kak

Amba Kak

Tech policy fellow, Mozilla
avatar for Wojciech Wiewiorowski

Wojciech Wiewiorowski

Assistant Supervisor at the European Data Protection Supervisor


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
205C

10:30

Global Perspectives on Technology Facilitated Violence Against Women and Girls

Contemporary technology - including social media platforms, mobile phones, Artificial Intelligence, robotics, and many others – can positively impact the advancement of gender equality. At the same time, it can aggravate existing and enable new forms of violence against women and girls (VAWG). Technology facilitated VAWG is a growing and a constantly evolving phenomenon that brings devastating consequences for the lives of women and girls around the world from all walks of life. Join us for a discussion about emerging trends; international responses; and what can we do next to combat the problem.


Moderators
TD

Tara Denham

Director, Democracy Unit, Office of Human Rights, Freedoms and Inclusion, Global Affairs Canada, Government of Canada

Speakers
avatar for Anja Kovacs

Anja Kovacs

Director, Internet Democracy Project
Dr. Anja Kovacs directs the Internet Democracy Project in Delhi. India, which works towards an Internet that supports freedom of expression, democracy and social justice. Anja’s research currently focuses especially on questions regarding cybersecurity, surveillance and privacy... Read More →
avatar for Priya Kumar

Priya Kumar

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Social Media Lab, Ryerson University
@link_priya
avatar for David Mattingly

David Mattingly

Vice President for Programs, Fund fro Global Human Rights
As Vice President for Programs for the Fund for Global Human Rights, David is responsible for oversight, coordination, and integration of human rights grant-making in six regions around the world. Since joining the Fund in 2005, David has managed grants programs for frontline gro... Read More →
avatar for Kristen Thomasen

Kristen Thomasen

Assistant Professor ~ Law, Robotics & Society, Windsor Law
I research and write on legal issues related to robotics and AI. I have especially focused on the privacy and equity implications of robotic technologies, including the gendered privacy impact of drones and the ways in which robotic technologies affect the use of and access to pu... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
203A

10:30

Shooting the messenger: the rise of intermediary liability around the world
Several recently proposed or enacted laws (NetzDG in Germany, Venezuela's hate speech law, SESTA/FOSTA in the U.S.) make Internet platforms, search engines, web hosts, and/or other facilitators of online expression legally responsible for illegal content posted by third parties. This session will try to understand what is motivating these proposals, what they have in common, t, and what can be done to mitigate their impacts on freedom of expression. It will also consider what technological, corporate, and multistakeholder tools can be used to effectively address the underlying concerns that these proposals seek to regulate.

Moderators
avatar for Jason Pielemeier

Jason Pielemeier

Policy Director, Global Network Initiative

Speakers
avatar for Sunita Bose

Sunita Bose

Head of Policy & Global Brand, Change.org
Sunita Bose established and leads the policy team at Change.org, an Internet platform that empowers 200 million of people worldwide to create petitions on issues that matter to them. She has led the redevelopment of the company’s Privacy Policy, Terms of Service, Community Guid... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
204B

10:30

Fireside Chat with Reddit CEO Steve Huffman and GC Melissa Tidwell
Moderators
avatar for Andrew McLaughlin

Andrew McLaughlin

Cofounder / Partner, Higher Ground Labs / Yale U
Andrew McLaughlin is co-founder and partner at Higher Ground Labs, an investment and acceleration firm for progressive campaign tech. He is also executive director of the Center for Innovative Thinking at Yale University, and a venture partner at betaworks. | | Andrew is chairma... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Steve Huffman

Steve Huffman

CEO & Co-founder, Reddit
Steve Huffman is an American web developer, who founded the social networking website Reddit. After reddit, he co-founded the airfare search-engine site Hipmunk. | | He attended the University of Virginia, where he majored in Computer Science. After graduating, Huffman partenered with... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Tidwell

Melissa Tidwell

Reddit, Vice President & General Counsel
Melissa Tidwell is Vice President and General Counsel at Reddit, advising on a wide range of legal and business matters and managing the company’s Legal, Policy, and Communications groups. Previously, Melissa was Senior Counsel at Google, advising the Product, Engineering, Busi... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
204C

10:30

LIVE FROM GAZA: Telecon Bridge with Palestinian NGOs, Youth in Gaza City and Khan Younis

Join a portal, Live from Gaza, to hear young writers, NGO directors, and a solar entrepreneur from within the blockade as they describe what they are seeing in the unfolding human rights emergency.

Here are our speakers and audience in Gaza: 

  • Dr. Abu-Jamei, Director of the Gaza Community Mental Health Programme
  • Iyad Al Ejel, Director of the Youth Vision Society, serving the Beach Refugee Camp (and his translator Neveen Naser)
  • Three writers from We Are Not Numbers, seeking to convey the daily personal struggles and triumphs, tears, laughter, and aspirations, including coverage of the Great March of Return.
  • Majd Mashharawi, solar-tech entrepreneur founder of SunBox:
  • Tareq Al Hinde awarded a Scholarship in US but no permit to exit Gaza; and
  • Ali Bari who works with the Quakers on youth activities.
The teleconference is hosted by Donna Baranski-Walker, Director of Rebuilding Alliance, through a program called Project Open Gaza Connect.  The portal, hosted by Mira Bakri at MercyCorps in Gaza, offers immersive audiovisual technology that can make discussion live and full-body, as if in the same room.

Speakers
MS

Mattias Schmale

Gaza Operations Director, UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees (UNRWA)


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
200A
  • Host Organization Rebuilding Alliance

10:30

Smart Cities, Smart Decisions: the personal data of smart city citizens
This session will bring together panelists from the public sector, private sector and academia to discuss the privacy and data implications of smart cities and smart quarters, as Canada kicks off its Smart Cities Challenge and Toronto is poised to develop a smart neighborhood in the heart of the city. Smart cities function on sensors and IoT, collecting data not only environmental data but also personal data of individuals to interact or even walk through the space. The parameters of data collection and use are not always explicitly explained, meaning that individuals are not likely aware of what their collected data is being used for. This can have serious implications for individuals’ privacy rights in the name of innovation. We will be exploring the balance for privacy and data interests on one hand, and innovation for the purpose of improving lives within the smart city paradigm on the other.
This panel will to shed light on the practical issues and implications of leaving a data trail, even unintentionally, while also participating in a project that will generate tremendous amounts of data to the private and public sectors for the purpose of make life more sustainable, environmentally friendly and technologically advanced. The discussion will elicit thought provoking issues related to the value of personal data for companies, the government and for the individual, and to explore whether it is possible to collect data without identifying an individual, whether privacy and data collection regulation can mitigate the pitfalls of living in a connected and interconnected world.

Moderators
avatar for Bassem Awad

Bassem Awad

Deputy Director for Intellectual Property Law and Innovation, Centre for International Governance Innovation
Bassem Awad is deputy director of international intellectual property (IP) law and innovation with the Centre for International Governance Innovation in Canada. At CIGI, Bassem manage number of research projects on the governance of IP rights; preferential trade agreements; and I... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for David Goodis

David Goodis

Assistant Commissioner, Policy and Corporate Services, Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario
David Goodis is Assistant Commissioner (Policy & Corporate Services) with the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario. David is a graduate of Western University’s law school, and was called to the Ontario Bar in 1988. David has represented the IPC in hearings before t... Read More →
avatar for Kurtis McBride

Kurtis McBride

CEO/founder, Miovision
I am passionate about helping cities become smarter through technology and data, and I believe that the systems used to build smart cities should be built with open architecture to encourage innovation.
avatar for Teresa Scassa

Teresa Scassa

Canada Research Chair in Information Law and Policy, University of Ottawa
My current research focuses on balancing claims to ownership rights in data with the public interest. I also work on privacy and data protection issues. My current projects involve legal issues relating to the scraping of publicly accessible data; data and smart cities; and open... Read More →
avatar for Bianca Wylie

Bianca Wylie

Co-founder, Tech Reset Canada
Co-Founder, Tech Reset Canada & Senior Fellow, CIGI


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
206B

10:30

Video Forensics at The New York Times
Video Forensics at The New York Times

Who launched a chemical attack in Syria? Who assaulted protesters a mere mile from the White House? How did a gunman manage to kill 59 people at a concert in Las Vegas? How did weapons, trafficked aboard vessels in Sardinia, come to be used in airstrikes on civilians in Yemen?

Using an innovative form of investigation, The New York Times has published distinct reports that not only answered these questions but also brought these complex stories to life through pioneering visual storytelling. Combined, they demonstrate next-generation truth-telling.

In this presentation, Malachy Browne, Senior Producer with The Times will showcase the reporting behind this form of video investigation, or so-called visual forensics. He will outline the presentation techniques that distill the evidence and make the story accessible to a broad audience.

The reporting incorporates some of the latest digital evidence and technologies provided by the evolving information environment: satellite imagery and photo metadata, geo-spatial analysis and mapping techniques, technical analysis of audio waveforms and video evidence that examines every decibel and pixel. The reporting incorporates collaborations with career experts, interviews with eyewitnesses and other traditional reporting.

And Mr. Browne will talk about the vision for this nascent reporting unit in The Times, including partnerships with independent experts and investigators in the human rights and tech space.    

A playlist of Visual Investigations at the New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/video/investigations

Speakers
avatar for Malachy Browne

Malachy Browne

Senior Story Producer, New York Times


Thursday May 17, 2018 10:30 - 11:45
204A

11:00

Beyond the Hype Cycle: What does Blockchain Mean for Human Rights Online?
Trust in corporations, governments, civil society and the media is in unprecedented crisis globally (see Edelman Trust Barometer: https://www.edelman.com/trust2017/). Citizens have lost faith in institutions, experts, and former gatekeepers of truth. This has worrying implications for democracy and human rights advocates attempting to build more inclusive, open societies.
Distributed ledger technology such as blockchain is being heralded as a potential antidote to corrupt systems: as a mechanism for improving transparency in government; giving people control over their digital identities; eliminating untrustworthy middlemen; and validating facts without need of a central decider of truth. However, the bulk of the energy and vast majority of the investment has been in financial technologies or other corporate applications. New alliances between the private sector, academia and blockchain companies are emerging to fill this gap and apply the power of distributed ledger technology to these critical social problems. As one example, the Blockchain Trust Accelerator, a multi-stakeholder collaboration led by the New America Foundation, BitFury, and NDI, is attempting to bring together international civil society with blockchain-based businesses to research, pilot and scale blockchain for social impact pilots. Harvard University’s Berkman Center is similarly working to apply emerging blockchain technologies to bootstrap improvements to democracy. The panelists hope to foster a conversation in the RightsCon community on who is or would like to be using blockchain for human rights and democratic advocacy - and how.
In particular, the discussion would include:
- Information on current pilot projects and lessons learned from the Blockchain Trust Accelerator
- Open sharing of other blockchain initiatives, in whatever phase
- Discussion of the ways in which blockchain can - and won’t - be useful to the RightsCon community
- Ways the Blockchain Trust Accelerator or academic institutions like the Harvard Berkman Center may be able to assist social good-focused organizations

Moderators
avatar for Chris Doten

Chris Doten

Chief Innovation Officer, National Democratic Institute (NDI)
Super interested in global politics and tech - how do you help individuals organize for more democratic societies, and how do you help political institutions keep up with their people as they get swamped by the tech tsunami? | | Lead for DemTools initiative (https://dem.tools... Read More →

Speakers

Thursday May 17, 2018 11:00 - 11:25
Village Main Stage

11:30

Mapping the Artificial Intelligence, Networked Hate, and Human Rights Landscape

This session will consist of an introductory 10 minute presentation followed by a 15 minute discussion. We will share results of the “Mapping the Artificial Intelligence, Networked Hate, and Human Rights Landscape” research and outreach project at MIGS’s Digital Mass Atrocity Prevention Lab. This project is running from November 2017 until April 2018 and is conducted in collaboration with the Digital Inclusion Lab at Global Affairs Canada. The goal of the project is to map out and better understand the global Artificial Intelligence, Networked Hate, and Human Rights landscape with a special focus on the role and extend of Artificial Intelligence systems in the takedown of extremist content on social media platforms.

We will also share insights from a related research trip to Germany which zooms in on the societal and parliamentary discussions around (and early experiences with) the German Network Enforcement Act (or, as some call it: the “Facebook act”). We finished conducting interviews with representatives from Think Tanks (e.g. Stiftung Neue Verantwortung, Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik), research centers (e.g. Center for Internet and Human Rights, Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society), German Parliament staff who worked on the law, and members of the Global Diplomacy Lab (an initiative by the German Foreign Ministry).

Additionally, in our session we plan to discuss outcomes of a workshop in March 2018 which we host in collaboration with with the Tech Against Terrorism project. Together we examined AI system’s application for the takedown of extremist content, AI’s possible acceleratory effects for extremist causes and ideologies, and AI system’s potential misuse by terror organisations.”


Speakers
avatar for Kyle Matthews

Kyle Matthews

Executive Director, Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies
Kyle Matthews is the Executive Director of the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies (MIGS) at Concordia University. He joined MIGS as Lead Researcher of the Will to Intervene Project in 2008 and was appointed Senior Deputy Director in 2011. At Concordia he fou... Read More →
NP

Nicolai Pogadl

Project Manager and Researcher, Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies (MIGS) at Concordia University
Nicolai Pogadl is a project manager at the Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies (MIGS) at Concordia University, and a researcher at its Digital Mass Atrocity Prevention Lab (DMAP Lab). He focuses on policy-oriented and collaborative research projects at the in... Read More →
MR

Mohammad Rostami

Research Officer, Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies (MIGS)
Mohammad Rostami's research focuses on the use of emerging technologies in monitoring and disrupting terrorist organization's use of the internet.


Thursday May 17, 2018 11:30 - 11:55
Village Main Stage
  • Host Organization Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights
  • Tags 295

12:00

Inventing Digital Civil Society
Independent space for civil society is threatened in the digital age. Recreating, or inventing, space for digital civil society requires simultaneous progress in four domains - technological change, organizational structure, legal protections, and social behavior. In this session we'll present some of the key findings from a year long global investigation of these ideas, hear about progress being made in Canada, and engage in discussion with participants about if/how the framework aligns with their work.

Speakers
LB

Lucy Bernholz

Stanford U
avatar for Arisha Khan

Arisha Khan

Vice President, Youth in Care Canada | Jeunes pris en charge Canada
@arisha_khan1 | I am the Vice-President of Youth in Care Canada, a national charitable organization providing resources, advocacy and support to youth in and from Canada's child welfare system. | | I am passionate about the intersections of technology, data, and policy to impro... Read More →
avatar for Jon McPhedran Waitzer

Jon McPhedran Waitzer

Network & Engagement Advisor, Powered by Data
Jon is passionate about convening diverse stakeholders around shared interests in a data-enabled social sector, with a commitment to facilitating equitable participation across differences in power and position. Jon's professional experience includes leadership roles across the f... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 12:00 - 12:25
Village Main Stage

12:00

Mobilising the Might of Rights: A Human Rights Based Approach to AI
AI’s impact on society demands scrutiny of the ways in which it is designed and deployed. Debates have ensued on how to ensure that AI benefits all in society and contributes to, rather than threatens, human rights. A human rights based approach to AI offers a holistic, universal and enforceable solution.

The session will focus on the might of rights in the design and deployment of AI. Discussions will first highlight the benefits of placing international human rights standards and norms at the centre of debates. Participants will tackle the current challenges in advancing and implementing a human rights based approach to the development and use of AI, and suggest practical solutions. The session will then explore priority areas in the conceptualisation of a human rights based approach and, together, we will identify how best to mobilise stakeholders to adopt such an approach.

Moderators
Speakers
TD

Tara Denham

Director, Democracy Unit, Office of Human Rights, Freedoms and Inclusion, Global Affairs Canada, Government of Canada
avatar for Ansgar Koene

Ansgar Koene

Senior Research Fellow: UnBIAS, CaSMa & Horizon Policy Impact - Horizon Digital Economy Research Institute, University of Nottingham; Working Group Chair - IEEE Standard on Algorithm Bias Considerations


Thursday May 17, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
202B

12:00

Robots and Rights: Exploring the Impacts of Automation on the Future of Work
In recent years, the “future of work” has been a topic of heated debate and speculation. Experts predict that we are approaching a point in history at which the majority of jobs can be automated. The rapid advance of robotics and artificial intelligence inexorably shapes corporate incentives to mechanize operations, raising pressing and difficult questions—for business and society alike—regarding jobs, workers, and wages.

This emerging business paradigm supposes a radical shift in the global economy, with potentially devastating economic and social impacts on the most vulnerable populations. A recent study by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development suggests that better and cheaper robots will shift the demand for low-skilled labor from developing to developed countries—leaving large amounts of low-skilled workers in global supply chains unemployed. At the same time, however, automation of low-skilled jobs promises powerful benefits for human rights, from better workplace safety to the lower risk of modern slavery, child labor, and other human rights abuses.

Governments and the private sector have yet to adequately grapple with this dilemma. The inevitability of technological advance, the complex interplay of costs and benefits for society at large, and the rising tide of economic nationalism will require intelligent and well thought-through policy responses. This session seeks to bring together leaders from public and private sectors, labor, and civil society to discuss the array of challenges robots pose to workers from a human rights perspective. With a panel representing diverse perspectives, we will aim to curate a discussion that explores the many layers and dimensions of the challenge facing governments, business, and civil society. The goal will not be to arrive at definitive solutions but to frame issues and define avenues for future research, engagement, and activism.

Moderators
avatar for Yousuf Aftab

Yousuf Aftab

Yousuf is the founder and principal of Enodo Rights. He has extensive experience advising leading multinationals across sectors on strategic implementation of the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights to navigate corporate responsibility risks, including legal, politica... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sunil Johal

Sunil Johal

Policy Director, Mowat Centre, School of Public Policy & Governance, University of Toronto
Sunil Johal is Policy Director at the Mowat Centre, an independent public policy think tank at the University of Toronto. He leads the Centre’s research activities, manages the research team and teaches a variety of executive education courses. He is frequently invited to advis... Read More →
avatar for Sarah McGrath

Sarah McGrath

Legal & Policy Director, International Corporate Accountability Roundtable (ICAR)
Sarah McGrath is the Legal and Policy Director at the International Corporate Accountability Roundtable (ICAR), an organization harnessing the collective power of progressive organizations to push governments to create and enforce rules over corporations that promote human rights... Read More →
avatar for Vinicius Pinheiro

Vinicius Pinheiro

Special Representative of the UN and Director, ILO Office of the United Nations
Special Representative to the UN and Director of the ILO Office for the United Nations since the 1st of February 2016. Prior to his assumption as Director, he worked as the Deputy Director of the ILO Office for the United Nations in New York (ILO-New York), joining the team on 1... Read More →
avatar for Kelly Ross

Kelly Ross

Deputy Policy Director, AFL-CIO
Kelly Ross has been Deputy Policy Director of the AFL-CIO since 2010, and has been with the AFL-CIO since 2002.  He has also been a member of the International Labor Organization’s (ILO) Governing Body and Committee on Freedom of Association since February 2015.  He is curren... Read More →
avatar for Amit Singh

Amit Singh

Global Lead, Uber
Amit Singh is Uber’s Head of Public Policy (Future of Work). He previously served as the Senior Economic Adviser to Australian Prime Ministers Rudd and Gillard. Earlier in his career, he worked as a capital markets lawyer and a corporate M&A adviser, as well as co-founder of a... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
203A

12:00

This Panel May Contain Sensitive Content: Automated Filtering and the Future of Free Expression Online
Who chooses what you can say online? Social media companies and search engines are under growing pressure from governments, their user base to address the existence and apparent proliferation of pernicious online behaviour on their platforms such as hate speech, terrorist recruitment, and targeted harassment. In response, many public- and private-sector researchers are exploring engineering solutions that make use of machine learning to automatically filter and remove content.

This roundtable discussion will feature input from policy, social-science, technical experts as we discuss: What are the risks of this move to automation in communications governance? What are the underlying values we seek to preserve? And how can we better communicate with both the public and policymakers about these developments?

The overarching goal of the workshop is to build participants’ capacity to understand and engage with the complex topic of AI and communication regulation and develop projects for future collaboration. Participants will come away with a better understanding of the current technical capabilities and limits of automation across a variety of content and methods of analysis and a core set of risks and necessary safeguards to avoid the harmful consequences of thoughtless automation in content regulation. This roundtable will be a useful convening opportunity for free expression advocates, academics, and industry to share ideas and strategies for engaging with policymakers and the public on these complex and important topics.

Moderators
avatar for Emma Llanso

Emma Llanso

Director, Free Expression Project, Center for Democracy & Technology

Speakers
ND

Natasha Duarte

Policy Analyst, Center for Democracy & Technology
avatar for Nick Feamster

Nick Feamster

Professor, Princeton University, Princeton
Online censorship, automated abuse detection, content moderation.
avatar for Jonathan Penn

Jonathan Penn

University of Cambridge
Doctoral researcher studying the history and philosophy of artificial intelligence at the University of Cambridge. | | Google Technology Policy Fellow at the European Youth Forum working on the impact of artificial intelligence on life for young people in Europe. Former fellow... Read More →
avatar for Amy Zhang

Amy Zhang

Researcher, MIT CSAIL
online harassment, misinformation, collaboration tools, discussion tools


Thursday May 17, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
201B

12:00

Who Did it? Why we need an International Cyber Attribution Organization to address nation-state attacks in cyberspace
This session is intended to explore the feasibility of creating a neutral global institution to perform authoritative public cyber-attributions. Attribution of a cyberattack is important because it contributes to the accountability of actors in cyberspace. The need for it is especially great in the case of nation-state actors. Due to heavy secrecy and mistrust surrounding state security institutions, an attribution made by one nation-state is unlikely to be accepted as neutral and authoritative by other nation-states, especially if those states are rivals or hostile. There are proposals to respond to this beed by creating an independent organization (or set of processes) whose attribution decisions are widely perceived as unbiased, legitimate and valid, even among parties who might be antagonistic (such as rival nation-states). Various commentators on this issue have proposed that this institution exclude governments and be led by experts in academia and business. But would that work in a cyber-environment in which states increasingly assert their power? The session will bring together both advocates and skeptics of the proposal for an international attribution organization to explore its feasibility, its institutional design and whether it will ever get off the ground.

Moderators
avatar for Milton Mueller

Milton Mueller

Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology
(TBC) Milton Mueller is Professor at the School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA. Mueller received the Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School in 1989. His research focuses on rights, institutions and global governance in communication... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Brown

Deborah Brown

Association for Progressive Communications
avatar for Brenden Kuerbis

Brenden Kuerbis

Postdoctoral Fellow, Georgia Tech, School of Public Policy
Brenden Kuerbis is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Georgia Tech's School of Public Policy and a former Fellow in Internet Security Governance at the Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto. His research generally focuses on the governance of Internet identi... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
200C

12:00

Engaging Citizens at Scale in Restrictive Environments
Welcome to the new world of “global citizen voice”. New technologies are enabling organizations to rapidly and safely access citizen opinions in every country in the world, including otherwise “closed” societies, to help support the development and implementation of social policy and initiatives.

This interactive panel will bring together leaders from various global rights organizations with deep experience in global citizen engagement, specifically in traditionally hard to reach countries, and from various fields of human rights, including: gender equality, migrant workers, and LGBTQ+ rights.

Each will briefly discuss how they are leveraging innovative technology to access “citizen voice”, particularly among previously “unreachable” populations, in order to inform, design, and maximize the impact of their social initiatives and campaigns, while at the same time ensuring respondents’ anonymity and security. Q+A will follow.

Moderators
avatar for Eric Meerkamper

Eric Meerkamper

Global Head, Citizen Engagement, RIWI Corp.
Eric is the Global Head of Citizen Engagement at RIWI, based in Toronto. | | RIWI is a global survey technology and sentiment analysis firm that gathers citizen opinion data and accelerates engagement initiatives in every country in the world using its patented technology. To d... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Vukasin Petrovic

Vukasin Petrovic

Senior Director for Program Strategy, Freedom House
I serve as the Senior Director for Program Strategy and as the Technical Director for USAID funded Human Rights Support Mechanism. I am responsible for defining Freedom House’s thematic and regional program priorities, design and oversight of cutting-edge programs that focus on... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
203B

12:00

My Network. My Choice - An overview of feminist and antipatriarchal autonomous infrastructures, from servers to hackerspaces
In the past few years, feminist autonomous infrastructures and feminist technologies such as servers, lists and bots, among others have emerged. These infrastructures have been initiated, crafted, and maintained by feminist technologists, hacktivists and researchers, among others. Feminist autonomous infrastructures and technologies are a way to challege dominant narratives, assumptions and myths about technology; It is also a response to violence, a means to (re)imagine new practices of resistance for social transformation, and a way to embed feminist values and codes in infrastructures and technologies.

Experimenting with technologies of many different sorts, from information technology to biohacking, these feminist collectives have created physical, logical, and human resources for providing mutual help and support, sharing knowledge ranging from system administration to self-defense against digital and physical harassment alike, and creating spaces for feminist, anti-patriarchal, and queer groups and individuals to store their memory and voice their opinions.

The aim of the session is twofold. First, it is about sharing among existing feminist tech and feminist autonomous infrastructure projects. Second, it aims to make an intervention at the level of discourse and of the imaginary. The session will take the form of a roundtable where feminist autonomous projects will be presented. The presented projects will include: feminist servers Vedetas (Brazil, https://vedetas.org/), Systerserver (Europe and North America, https://systerserver.net/), Anarchaserver (Europe and Latin America, http://anarchaserver.org/), and hackerspaces Heart of Code (Berlin, http://heartofcode.org/), MariaLab (Brazil, http://marialab.org/), FemHack (Montreal, https://femhack.noblogs.org/)... and, we hope, many more.

Moderators
Speakers

Thursday May 17, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
204A

12:00

Tech Demo Block #3: Privacy and digital security for all
DiY Kit - How to analyze privacy and security at smartphone apps (Karisma Foundation)

Speakers: Maria del Pilar Saenz & Stephane Labarthe

The session is about presenting a methodology of app analysis (for smartphones and tablets), that seek to evaluate transparency, privacy and digital security with a pedagogical approach in a DIY, legal/ethical and non-intrusive way.

Last year, Karisma presented in the RightsCon 2017 his methodology of website analysis in a conference named “DiY Kit - How to analyze Websites”, after publishing its first analysis of a governmental website linked to the Colombian IMEI cellphones registry database (https://karisma.org.co/?wpdmdl=6785). This year, although there were not published in details to respect a non disclosure agreement, Karisma has made other governmental websites analysis. The stronger impact and the advocacy potential of this approach to induce positives changes in a multi-stakeholders and co-responsibility approach was recently presented as an example in two local conferences (Foro de Seguridad Digital 2017 and Barcamp SE Bogotá 2017).

Karisma is now beginning, with the same approach, to analyze smartphone apps. The methodology is a little more complex than the one for website, but the investigation is more interesting since privacy and security concerns are less visible for apps than for websites. Apps seem to be a black box we would like to open: Is this App using HTTPS ? Is this App sharing data with third party actors ? Etc. The evaluation is still based on a methodology that any person (with some basic technical knowledge) can follow in order to make the digital citizen able to audit his favorite apps himself. Similar to the website cases, we do think this methodology can be used as an advocacy tool with governments and other sectors in our countries.

The methodology is principally based on a data flow analysis generated by the app, by connecting the smartphone to an access point setup on a computer. This analysis uses only free software (Wireshark in particular) in order to be easily reproducible. It is not intrusive and to keep us in a legal and ethical path.

We will introduce our methodology and the results of the the analysis of apps in different aspects:
• we will see legal information, transparency, and we will learn how to read technical information about an app;
• we will look for tracking, cookies and privacy concerns (analyze of DNS request and third party request, set-cookies, etc.);
• we will analyze the security of the app, in particular the use of HTTPS.

Interactivity would be promoted making the public participate and give ideas of improvements and possible replica.

Security Education Companion walkthrough (Electronic Frontier Foundation)

Speakers:
 Soraya Okuda

Soraya will give an overview of the Security Education Companion website (sec.eff.org), which is an educational resource for new teachers of digital security. She will solicit feedback and collect ideas for needed educational materials in the digital security space in the remaining minutes of the demo.

MaadiX, your cloud in your hands (MaadiXZone S.L)

Speakers:
 Maddalena Falzoni Gallerani

MaadiX is a practical solution to protect the privacy of our data and to avoid censorship. Instead of being dependent on the services offered by large companies, MaadiX provides journalists, human rights defenders and citizens in general with the digital autonomy and tools they need and use every day, having them running in their own secure space.

We will reveal and share our plan to ensure confidentiality of information as a right and not a luxury, without the need of any previous know-how or significant investment.

Crafting Resilient Communities
(Center for Digital Resilience)

Speakers:
 Josh Levy & Holly Kilroy

The Center for Digital Resilience (CDR) works with regional/thematic communities of NGOs to improve their understanding of the digital threats they face and how to mitigate them. We do this by partnering with a cohort of organizations to identify their needs, and connecting those organizations to qualified digital security trainers. If and when specific threats materialise, we work with digital security experts to facilitate fast, effective responses. With our first projects successfully up and running, we’d like to help more communities improve their digital resilience and bring more experts and service providers in to fill gaps where needed.

This session will be a lighting talk we discuss how activists, digital security experts, and human rights advocates -- and the communities they work with -- might benefit from the CDR model.


Thursday May 17, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
200A

12:00

Addressing the digital divide in Indigenous Communities in North America
While the digital divide is usually framed as an issue of the developing world, significant divides exist in countries with highly developed communications infrastructures. This is certainly the case of Indigenous Peoples in many "developed" countries. According to the Federal Communications Commission, 41% of Americans living on tribal lands lacked access to Internet speeds necessary to do things such as videoconference in 2016. Estimates in Canada show that approximately half of the northern population, regions of the country often predominantly Indigenous, lack the service that resembles the high speeds available to their southern counterparts.

Community networks offer a unique opportunity to overcome these challenges by offering a DIY option to connect. Local communities can join together to pay for the common infrastructure, which can change or grow over time with the community's needs.

This session will engage participants on how to operationalize a set of principles developed and endorsed by the delegates at the Indigenous Connectivity Summit (ICS) held in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The roundtable will include presentations from and discussions with Indigenous community network operators, Indigenous leadership, as well as youth and Elders to discuss the ICS outputs through the lens of the importance of access for empowerment, promotion of culture, education and freedom of expression and access to information.

Moderators
avatar for Mark Buell

Mark Buell

Regional Bureau Director, North America, Internet Society

Speakers
avatar for Bill Murdoch

Bill Murdoch

IT Specialist, Clear Sky Connections
Provide Business and Information Technology (IT) solutions to government and commercial clients. I am known for innovation, customer satisfaction, and fulfilling commitments to clients. Offer a full range of management and technology services including Program/Project Management... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
201C

12:00

Prisoners' Rights in the Digital Age
More than 10.35 million people are in prison globally. In a world in which digital rights are human rights, how can we address the digital rights of prisoners?
This session tries to shed light on the situation of internet access and digital literacy inside prisons. We will examine the risks and benefits of access to the internet inside prisons. We discuss further the right to be forgotten, online privacy, security and education factoring in the importance of digital literacy training during re-entry programs for formerly incarcerated persons and their families.

Moderators
avatar for Roya Pakzad

Roya Pakzad

Researcher, Stanford Global Digital Policy Incubator

Speakers
avatar for Nate Cardozo

Nate Cardozo

Senior Staff Attorney, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Nate Cardozo is a Senior Staff Attorney on EFF’s civil liberties team where he focuses on cybersecurity policy and defending coders’ rights. | | Nate has litigated cases involving electronic surveillance, freedom of information, digital anonymity, online free expression, and... Read More →
avatar for Matt Mitchell

Matt Mitchell

cryptoharlem
latest bio - https://medium.com/@geminiimatt/whoami-a513e9e4c02f | | Matt Mitchell is a hacker, security researcher, operational security trainer, and data journalist who founded & leads CryptoHarlem ( https://twitter.com/cryptoHarlem ), impromptu workshops teaching basic cryptography tools to the predominately African American community in upper Manhattan. Matt is the Director of Digital Safety & Privacy, at Tactical Technology. In his work there Matt leads security training efforts, curricula, and organizational security. Matt trains people as an independent trainer for Global Journalist Security) in digital safety &security. Matt spends his free time training activists in operational and information security. His personal work focuses on marginalized, aggressively monitored, over-policed populations in the United States. Currently he is a tech advisor to the Human Rights Foundation and the Internet Freedom Festival, as well as a member of the advisory board to the Open Technology... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
205C

12:00

Lightning Talks: Quantum Computation, Differential Privacy, and Cybersecurity Threats
Session Emcee: Naman Aggarwal

Hacks Will Keep Happening, It's Time to Get Smart: The Necessity of Encrypted Communications and Challenging the Surrounding Stigma
(Wickr)

Speakers: Joel Wallenstrom

Hacker attacks happen every 39 seconds. No one is immune: the most trivial communications were weaponized to influence the 2016 elections; the majority of internet users had their data exposed with no remedy. Yet, no matter how high profile and impactful the breach is, nothing changes in how safe our information is. What’s more, encrypted communications remain stigmatized despite the urgency to protect critical data, particularly when used in business settings. Ironically, negative optics of having strong privacy hygiene is making privacy accessible only to those willing to risk bad publicity, while the rest of us end up with poor security.

This talk will zero in on how everyone – from political campaigns to activists to governments – can navigate today’s technology so focused on collecting and monetizing user trust to take back control and ownership of our personal and business data. Joel Wallenstrom, Wickr CEO and founder of iSEC Partners, one of the top security research teams, will discuss why there are very few alternatives to data-driven business models and what is missing to jumpstart the boom in privacy tech.

4 years in a war with Russia: How is Ukraine doing with digital rights and cyber security
(Digital Security Lab Ukraine)

Speakers: Iryna Chulivska & Mykola Kostynyan

This lightning talk will be about the situation in Ukraine and what influence 4 years in war with Russia had on it. The main points: Current situation on journalists' rights and internet freedom in Ukraine; Situation with freedom of speech on occupied territories: annexed Crimea peninsula and part of the East Ukraine with ongoing military actions; New laws and attempts to restrict internet under "because of the war's needs" souse.

The Ins and Outs of Differential Privacy (Access Now)

Speakers: Drew Mitnick

This lightning talk will explore the topic of differential privacy and some of the difficulties of implementation in a practical setting. It will then pose the question: how important is the term differential privacy, and should there be standards to guide its use?

The Quantum Threat to Privacy (Cybersecurity and Privacy Institute (CPI) and IQC, University of Waterloo)

Speakers: 
Michele Mosca

Quantum computation offers many positive applications for society, however they will also break the currently deployed public-key cryptography that underpins the security of our information and communication systems.

I currently estimate there is a 1 in 6 chance that quantum computers will break current systems in under a decade. If we don’t migrate our systems to ones designed to be safe against quantum attacks, the cyber security that we rely on to protect our personal privacy - and the technologies and processes that are involved in so many aspects of our daily lives - will be jeopardised as government operations, communication networks and other critical infrastructure systems become vulnerable to hostile actions.

The challenge is that the necessary suite of mature and tested quantum-resistant cryptographic algorithms is not yet available.

Nor are the necessary security- and privacy-enhancing technologies and tools that will be based on those algorithms.

Nor are the cybersecurity experts with quantum-safe skills, who will be called upon to use those tools to diagnose each system separately, and determine what needs to be done to ensure that it is quantum-resistant.

Given these challenges, we must get moving if we are to have a fighting chance of being prepared. Researchers around the world are actively working to identify the algorithms on which the technologies and tools will be based. It is fair to say that the necessary education and training infrastructure exists in the industrialised world at least - though political and administrative decisions must be made for resources to be deployed or redeployed to addressing the quantum threat.

And this is where you in the room come in, along with your friends and colleagues. We all must make sure that the politicians, government officials, corporate directors and technology vendors know that the public wants the job done in time, which means starting now!

SaveOurPrivacy: A Citizen led effort for a Data Protection and Privacy Bill for India (Internet Freedom Foundation)

Speakers: 
Apar Gupta

In this session, the speakers shall discuss the background, challenges as well as need for the a comprehensive privacy bill for the largest democracy in the world. The speaker shall also discuss the principles the efforts of public interest organisations and the digital rights efforts with respect to securing a privacy and data protection framework. Lastly, the speaker shall also bring forth the existing efforts for a privacy bill and the outreach done for the citizen draft to have a individual centric law in India. 

Speakers
avatar for Iryna Chulivska

Iryna Chulivska

Digital Security Lab Ukraine
avatar for Mykola Kostynyan

Mykola Kostynyan

Community Engagement Manager, AUDS project (Internews Europe)
Digital security, org security, audits, trainings, ToT, Ukraine | wire: bezlimitchyk | Signal/WhatsApp: +380959104491
avatar for Drew Mitnick

Drew Mitnick

Policy Counsel, Access Now
MM

Michele Mosca

Professor, University of Waterloo
I work in cryptography and quantum computing. I am concerned about information and systems being protected against quantum attacks. While such attacks may be years away, it takes many years to design and deploy new cryptography reliably. We might not be ready in time, especially... Read More →
avatar for Joel Wallenstrom

Joel Wallenstrom

CEO, Wickr


Thursday May 17, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
205A

12:00

Harmful Content: Fighting Online Terrorist Incitement and Politically Motivated Disinformation
Harmful Content: Fighting Online Terrorist Incitement and Politically Motivated Disinformation

Moderators
Speakers
NG

Nathaniel Gleicher

Head of Cybersecurity Policy at Facebook
avatar for Jeff Jarvis

Jeff Jarvis

Professor, CUNY Graduate School of Journalism
I'm a big-media guy turned blogger and teacher, addicted to starting new things and the internet is made for that. Professor at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism and director of the Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism. Wrote What Would Google Do?, Public Parts... Read More →


Thursday May 17, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
204B

12:00

Mind the Shark: Informational Flow in Natural Disasters, from Fake News to Rumors
Mind the Shark: Informational Flow in Natural Disasters, from Fake News to Rumors

While misinformation has risen to the top of the agenda in journalism, the impact for humanitarian workers has yet to be fully discussed. Misinformation during natural and human disasters is a consistent theme, causing confusion and leading people to miss access to critical resources. Whether that’s the frequent false threat of sharks during hurricanes to confusion about where ICE is detaining people fleeing a disaster site, ensuring information integrity is critical to proper disaster response. What are the challenges and opportunities in this space? How can we design solutions that address this?

This focused conversations aims to look at the specific use cases of address misinformation after disasters, when not even rapid responders may not have access to the most current accurate information. In this group discussion, Meedan’s director of product An Xiao Mina will interview Antonio Martinez of Horizontal and Oliver Farshi and Natasha Jimenez of Outside about their field work and observations in a wide variety of contexts. An will bring her perspective from the misinformation space, drawing on recent research around the dynamics of misinformation, Antonio will discuss Horizontal's work with earthquake relief in Mexico during #Verificado19s, and Olly and Natasha will discuss their perspectives from with various NGOs including IRC, UNHCR, Google.org, and MercyCorps.

We will talk about the following challenges around misinformation:

- The role of television and radio in spreading misinformation
- How to use SMS and other media to directly reach people
- The role of language in creating silos of misinformation
- How to ensure that we are listening to the needs of people in disaster situations to ensure appropriate responses
- The importance of building trust with affected communities to counter misinformation
- How to work with government, companies and civil society

We will sketch out what the ideal workflows and solutions should be, with an eye toward the tools, methods and key stakeholders (government, companies, civil society, and others) that are most relevant to building a robust solution to misinformation during disaster situations.


Thursday May 17, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
200B

12:00

Offline Doesn’t Exist Anymore
It’s a paradox. We’re still in the process of connecting the unconnected, while also realising that some of the latest trends in digitisation might not be as desirable after all. So what exactly is happening and what are the solutions? Technological developments are abound, just look at smart cities, connected devices and initiatives to further digitise government processes. But with all these opportunities and trends in mind, has it become a luxury to disconnect? In a journey around the world, an international panel of experts will address these questions, identifying both the value of each development and the challenges we still have to find satisfactory answers. This way, we hope to identify strategies to ensure that progress really means progress for the sake of everyone, everywhere.

Moderators
avatar for Cathleen Berger

Cathleen Berger

Global Engagement Lead, Mozilla

Speakers

Thursday May 17, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
205B

12:00

10 days before the EU GDPR becomes applicable: are you ready?
On May 25, 2018, the EU General Data Protection Regulation will become applicable. This
law sets new rules and obligations for companies collecting, using, selling, sharing and storing personal information from people leaving in the European Union. Almost 7 years after the launch of the negotiations on this law, several questions remains: are companies ready to comply with it? Are users aware of their rights and how to exercise it? How did EU state implement the law? Are data protection authorities ready and equipped to enforce the rules?
This session will explore these issues in a dynamic format where the audience will be presented the reform and hear from a company, DPA and civil society about the opportunities and challenges brought by this law.

Moderators
avatar for Estelle Masse

Estelle Masse

Senior Policy Analyst, Access Now
Data protection, GDPR, Privacy, Net Neutrality

Speakers
avatar for Ann Cavoukian

Ann Cavoukian

Distinguished Expert-in-Residence, Privacy by Design Centre of Excellence
Three-term Privacy Commissioner of Ontario and Distinguished Expert-in-Residence, leading the Privacy by Design Centre of Excellence at Ryerson University
IF

Isabelle Falque-Pierrotin

Chair, CNIL (French Data Protection Authority)
avatar for Joe McNamee

Joe McNamee

Executive Director, European Digital Rights


Thursday May 17, 2018 12:00 - 13:15
204C

12:00

Human Rights Requirements of Cross-Border Data Demands
Law enforcement investigations increasingly rely on data stored outside the
jurisdiction of the country that is investigating a crime. The current system of law enforcement requests made under mutual legal assistance treaties (MLATs) has not been able to keep up with the growing quantity of these requests. Requests often are not processed on a timely basis, which can result in criminals evading prosecution and law enforcement’s inability to interdict some crimes. The need for this data has spurred some governments to demand that their users' data be stored locally, and has spurred others to issue surveillance demands that purport to have extraterritorial effect.

In response, at least three processes are underway to develop mechanisms that address the problem: (i) the E-Evidence initiative of the European Union; (ii) bi-lateral agreements – such as those envisioned in the U.S. CLOUD Act -- to permit direct demands on communications service providers made by particular countries in which they have no physical presence; and (iii) a negotiated protocol to the Budapest Cybercrime Convention that would enable signatories to the protocol to make direct demands on providers in other signatory nations.

This roundtable is designed to explore the human rights criteria that should be built into these new mechanisms. For example, must a signatory to the planned protocol to the Budapest convention have a legal system that requires judicial authorization of data demands? Must a signatory to a bilateral agreement agree to give notice (or delayed notice) to the subject of its data demand? Is it realistic to expect that countries will change the processes by which they obtain access to Internet users’ data so the country can participate in one of these new mechanisms and get a speedy response?

Moderators
avatar for Greg Nojeim

Greg Nojeim

Director, Project on Freedom, Security and Technology, Center for Democracy & Technology
Cybersecurity, surveillance, United States surveillance laws, ECPA, cross border law enforcement demands for Internet users' communications, encryption
avatar for Lucy Purdon

Lucy Purdon

Policy Officer, Privacy International
| | Lucy is Policy Officer with Privacy International and leads the global policy work on cybersecurity and identity. She works across the organisation and with international partners to develop policy recommendations and positions based on research project findings. | | Lucy... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for María Paz Canales

María Paz Canales

Executive Director, Derechos Digitales
avatar for Maryant Fernandez

Maryant Fernandez

Senior Policy Advisor, European Digital Rights (EDRi)
Maryant is a Senior Policy Advisor at European Digital Rights (EDRi) and a lawyer admitted to the Madrid Bar association. Maryant defends human rights and fundamental freedoms online in the European Union. She works on surveillance and law enforcement, intermediary liability (e-c... Read More →
avatar for David Lieber

David Lieber

Senior Privacy